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Abilene Daily Reporter: Monday, July 1, 1935 - Page 1

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - July 1, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               i 'CLO TLY IDY Abilene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron UV. Full Leased Wires of Associated Press United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS. MONDAY, JULY 1, PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abilene Morning News) NUMBER 2.12 PITS LOOT BAH Brownwood Jury Gives Wood Ten Year Term KEYS HOLD UNDISPUTED RECORD Slayer, Victim IVilllam L. Ferris, Detroit po- lice character, top, who has con- fessed killing Howard Carter Dickinson, bottom, prominent New York attorney and a nephew of Chief Ji'sticc Charles Evans Ferris was arrested ID Fort Wayne, Ind. TO imp MY Old Mark of 647 Hours Passed By Brothers At Noon MERIDIAN, Miss., July At one minute after noon today. ?red and Al Key became the world's undisputed champion airplane en- durance fliers. At this time they passed the un- official record of 647 hours, 28 min- utes and 30 seconds set in 1930 in St. Louis by Dale Jackson and For- est O'Brine. Last Thursday they beat the of- ficial record of 553 hours, 41 min- utes and 30 seconds made In Chica- go in 1930 by John and Kenneth Hunter. They planned to come down at tonight. They took to the air at p. m. on June 4. "After a careful check-up and in- spection of the Al Key said, "it seems that crystalization has be- gun to set in due to the constant vibration 021 a number of the wires and small braces, and having the undisputed world's record in the bag, wa deem it unwise to remain in the air any TJustr .Al said bad weather for the past tVo days had also influenced the brothers in their decision. They have been forced to "ride out" three rainstorms In 48 hours. The fliers began theli 28th consecutive day in the air at noon. MANADMITSHE SLEW LAWYER H. C. DICKINSON DETROIT, July tained only as material witnesses, tor Duncan C. McCrea announced IMcCrea 5alti- Missing Tourists A. great manhunt is underway in New Mexico for the bodies of Mr. and Mrs. George Lorius, top, and Mr. and Mrs. Albert Heber- er. East St. Louis, 111., tourists, who are believed to have brtn robbed and slain. They were last heard from May 23. Alarm Quickly Spread FDR Loser In Utility Bill Fight Defendant Well Pleased By Verdict, Brought In Sunday After Forty- Four Hours of Debate today that no charges will be plac- ed against three girl companions of William Lee Ferris, 26-year-old con- fessed slayer of Howard Carter Dickinson, New York attorney. [drew a gun as they rolled dice In The announcement was made aft- I the car and was shot in a scuffle; er the prosecutor and police offi- cials had questioned Ferris and the >irls for more than 24 hours in an effort to compromise the conflict- ing versions of an all night party which left the attorney dead on a lonely park road, a bullet through his head and another through his body. The three girls, Jean Miller, Lo- retta Jackson and Florence Jack- son, arrested in a Port Wayne, In- diana, hotel with Ferris, will be de- another the attorney drew the gun when he (Ferris) stopped the car in the lonely Rouge park at the girls' request, and a third that Dickinson fired one shot through his head to take his own life and the second was fired as Ferris grabbed for the weapon. Detective Chief Fred W. Frahm said although Ferris' stories were too vague and improbable to merit See SLAYING, Page 10, Col. 3 Meanwhile detectives, admittedly I bewildered by the bizare accounts tonmirxnwnnn Ferris and his companions gave, sought to develop a motive from Ferris' stories, one that Dickinson Dr. R. A. Collins Is Wiggins' Successor Death Toll 91 In Japanese Flood TOKYO, July home of- fJce survey of 17 prefectures, rav- aged by floods, disclosed today that 91 persons were known dead and 17 missing. The flood waters, raging in west- ern Japan, began to Fubslde, and communications were restored as the made its survey. The home office said the 17 miss- Ing persons, were believed dead, 103 wen; injured, buildings were destroyed, 194.000 buildings Lawyer Raises a Lega Question; Trial Will Begin Friday SEATTLE, July nice legal Question of whether Margaret Thulin Waley was obligated to ex- pose her kidnaper husband and his accomplice In the George Weyer- haeuser case was described today as her chief defense of charges of Lindbergh law violation. John F. Doce, hsr attorney, raised were partly flooded, 1238 roads were "le Polnt in discussing what constl- damaged and acres of farm-! tutes "participation" In a crime, and Inundated with their crops! particularly as it refers to a wife, irotably destroyed. i in preparing for Mrs. Waleys trial ACTIVITY IN REALJSTATE Deals Assuming Important Proportions In U. S. Middlebush New Mo-U President