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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: July 19, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - July 19, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               H ared to 291 for the first term. District Works.'Director Returns From School Of Instruction W. E. James, District 13 works progress director, and John M, Hendrix, assistant director, return- ed last night from San Antonio, where they conferred with. Harry P. Drought, state director, and at- tended a school of instruction. Hendrix went to his Sweetwater home to make his arrangements for taking up temporary residence in Abilene. James went to his upstairs office, 949 South First street, took off his coat, readied for pencil and paper, and began the knotty job of picking other department heads. These will include the works engi- POIf CHIEF Protestants As Well As Catholics Warned; War On the Jews Develops Openly Ethiopian Rulers Plea To Followers Makes War Certain Italy Declares No Other Way Out Now; Soon to De- liver Ultimatum July 19. of a Nazi drive See JAMES, Page. 14, Col. 2 Welder Is Killed as Tank Explodes HOBBS, N. M.. July Leo Black. 26, was instantly killed here late Thursday when the tank of a truck used in transporting hy- drocholoric acid exploded while he was welding a leak. The tank was empty and the cause for the explosion was not im- mediately determined. Black put his welding torch to the tank, one of a fleet used In the transportation of acid to nearby oil wells, when the explosion occurred The end of the tank was blown several hundred feet in the air by the force of the blast, witnesses said FARLEY ON VACATION WASHINGTON. July Postmaster General Farley left Thursday for New York, on the first leg of a vacation jaunt which will take him to the Hawaiian Islands. He expects to return to Washing- ton about September first. OLD SETTLERS OF COUNTY IN BERLIN, Indications against politics in Germany's Protestant churches as well as in the Roman Catholic wen seen today simultaneously with the appointment of an avowec anti-semitic as head of the Ber lin police. Resigns Under Fire Count von Helldorf was namec president of Berlin's police to suc- ceed Magnus von Levetzow, who re- signed under the criticism that he had failed to chase the Jews out ol Berlin or at least restrict them to the Ghetto. Roman Catholic priests were warned against taking part in pol- itics by Reichsfuehrer Hitler's Voel- itlscher Beobaehter. On top of all this the National Zeitung at Essen, which is regard- ed as the personal mouthpiece of General Hermann Wilhclm Goerlng, minister ,of aviation. Premier of Prussia, and head of the secret po- lice warned Protestants that oppo- sition to Reichsbishop Muftjler and ''German Christian" Nazis, could expect as hard a fight as the Cath- olic hierarchy. It was von Hellendorf who, in L929, organized the first antl-Sem- tic demonstration of the Kurfuer- where several Jews were beaten up this week in anti-Semitic outbreaks. He was appointed to the police post by Wilhelm Frlck, minister of the Interior, following a stormy Sec GERMANY, Page 13, Col. 4 Cotton And Grain And Pasture Lands Are Benefited Abilene and the Taylor county area shared in timely and refresh- ing showers which fell over West Texas Thursday night and Friday morning, reducing temperatures and bringing material benefit to cotton and grain sorghum crops and pas- ture lands. Fall here totaled .-19 inch, bringing precipitation for the year to "date to 17.76 inches. A Thursday evening shower accountc-ri for .40 of the moisture, while 03 fell Friday morning. Forecast WHS for partly cloudy weather tonight and Saturday. Light rains were reported in the south and west part of Taylor I county. Buffalo Gap and the Abi- lene lake area received showers, as did Trent and Merkel. Fall at the lake was not sufficient to raise the water level preceptibly. Heaviest rains reported were in the Winters and Balllnger area, fall ROME, July un- official circles asserted today that Emperor Halle Selassie's exhortation to his people to "fight to the last man" rendered certain an armed settlement of Italy's dispute with Ethiopia. These sources interpreted the ad- dress as an Indication of the Em- peror's determination not to yield to Italian demands. No official re- action could be obtained, however, authorities declining to comment formally. The possiDlllty arose, meanwhile, of final diplomatic negotiations be- tween Rome and Addis Ababa. Ethiopia Must Bow The authoritative foreign affairs review, 'affari said the con- troversy could be solved peacefully if Ethiopia would accept solutions which eventually will be proposed. This statement was taken by In- formed circles to mean that Italy will deliver an ultimatum 19 Ethio- pia, containing Its conditions for peace, with a olear understanding that if the conditions are not ac- cepted, war will follow. Absolute control by Italy of mil- itary forces In Ethiopia apd the right to Italian colonization in--trie' empire were set forth by the review as Italy's objects in the dispute. If these aims can be achieved peacefully, all well and good, the review said. It expressed doubt of such possibility, however, and said that otherwise Italy must try other methods. Middy Jailed E. W. Wood of New York (be- midshipman on the D. S. battleship Wyoming, was. arrest- ed during anti-Jewish riots In Berlin after he expressed disgust at seeing a woman knocked down, He apent the night In jail and was fined 50 marks. (Associated Press Fervent Demonstrations Aroused In Africa (CnnyrlRlil. 