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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: July 8, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - July 8, 1935, Abilene, Texas                                FAIR Abilene Bail? "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron B _ _ _ VOL. Full Leased Wires of Associated Press United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY, JULY 8, 1935- EIGHT PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abilene Morning New) NUMBER 218 Wealth Taxes Not To Go For Bonus New Laws Make Long Absolute Ruler Garner Starts Blast, Ducks Echo Vice President Gamer shown In his Washington office as he pressed (he button starting blasting onei-ations on the Passamaquoddy, Maine, Udc-harrirsslnr project. Senator While left, and Garner covered their ears to' escape the echo of the blast, a useless precaution. (Associated Press Temperature Here Fire Destroys Home Their Parents In Cochran Co. LEVELLAND, July Tw children, nine-month-old Geraldin Lyons and her 4-year-old sister, Nor ma Ruth, were burned fatally whe the home of their parents, elgh miles north of Whiteface In th eastern edge of Cochran county, wa, consumed by flames about thl mom Ing. Their father. Berry Lyons, suffer ed burns on the arms and the heat and face in rescuing the infant His condition was believed to be no serious. The mother was suffering from emotional shock. The younger child died soon afte: being brought by automobile to i Dhyslcian's office here. The othei child died in her bed. The Lyons only had the two chil- dren. itJThe father was preparing to milk near the house. He called tc his wife, who was cooking on an oi stove, to bring some hot water to him to a separator. She took the water to him and they saw their house burst into flames, evidently as a result of the explosion. Neighbors saw the house afire They went to it and prevented the father from entering it again in an effort to rescue the other child. The injured father was brought here with his dying baby. Wheat Payments 33 Cents Bushel WASHINGTON, July proclamation by Secretary Wallace today established the minimum 1935 wheat adjustment payments at least 33 cents a bushel compared to the 1935 minimum of 29 cents. Payments for both years, the AAA said, are subject to slight deduc- tions for county administration costs. Chester C. Davis, AAA adminis- trator, said the Increase of lour cents a bushel for the 1935 allot- ments represents additional Income cooperating wheat producers of "approximately Under the new schedules, Davis asserted, producers will receive ad- justment payments of at least on the 1935 crop instead of on the 29 cent basis. No change WPS made In the pro- cessing tax rate ot 30 cents B biufa- Sunday's Fair To Be-Equalled ;or Even Surpassed Today spot on the Texas map Sundav with a high of 100" degrees at 3 p. noon was both expecting and preparing for still higher temperatures this aft- ernoon." After checking apparatus at the local United States weather bureau late this morning. Observer W. H. Green reported the mercury appar- ently was ascending more rapidly than Sunday, under influence of layers of hot surface atmosphere which hovered over Abilene through the night, and the influx of more alistering rays from Old Sol. The mercury -receded only 14 de- grees in the 15-hour period from 3 p. m. Sunday to 6 a. m. today, ;he meteorologist said. It remain- ed at the lowest degrees- only slightly more than, .an hour before launching an upward climb after 7 a. m. this morning, he add- ed. Highest of Year The Sunday here for the by two degrees the summer's previous peak of 98 degrees, recorded Saturday. to Saturday the top tempera- for the year was 97, reached n the latter part of May and again early last week.1 Not unduly alarmed by the heat, seasoned prognosticators point to Abilene's all-time heat mark for June of 110 degrees, recorded at the veather bureau on June 30, See HEAT WAVE, Page 7, Col. Control of All Electio Machinery, Employee and Tax Money Give To the "Kingfish" BATON ROUGE, Jul 8. Huey P. Long Louisiana legislature create today the most autocratic gov eminent in American history railroading 25 Long-sponsore acts into law in 58 minutes o a midnight session. Absolute Monarch. Acting under protection of si; months-old martial the sena virtually abolished municipal gov ernments throughout the state an seized control over the jobs of 12 000 school teachers and of evei public Job-holder in the state f< the dictator's patronage machine. In 20 days, when the new become effective, Long -will becon almost absolute monarch of the sta in which he was born in poverty i a back country cabin. The political machine he rul1 without check will collect and spen taxes of- ail run the. .publ hire "and lire almo every public job holder in the slat and hold