COLUMBIA. Mo., July Forseelng brighter days for the Uni- versity of Missouri, Dr. Frederick A. MlddlebuEh, 44. today assumed the presidency of the university, suc- ceeding Dr. Walter Williams, 70, who resigned because oi ill health but- continued as dean of the school of journalism which he founded In 1908. at Tacoma Friday. "Mere passive assent to the See MBS. WALEY, Paee 10, Col. 5 July After deliberating for 44 hours the jury in the trial of Stanley i Wood agreed late Sunday on j a 10-year penitentiary sentence! as punishment for murder of1 Fred Brown, Talpa rancher, near that Coleman county town the night of May 3, this year. Wood pleaded self-defense. Trial Lasted Week Trial of the case started last Mon- day morning. Testimony consumed three days and arguments were fin- ished shortly before midnight Fri- day. The jury had come Into court Saturday at 2 p. m. to have parts of the testimony of four witnesses repeated. At 5 o'clock Saturday evening it sent n'ord to Judge E. J. Miller that it was hopelessly in dis- agreement. The court ordered fur- ther deliberation then and again late Saturday night. Reports were that in the Nampri Hparl nf Dpnartmnlft votes ranged KdllltJU ntJdll OT Uepartmeill from acrnlittal to the death penalty. Wood manifested great relief when the verdict was read. Smiling broadly he thanked the Jury and the court and in his excitement started to walk out of the court- room; forgetting that he was in custody. Wood, father of a small boy whose mother is dead, 31 years old. He had resided in the Talpa community about 20 years, as had Fred Brown, whom he admitted slaying with an iron pipe. Murder With Malice By its verdict the Jury found Wood guilty of murder with malice, and thus expressed disbelief In his plea of self defense. The state charged he killed Brown to get a large sum of money he was carrying. The self defense plea had been sup- ported 'n the defense testimony, under questioning of J. K. Baker. Wood's chief counsel, by statements of more than a score of Talpa peo- ple who characterized Brown as a violent ano dangerous man. To controvert this testimony the state brought to the stand Mrs. Will Hale, elderly mother-in-law of Brown, denied Brown hart ever Officials ____ BRONTE July 1 ban- here at p. m. today and fled northward on Highway 70 as Coke county officers pur- sued. Cash drawers T. Youngblood, president; J. T. Harmon, vice president; Of Education, Dean Of Students Selection of Dr. R. A. Collins, spe- cialist In teacher training at South- west Texas State Teachers college for the past two years, as head of the department of education and dean of students of Hardin-Sim- mons university to succeed Dr. D. M. Wiggins, was announced Monday morning by Dr. J. D. Sandefer. president of Hardin-Simmons. Dr. Wiggins Saturday announced his acceptance of the presidency of the Texas College of Mines and Metallurgy at El Paso. Hardin-Simmons Graduate an alumnus of of the class of Dr. Collins rlardin-Simmons, 1912. He holds the degree of Master of Arts from the University of Tex- as, which also conferred upon h'm :he degree of Doctor of Philosophy, "or which he did much of his study n Columbia, University of Call- ornia, and University of Iowa. For nine years Dr. Collins was onnected with the Port Arthur WASHINGTON, July l._ (AP) President Roosevelt's request for legislation to abol. When HOldUp Men Failjish "unnecessary'1 utility hold- In Fffnrt tn I nr-k llniing: comPanies by 1942 in trrort to LOCK up tnrned down day by the house. The vote was 216 to 146 against the president's wishes. Climaxing one of the most bitter j 'legislative disputes in recent years, dits armed with sawed off shot- i the vote was studied for Its renec- guns robbed the First National j tion of pre5ident.s eon. Bank of approximately ?600 trol over the house, It was not a straight-out test, however, as no roll call vote was taken. Administration supporters contended more votes for the presi- dent would have be'n nbtalned If a of the bank i teer, kept. The vote was on whether to adopt were rifled after four officials the senate provision to eliminate in seven years holdlAg companies con- sidered by the securities commis- sion to be "unnecessary." Mrs Carrie Williams, cashier, j That carrled m lt" senate by j one-vote margin. The house inter- and Virginia Youngblood, commerce committee voted in- bookkeeper, were forced to lie' tne securities commls- 1 slon discretionary authority. on the floor. After final passage of the utili- With loot in hand the ,tne flsht the "death sentence" provision will be trans- bers then forced the officials into the bank vault were una- ble to lock it. Officials quick- quickly spread the alarm, and Walker Good, deputy sheriff, followed the bandit Chevrolet coach with yellow it sped out of town. Sheriff Frank Percifull of Robert Lee, short time later, was organizing a posse to join the search