7B3B, ttj Ansnrlntcd Prtdll ADDIS ABARA, July" or Halle Selassie's militant call I his rjeopjie to defend Ethiopia In dependence "to the death" arouse fervent demonstrations of enthus lasm today. The cheers and cries of the almos fanatical tribal warriors resounde in Memelik dust trod See ETHIOrlA.Pase 14, Col. 5 TRADE GAINS DURING WEEK Dun Bradstreet Surve Industrial Operations Morning Drizzle Fails To Cut Attendance at Annual Event; Governor Allred Afternoon Speaker By Staff Corespondent BUFFALO GAP, July 19. Old Imers of this area and pioneers ho lived here In other days were athered today for the annual re- nion of the Taylor County Old Jettlers association, on event which egularly draws draws a crowd of everal thousand. Although a drizzling rain at mld- oming delayed activities ttendnnce was not materially cut r.d the crowd at noon bid fair to qunl or exceed that of -recent ears. An address by Governor James V. See REUNION, U. OoL 5 Allred Delayed; Is Due at Governor James V. Allred Is ex- pected to arrive at the Abilene air- port at this afternoon, moro than an hour behind his announced schedule, according to advice re- ceived here early this afternoon. The governor telephoned Abilene friends shortly after noon that hi had been delayed at Miners! Wells, Sec GOVERNOR, Page 13, Col. 5 See RAINS, Page 13, CoL 5 Japan to Stage Navy Maneuvers TOKYO, July announced today that the preliminary phases ol the Japanese navy's annual grand maneuvers will begin tomorrow and will continue until early October. Although the announcement, the first official statement concerning the war games, did not mention their locale, It was understood au- thoritatively that the final phase will be carried out In a wide area of the Northwest Pacific between Japan proper and the Kurlle Is- lands. RESUMING TESTIMONY GEOROE WEST. July Further testimony was planned to- day In the trial of W. L. (Bud) Clark, charged with slaying Virgil Dnbbs. Previous testimony was vir- tually a repetition of that In the Charles C. Clark trial In the same slaying case. NEW YORK, July ,ra-seasonal gains In industrial op nations featured the trade situa Ion during the past week, Dun Bradstreet reported today In thel weekly summary of business Condi ions. "The midsummer season ha it said, "with the expectei recession yet to develop to Its usua degree of Intensity. In fact, th rebound of industrial operations which was contrary to all norms trends, easily took precedence over all other occurrences of the week particularly because of the broad- ness of the Increase when along- side the comparative showing of year ago. "Retail distribution continued to widen, with the heat wave accelera- ting previous gains, while the more rapid pace of wholesale buying re- flected dwindling stocks find the im- proved outlook for fall. "Deriving benefit from the hot spell and the largest tourist traffic since 1930, retail In most parts of the country exceeded nil compar- ative totals for a number of years. "Stocks of summer goods already have been reduced to a minimum for this period, evnn though many merchants arc .iot holding special July clearances this year. "The volume of retail sales In most district achieved stronger advant- age In the comparison with 1934, the estimated Increase for the country ranging from 12 to 30 percent "In a number of divisions the rate of gain in wholesale buying ran to o. larger percentage than at retail, the brisk flow from fill-in orders indicated that many merchants had underestimated consumer require- ments." BANK HOLDUP LOOT IS Five Armed Men In Raid at CHESTER, Pa., July Five robbers today held up a branch of the Delaware County National Bank nnd fled with The hold-up men, all masked, covered employes and patrons with guns, forcing thorn to lie on the floor. They scooped the money from the cashier's cage and fled In an auto- mobile. The branch bank handles the payroll money for several industrial plants here and in nearby Marcus Hook. Police said the holdup was timed to take place just before the money was sent to the plants. The bank is located In the heart of an Industrial section. Ginner Gets Injunction; Licensing Provision of Act Ruled Out In Fruit Industry Test Two Texas federal courts to- day dealt smashing; blows to the already crumbling- Agricul. tural Adjustment Administra- tion. Of greatest interest to the cotton country was the ruling of Federal Judge Randolph Bryant at Sherman in holding the Bankhead cotton control act unconstitutional and grant- ing an injunction against its enforcement. The test case ia Judge Bry- ant's court was brought on be- half of the ginners of Texas by D. 0. Wallace of Gunter. The case was set for trial on its merits September 11. At Brownsville the licensing provision of the Agricultural A d j u s t m ent Administration was ruled unconstitutional and Judge T. M. Kennerly denied an injunction sought by Secre- tary Wallace in a test case with Rio Grande Valley fruit buyers and shippers. .Injunction Is Granted To: SHERMAN, July eral Judge Randolph Bryant toda] ruled the Bankhead cotton Contraci Act unconstitutional, and signed an order granting an Injunction againsl its enforcement. The Injunction was granted to D C. Wallas, Gunter glnncr, who sued on behalf of himself and