in its hands the state election machinery. One of the 26 bills rushed throug the senate between a. m. an a. m., when the gavel bange the third special legislative sessio of 1935 out of existence, will almos kill the New Orleans "old regular faction, Long's only effective oppo sitlon over five years. Controls City Employes, Tt gives a Long-controlled stat board control over city civ service employes, including clerk In the office of Mayor T. Semme Walmsley and assistants of Dlstric Attorney Eugene Stanley. It als transfers to state control collectioi and disbursement of New Orlean gasoline and liquor taxes, almost th city's last remaining source of rev enue. The'city government remains in name, but not in fact. The last bill was deleated from Long's 26 point program- standing beside the senate secretary's desk the Kingfish noisily announced, don't want that bill passed." Ask- Ing for the acting floor leader a the senate's last reading of the bill Sunday night Long said, "Tell him to have bill No. 26 returned to the calendar it comes up'for ad- let it die on thi calendar." The bill would have re- quired contracting firms not domi ciled in Louisiana to pay si.noo li- cense fees on all jobs over The senateetnioaFoCllSbms'cmfw Quick Session. The senate and house convened as soon after m'idngiht as poss to complete a session opened under Long's direction on Independence day. The clerk read Bill No. 1, the See LOUISIANA, Page 7, Col. 8 ALLRED LEADS MOTORPARTY Group On 600 Mile Park Site Inspection Trip WICHITA PALLS, July Gov. James V. Allred headed a :oup of state, highway and Amer- can Legion officials who planned oday an inspection of proposed jark situs along the American Legion Memorial highway. The motorcade's starting point ras at the Byeis, Texas, Red River ridge, and the officials expected o end the tour at McAHen Wed- esday night. The motorists were to follow a 00-mile strip on Highway 66 and over tracts under consldera- on by legion posts in the various ommunltles for possible acquisition is wayside parks. Tonight the party was to stay in Mineral Wells. Included In the roup wera Harry Hlnes, Wichita alls, state chairman of the high- ay commission; H. Miller Alns- orth, state legion commander; R. Whlttaker, state park engineer; ibb Ollchrlst, state highway engi- eer, and John Wood and D. K. utla, ftate commission- ROCKEFELLER 96 YEARS OLD Retired Billionaire In Best Health For Years LAKEWOOD. N. J., July John D. Rockefeller Sr, was four score and sixteen today and enjoy- ing the best health In years. Routine in "Golf House" with its 25 servants remained unchanged, with any birthday observance bar- red. The nonagenarian's son, John D. Rockefeller Jr., spen; the day with him. "He hasn't felt better In many the son said. .'Sis dentist, Dr. Max Goldstein, reported that the annual examina- tion showed his 19 natural teeth still sound with no need for fillings, drillings or extractions. The birthday marked the year since the start of the business career that carried Mr. Rockefeller from the possession of nothing ;he possession of estimated billions. The actual size of his fortune lins ncvpr been revealed. At 16 he started work as an 6ee ROCKEFELLER, Page 7, CoL 1 EIRay Roberts Is Fat ally Injured In Automobile Wreck Mrs. Henry Sayles and Son Hal, Also Hurt; Were On Way To California Happily-made plans for a two weeks vacation in southern Cali- fornia, starting Sunday morning, terminated fatally eight hours later at Van Horn, 350 miles west of Abi- lene on highway 1, where Miss El- Ray Roberts, 26. member.of a pio neer Abilene family, died at 2 a. n from injuries received 40 minute earlier, when she was thrown i the- pavement, from an ovcrturnin automobile. In the car, a 1934 light model, wer Miss the right-ban front seat; her aunt, Mrs. Henrj Sayles of 740 Sayles boulevard, a the wheel; and Mrs. Sayles1 younge son, Hal, member of the Reporter News staff, on the back seat. Mr Sayles' left arm was broken an she received shoulder injuries, no serious; and Hal Sayles escape with bruises. No Collision The three left Abilene at 6 a. m their destination San Diego and th California International Pacific ex position. -Included in the plan wa a visit in Beverly Hills with' Mr Sayles' Mrs. Thohia Sayles, and her1- daughter. Mrs. Jac of Abilene. At Fecosf Mrs. ih wheel from Hal, who retired to th back seat for a nap. A half-jnil east of Van Horn, on a clear stretc with no other vehicle near, the ca suddenly plunged out of contro swerved from the pavement an turned over twice, the righ-han door flying open. It was through that door that Mis Roberts was catapulted, her bod striking the pavement with terrin force. An eastbound Greyhound bu and two automobiles were ac th scene almost immediately. Mis Roberts, unconscious, and Mrs. Say les, semi-conscious, were taken fi Van Horn in