for the robbers. j The men, one dressed in kha- ki and one in blue denim, en- tered the bank from the rear. Olairine Gilbreath, 14-year-old girl who entered the bank while the robbery wa, gress was forced to lie on the flooi with the officials. ferred to a conference committee to adjust differences between the sen- ate and the house. Then; It may either be rejected Mountainous Tijeras Canyon Country Is Being Combed ALBUQUERQUE, N. M., July for the missing tour- ists extended today from the moun- jn pro-1 talnous Tljeras canyon country of Mexico to the painted desert of DEATH TAKES MRS. CONLEY Mother of City Secretary to Be Buried Tuesday public school system and was prln- wno Blast In Indian Mine Kills 52 CALCUTTA. India, July Additional reports from Bagdigl colliery Ipal of the high school tficre sev- ral years. The Port Arthur system Is considered one of the great pub- lic school systems of the' south by educators. For the past two years Dr. Col- lins has been on the faculty of Mrs. M. K. Conley, resident of Abilene for 25 years, died at her home- 1616 North Sixth street, Mon- I threatcned her or his .wife, with mornirig at o'clock. Her See DR. COLLINS, Patfe 10, Col. 2 whom he had lived at the Hale See WOOD TRIL 9. Col. 8 lnvolvcd slnce ,Rte )n 1934, Surviving Mrs. Conley are her husband, a daughter. Mrs. Robert OLD TIMERS OF RAH8E HAVE CHICAGO, July es- dealings In Chicago, described today by Hugh Croxton, chairman of the brofcers division of the real I estate board, as having been "more calm thai: the doldrums for four years" are once more assuming important proportions. "Business for the real estate man lias started coming through the of- fice door once croxton saw, Organization Now Has More Than One Thousand Mem- -and while there Isn't a boom. It's 50 much better than It was we're be- ginning to feel human." The best Index to conditions, he y in Bihar province, following TpvHS today, raised a death I In Houston For Annual Sessions total to 52 miners. An undeterm- ined number were Injured. Fhree Violent Deaths Sunday In San Angelo i Talls uPncld See WOMAN DIES, Page 9, Col. 8 Arkansas Sales bers: Stamford All Ready For Three Day Celebration see REAL ESTATE, page 10, col. 3 Two Are Killed As Autos Crash JONESVILLE, July liam Jernlgnn, of Elyslan Fields, Texas, and an unidentified Shreve- port womr.n, were killed In a head- on collision of automobiles at a point ne.lr here this morning. Threr other persons were injured, Including James Tucker of Waskom, Texas, Tom Black Hill of Deberry, Texas, and an unidentified white man who was rldlr.g In the Jerrjl- fffln cnr. man, driving the cur In which ffie unidentified woman was riding, refuser! to slve cither his name or that or the dead woman to fi-jthorl- tles at Texn-s, the dead and Injured were Urst brought. By VIOLETA T. MAHOOD STAMFORD, July ar- rivals to the sixth annual Texas Cowboy Reunion are already throng- Ing the streets of Stamford and the city Itself is in gcla dress for the three-day celebration when pio- neers of the range and cowboy: from the ranches hold sway. The reunion opens Tuesday. Activities are built around ranch life and ranch atmosphere with the Idea of preserving the best of west- ern tradition In this yearly celebra- tion. Old-time cattlemen, members nf the Texas Cowboy Reunion as- sociation, meet here year after year and their descendnnts and other modern day cowboys contest for honors In the rodeo arena. The olntimers' organization, cori- posed of pioneer cowboys and Llemen, who saw actual service more' than 35 years ago, lias a mem- bership of 01 er l.OTO. Quite n few members have qualified since the Reunion Insi, year, but no new membeis ccn ousllfy rlnrlnir the re- union dates. It has been announced, though active members pay annual dues during that time. All members In good ore Issued badges which entitles them to free admission to the rodeo anri grandstand, a chuck wagon dinner fach dr.y. aJmlsslo.i to the cowboy dance each night and other cour- tesies. John Olst of Odessa Is president pr the oldtlmers. serving now lor the second term. His successor will be named at t'.ie Reunion this yenr. Clvde Burnett, Benjamin, Is first vice-president; Joe Mathews, Al- bany, second vice-president; A. J Swenson, Stamford, treasurer; C. E Coombes, Stamford, secretary; W H. Cousins, Dallas, historian; V. Hit-Me, Crov.'cll, range boss; Fretl Franklin, Outlirle, wagon boss; Vlr- gll Hudson, Hnskcll, horse wrang- ler. The directors are Lewis Ackers, Abilene, chairmnn; Dor: Ellis, Spur; I John C. Diinu Fort Worth: Tom See REUNION. Paie 10, Col. 1 HOUSTON, July -Two thousand lawyers and jurors are expected here for annual conven- tions of the Texas Bar association and kindred groups opening tomor- row and Wednesday. H. C. Pipkin of Amarlllo, presi- dent of the State Bar assoclatlcn. led a vanguard of attorneys and jurists Into the city