all other cotton sinners of Texas and the Texas cotton glnners. On June 25 Judge Bryant denied a temporary restraining order In the cose on the 'rounds that government was noi disposed to prosecute the glivners at that time for failure to comply with the act. Today he said, in a written ppln ion: "I think that the law Is clearly and plainly unconstitutional. Owing See COURTS, Page 14, Col. 3 Diver Locates Treasure Ship LEWES, DeL, July hunters today re- ported they had located the British Sloop, Debraak, which sank In a squall near here 140 years ago with a cargo of Span- ish fold said to be worth Harry Morgan, dtver with a party of New England said a length of the ship's rail- Ing had been raised at a spot near Cape Henlopen. The rail fits Milh the description of the sloop. Salvagers, confident that the vessel Is the Debraak, returned to Providence, n. I., to get equip- ment for raising the capsized sloop. Hagenberger Wins Colliers Trophy NEW YORK, July American aviation's cherished hon- or, the Collier trophy awarded an- nually for outstanding achieve- ments, will go to Captain Albert F. legenbergcr of the army air corps, Collier's weekly announced last night. The award was made lor Captain Jegenberger's achievements In blind lying and Instrument landing. Several East Texas Sec- tions Affected By Power Tie-Up TYLER, July W) were on the alert today to prevenl >ossible violence In the labor dls- mte between union workers or.d he Gulf Public Service company hich became serious after lines cut In 11 East Texas towns. Armi.-d deputy sheriffs were call- d Into service at Jacksonville, cen- ral point of the dispute where some 0 union men. remained on strike, nd other points.. Company officials said that pow- r lines which were cut Wednesday Ight and yesterday at Rusk, Mount elman, Sinclair City, Wright City, acksonvlllc. Alto, OverUm, Arp, OTi'tehouse, Bullard and Dlalvlllc ad been repaired and Mint fur- icr violence was not expected. Manager F. C. Rand of Jackson- He said ho didn't know what ausc-d the strike, which started two ays ago. J. A. Atkinson, superintendent of See STRIKE, Pago 14, CoL 2 Celebrate Completion ol Hard Surface to San Antonio, Border COLEMAN, July 19. _ Highway enthusiasts of several states, including original boosters of the old Lone Star Trail asso- ciation, met In Coleman today to celebrate completion -of an all- weather highway into Sir. Actonlo, the lower Rio Grande valley ana Mexico. The Coleman chamber of com- merce and Lions and Klwanls were Joint hosts with the Highway 191 association, and among the .warn.Delegations from and" Who a'rg 'Interested In promoting a single-numbered- federal highway from Ciuiada to Mexico, following" this route. County Judges and com- missioners courts were on hand south of Coleman, and Harry Hlnes, chairman of the state highway commission, with Glbb GU- chrlst, state engineer, was expected to arrive for the afternoon session. The San Antonio chamber of corn- See ROAD MEET, Page 14, Col. 7 Seguln Man Kills Another and Self SAN ANTONIO, July John Zipp, 35-year old Seguln fill- Ing station operator, was shot to death last night at his home, four miles west of Sequin. A short time after the shooting, Henry Jtahe, 42-year old brother- in-law of was found shot to death In the bathroom of his home, Ihrce miles away from the Zipp res- idence. Justice of the peace George R. 3. Dix returned a verdict that Rahe shot Zipp and then went to his own home and committed suicide. Sen. Weaver Moore, Au- thor Of Amendment, Speaks Over Radio HOUSTON, July Jampnign of Texas repealists wns under way today following opening drive launched last by State Senator Weaver Moore, Houston, author of the repen] amendment. SpcakinR over a state-wide broad- cast, Senntor Moore said that Tex- as voters would choose between two questions on August 24- "regulation and tuxjitloi, or violation and no regulation." "The repeal he .said, represents the best, efforts of those who have labored long and hard in irder that the citizens of this state night hnve an opportunity to cx- iress their views upon this cjues- Ion." Submission of the prohibition uestlon to the voters Is In line with democratic platform adopted In 932 and upon which President Roosevelt and Vice President John Garner were elected, Senator [oore said. He said the first section of the See REPEAL, Page 14, Col. 1 Ask U.S. Funds for Midland Airport WASHINGTON. July The works- administration announc- ed today that applications from the department for funds to car- ry out construction and Improve- ments projects Included: Midland, Texas, for reconstrvction of buildings and other improve- ments at Clonn Field, including re- contsurction of hangar with masonry walls and new roof nnd paving of roads, runways, aprons, and other Improvements to landing area 000. Ahil, nc and cloudy to rln'jdy Hjnlfihl r.nd Saturday. U'csi of. limti meridian Partly cloudy; prohnbly thowcrs In south- en-it porllon tonight nnd Saturday. Easi of lOOlh meridian Fn-rlly cloudy to cloudy, local showers IB south portion tonlcht and Saturday. Rdlnfnll t" "M hours ending 7 a. m, Fri- day, .10 Tolnl Eince rim of year, to 7 m. Fri- day, lT.f.7 I Tola! fur lame amount since first lut year, 8.94 ihe yrar. Temperatures- Thurs. Frt. p. S7 Sunrise Simscl 7p.m. 7fl We. thermometer Relative humidity 15? a.m. 72 72 72 72 73 IS 7IJ 78 73 7H5 :39rre IS- 89-   

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