private cars snd t'iv en first aid treatment by doc Roberts died within 41 minutes, not regaining consciousness Doctors said her chest hsd been crushed. Others to Hospital At 3 p. m., still only partly con- scious, Mrs. Sayles was registerec in at Camp Camp's hospital in Pecos, where she will be kani in complete quiet until she recovf 'rom the shock. She has not been See ACCIDENT, Page 3, Col. 4 PITES LOOT JURY PROBES HAITSDEATH Four Persons Accused, In Jail Here, Deny Charges Four persons, .two men and two xamen, who were to be called be- ore the grand jury of 104th district ourt this afternoon on charges of nurder in connection with the eath of W. F. Hale in 1932, stoutly ienied the charges against them, rom their cells in the county jail .t noon today. Defendants are Mrs. Dovie Mar- In, Clarence B. (Candy) Compton, Jrs. Clarence B. Compton of Abi- ene, and Wayne Northington, who ivas brought here Sunday from Cllgore. The body of Hale, 59-year-old was found fully clad In he waters of Lake Kirby, on Thurs- ay. September 1, 1932. 'I am as. innocent as any mon ould possibly be." said NorthinB- nn. "I never saw Mr. Halo In my fe, and I learned about his death rom my daughter, who wrote me t Kllgore about the finding of he body." 'He was as good a friend as I ad In said Compton, a .acksmlth. Mrs. Compton also said her Inl- and and Hale were close friends nd that Mr. Hale had spent two and t their home the week before his ody was found. She did not see ale after he left her home on ridey mottling at 9 o'clock, she ild, and did not know he was miss- ig until she heard the body had een found. Mrs. Martin said she knew Hale nly she had met him wlcc at the Compton home. Complaints against'the four wrre i go to the grand jury this after- lei) GRAND TOBY, fttt Col. i Five Men Get Loot 0 and Escape to California Coast LONG BEACH, Calif., July modern "pirates" arme with shotguns boarded the gamblln ship Monte Carlo at 5 a. m. today forced members of the crew to ope; the safe and took They flei in a small white power boat. Ed V. Turner, owner of the barge said the men carried shotguns an were disguised by stockings pullei over their heads. Eye-holes hat been cut in the masks: A few hours before the robberj hundreds of week-end gamblers ha been taken to shore in speed-boats Only Turner and members of th crew, Including a score of husk were, on board. While members olrate crew held Turner and his aides at' bay others forced Turner's cashier t open the safe. They seized th money, went over the side and thel power boat sped toward shore an hundreds of inlets, docks and mile of beaches which offered conceal ment or a place to land. A coast guard boat put to sea a soon as the robbery was reportec seeking to locate the "pirate" craft Before leaving the ship, the band its tied up Turner and the ten mem- bers of his crew. The loot consisted of both cash and Jewelry, police were-informed. Turner said most of his crew were asleep when the robbers boarded the barge. Games on the vessel included roulette, dice, poker, chuck-a-luck lotteries, blackjack and wheel-of- fort'jne. With facilities hundred to persons at the gambling devices, water taxies gen- erally are crowded to and from the boat week-ends and holidays. The Monte Carlo is one of two gambling vessels anchored off Los Angeles. They have been the sub- ject of litigation as to whether they were under jurisdiction of loca authorities. Each has a bar, dance floor and dining room. A previous robbery occurred on ;he Johanna Smith, a gambling boat which since burned. President Soon to Start lor Pacific WASHINGTON, July President Roosevelt hopes to start on a trip to the Paciiic coast im- mediately after congress adjourns, the Wh.te House disclosed today. The president tentatively has ar- ranged to stop off fit Milwaukee on Aug. 23. when the Young Demo- cratic clubs of America will be hi convention there. E. M. Mobley ol San Angelo Dies SAN ANGELO, July 8- icral services were held here today or E. M. Mobley. S6, tax investiga- or for the Santa Fe railroad. Mr. Mobley, who came here 2S years go from Big Spring, died ytstcrday ftemoon. Burial was at Robert Lee following services here. Survi- ors include the widow and two sons, Guy Mobley of San Angelo nd W. H. Mobley of Dallas. Report Favorable On Church Elder Friends of Dr. R. A. Stewart, pre- ding elder of the Abilene district, tfethodlst Episcopal church, who ast Tuesday underwent a major urglcal operation In Dallas, have een advised his condition Is "as avorable as can be expected." .Surgery was for removal of a kld- cy, and wns performed at Baylor ospltal In Dallas. He Is remaining under care ot physicians at the hos- pital. Morgenthau Tells Com- mittee Levies Could Raise From 000 to WASHINGTON, July opinion that wealth distribution taxes could be levied to raise to annually was ex