yesterday to prepare for what they believe will be the largest, gathering ever held by th bar of Texas. The Junior Bar association, with a membership of approximately 300. will convene tomorrow, with its presid-nl, Alto B. Cervln of Dallas, presiding. Thff most important mat- ter to come befoii; the organization will be the question of affiliation with the senior association. Mexico Grounds American Fliers MEXICO CITY. July Approxlmately 50 American aviators were grounded today by a ruling of the department of commerce that only native Mexicans might operate commercial airplanes henceforth. Some of the Americans affected own their own commercial planes, but will not be able to fly them. A law stipulating that pilots must be Mexicans has been In effect sev- eral years but had not been en- forced. SAN ANGELO, July murder and suicide and an :u'lomo- bile wreck claimed the live-, of three persons here Sunday. W B. Clifton, 63, shot srd killed his estranged wife. Mrs. Rebecca Ollfton, about 40. and then turned tne gun on himself. They had been 'separated about a month. Verdict r murder and suicide was returned today. Miss Cleona Harding. 19, oi Eden was killed Instantly and L. M Reese also ol Eden, was seriously inlureil when their car overturned near San Angelo last night. They were en route here to attend a show, Haskell Precinct Again Favors Beer HASKfeLL, July re- turns reaching here this morning that Precinct 4 of Hnskell county had voted a third time In favor Df sale of beer. Heturns from the largest box, Sagcrton, and the next largest, Bunk'jT Hill, gave beer a majority of 101 to '12. The vote In the other tioxes, Plalnvlcw and McConnell could not change the result. The proclnc' voted wet In Sep- tember, 1933 and this was the sec- ond election since then on petitions by opponents of btw The precinct exierds along the Kaskell- Jones county line to thn ou'.sklrtJ, Stamford, In Jones county. LITTLE HOCK, Ark., July TK: supreme courl today de- allty of the sales tax. The action removed the Inst obstacle to state collections o[ the two per cent levy which went Into effect last mid- night. Fines Paid In City Court Total First Half of Year Fines paid In corporation courl here through the first half of thi year totaled according to C. M. Cooley, city treasurer. Receipts from fines fov May ant June represented of the amount. Fines accounted for dur- ing the fiscal year ended April 30 Transient Camps Will Be Closed AUSTIN, July sient centers that have been main- tained by relief forces at Austin Beaumom, College station and BlR Sprlnp will be closed immediately J. C. Bl-ssot, acting director of the division announced today. Transients formerly received at Austin and Beaumont will be ab- sorbfd bv -Snn Antonio and Houston. Bit? Spring's applicants will be rout- vislottfi al Dallas anri Aniarlllo will be maintained. Transients be concentrated and will be registered with the na- tional re-employment service. CITY'S LAKES WELL FILLED Two Reservoirs Now Contain Gallons Abilene had stored in her two Abilene and Lake total of billions, 800 millions of gallons or water at the end of the first hair of the year. This was one and n. quarter blllfons more thnn the two lake? contained at the .same date last yepr, ac- cording to computations mode Mon- day morning by City Engineer O. K. Ill addition to the surfcct. supply the city hns an auxiliary supply from the infiltration gallery under- ground below the Lake Abilene dam which is capable of urnlslilnR one and a quartnr million to one nnrt a Sec WATER, Plgc 10, Coi. 8 SIDNEY WOOD IS DEFEATED New Mexico's state police and na- tional guard and Arizona's "Nava- Jo trail readers from tha Indian reservation, followed appar- ently conflicting clues in an at- tempt to find the bodies of Mr. and Mrs. George Lorius and Mr. and Mrs. Albert Heberer of East St. Louis, 111., believed slain for their money the latter part of May. Gov. Clyde Tfngley of New Mexi- co established headquarters herte and personally directed the two- state search for the tourists, last reported alive at Vaughn, N. M., the morning of May 23. "They wero of New Mexi- co; we intend to find their bodies and bring their killer to the governor said. Promising Clues. The most promising clues were found In the Tijeras canyon east of here when searchers came upon the charred remnants of the trav- elers' baggage and personal effects, believed burned by the killer in an attempt to destroy evidence of his crime. Discovery of the ashes refuted See TOURISTS, 10, Col. S Boy 12, Drowns in Lake Near Lamesa LAMESA, July Trultt. 12, son of H. E. Truitt, llv- ng eight mllM east of Lajnesa, was rowncd Inie yesterday in a small ake. Ira was only child. Fimer- ,1 services wers planned today. American Loses To Craw- ford In Quarter Final WIMBLEDON. Eng., July 
                            

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