pressed to the house Ways and means committee today by Sec- retary Morgenthau. While he was testifying, the White House emphasized the administration was making ho specific recommendation on tax rates and that Morgenthau was simply "presenting estimates based on schedules suggested by committee members. Confined to Three FoliiU. A plain Intimation was given at the White House that -President Roosevelt expected the new tax bill to be confined to the three points he suggested to on high Inheritances, on high Incomes, and a graduated corporation tax to replace the present flat rate. On that basis, it was assumed the president did not expect congress to make a general revision of taxes by dipping Into the medium and lower income brackets. Morgenthau said "it would be perilous, to regard ot these new rcveftufc as available for new types of expenditures or as Justify- ing any Increase over our carefully budgeted plans for federal out- lays." He added that the time has come to move In the direction of pro- viding sufficient Income "both '.o meet current expenditures and to make substantial reductions In the debt." "The treasury's first concern with 'the adequacy of the national Morgenthau said. "There are times of'emergency when the treasury must finance expenditures in excess of income by borrowings which Increase the public debt. "But the national welfare demands that when such an emergency has passed sufficient Income be raised both to meet current expenditures and to make substantial reductions in the debt. "The time has come to move ;his direction. It would, of course, be unwise to impose tax ourdens which would retard recovery. But t would be equally unwise not to call on sources of -revenue which would reduce our borrowings and iter reduce the national debt with- out Interfering with' recovery, and t is my belief that the additional taxes which the president has now recommended fall within this latter class." This was regarded In some circles as an administration answer to new proposals for paying off the bonus. "What we're hopeful remark- Sec TAXES, Page 7, Col. 8 TOBACCO MAN DIES ABOARD THE S. S. KUNGS- HOLM, July Bowman Gray, chairman of the board of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco company, died aboard ship yesterday after a heart ttack. Italy Speeds Preparations To Go to War ROMB, July step ped up concentration of troops fo action in East Africa today, some observers predicted warfare be tween Italy and Ethiopia before th rainy season ends In September. The blackshlrt divisions, It wa disclosed, have been increased i to men Four divisions have been complete and another is to be ready soon. More than soldiers and o: fleers are en route to Africa on three ships that sailed during the weel end. Other transports are ready i their docks, awaiting only the fll rival of volunteer battalions. Although most observers held tha hostilities could not begin befoi the heavy rains let up In Septembe some expressed a belief that th controversy was developing so rap idly that it would come to a hra sooner. The nation rallied strongly Premier Benlto Mussolini's to blackshlrts, ready to d  federal agents. Senate Faces Decision On Death Sentence of Holding Companies WASHINGTON, July Friends and foes of the Roosevelt power program came to grips again today, opening another week of des- perate fighting on an issue laden with potential significance for thi 1936 campaign. These were the varied develop- ments as the powerful forces began their struggle anew. 1. The senate met face to face a decision on the "death sentence" for public utility holding companies. 2. The house plunged Into debate on amendments to the Tennessee valley authority law, thus ing a new test of the president1! control over congress. 3. Members of the house rules committee attempted informally to decide when to begin its Inquiry into lobbying on the utilities bill. Some members thought It was to start this morning and showed up for the Inquiry, but others said no definite time had been set. 4. The sneate neared a decision on a. plan for a investiga- tion, with Senator Clark (D-Mo) Sec UTILITIES, Page 7, Col. 6 All-Star Game CLEVELAND, July A crowd of fans tamed oat this afternoon for the third annual all- tar pune between picked players of .he American and National leagues. (Core By Innings R. H. E. nationals ...000 lOi 3 1 Americans ..210 Olx 5 0 Batteries: Vationals-Walker Schu- macher (Giants) and Wilson (Fhll- Gomez (Yankees) and Hemsley Abilene and Generally fair lo- (Kht and Tuesday. Weal of 100th meridian .enerajlr fair except local ahovsre ID ex- e wtgt portion tonlghl and Tuesday, vt of 100th meridian rally fair tonight and Sun. p.m. Wen t A 83 n 71 H Midnight Noon Sunrise 7p.m. 7a.m. y Ihcrmomcltr IE UlermonMUr Ittlvi feUBMhx   

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