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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: May 23, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - May 23, 1935, Abilene, Texas                                 ®i)e ^Wlene Bailp jl^eporter  “WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES. WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES’ —Byron  At. VOL. LiV. Full Leased Wires of Associated Press (W) United Press (UP) ABILENE. TEXAS. THURSDAY. MAY 23, 1935— TWELVE PAGES (Evenino Edition of The Abilene Moming News) NUMBER 186  PATMAN BONOS BILL IS KILLED  Legal iSkirmisiiing Begins In Trial Of Sheriff  SIX NAVY FLIERS KILLED IN CRASH  McHenry Troubles All Fixed  With legal and other troubles cleared up, Paul McHenry and his wife, Luella, and their tw'o daughters, Alyce Jane 11, the “inverted stomach girl,’* and Frances, 17, prepared to return from Fall River. Mass.. to their homes—the father to Iowa City, la., the others to Omaha. The parents’ controversy over Alyce’s custody was settled amicably, and they denied they ever were estranged. (AsM>ciated Press photo.)  Royal Romance  HUS IT a  Accident In Mid-Pacific Swells Death List In War Games  RÜCK yiGIli  DS SLOtï  Aged Transient Killed In Many Acres Along Large Highway Accident Streams Menaced Near Tye    With    Overflows  Officers and funeral home directors were continuing Thursday their efforts to identify an aged man who was fatally injured at 9:30 o’clock last night when struck by a truck on the Bankhead highway two miles west of Tye. The body was being held at Laughter Funeral home pending Investigations.  Scores of per.sons, both from Abilene and* Merkel, had called at the funeral home, but only one of them,  George Wasson ot Abilene, recalled having seen the victim. Mr. Wasson Identified the body as that of a man whom he had talked with casually at a Chestnut street shoe shop early Wednesday afternoon. The  man, r tran.sient. told Was.son he       ^    ^____  was from Van Zandt county and ; from the ground yesterday. In many  . Instances the crop was not ready to hee Mi IDFNT, Page 11, Col. 6 harvest. Farmers feared an over-♦ «  Dallas Tot Loses Battle For Lllc  By the Associated Presi.  Flood waters stubbornly receded In many sections of Texas Thursday but the threat of damaging overflows continued in scattered areas The Colorado, Brazoh, Red River and Rk) Grande swirled along menacingly in some spous.  At Wharton the Colorado wa.s still ri.slng, reaching a higher level than the 1929 flow. Residents along the river banks were apprehen&lve but the town itself, located on a 40-foot bluff, wa.- In no immediate danger. Water had found outlets through drainage canals and a heavy loss to crops was feared.  Many farmers In the Wharton territory desperately dug potatoe  ABOARD BATTLESHIP PENNSYLVANIA IN MIDPACIFIC FLEET MANEUVERS. May 23.—()P) ' —Six naval fliers on a mercy flight.; were killed when their huge patrol | plane crashed during the United States fleet maneuvers In mid-Pacific, commanding officers revealed today aboard the flagship Pennsylvania  Part* of Plane Found  The six aviators, forming the crew of the .seaplane 6P7, went to their deaths without knowing what happened, officers said after .shattered remains of the cr?ift had been picked up.  The tragedy occurred Tuesday night but wa.s not disclosed until today after all hope for the men's live.s had been abandoned.  The victims and their home addresses:  Lieut . Harry A Brandenburger. 37. executive officer of the flight squadron, Belleville, III.  Lieut. Charles Jo.seph Skelly, 30,  ^ San Francisco.  ; P. C. Lit«, aviation chief machin-i Ists mate, Ocean View, Va ' Chief Radioman F M. Derry. <no ; address'  P J. Poteau. aviation machinists mate, first class, Wrentham, Mas*.  Q. A. Sharpe, aviation machinists mate, third class, Heavener, Okla.  The tragedy brought the fatalities from the unprecedented maneuvers to eight, aeven of whom have died in airplane crashes. The other died in a colll.sion of destroyers Three airplane.s have been lost In j mid-Pacific during the maneuvers.  ! and four destroyers damaged In j three collisions  t Lieutenant Mat his B. Wyatt was killed when his single-seater fighter cra.shed Into the sea from the aircraft carrier Saratoga. In the destroyer collision Ric+iard Chadwick wa.s lost overboard from the Slcard. Both fatalities occurred k^fore the fleet reached Pearl Harbor frcwn the mainland.  C rash Near .Midway  The 6P7, one of the giant bombing patrol planes tliat made the first hazardous flight from Hawaii to Midway Island, crashed at night  Army Officer . Is Kicked Out  Judge Wilson Defers Action On Motion After Plea to Quash Indictment Is Rejected  WASHINGTON, May 23.—(A*)- master corps, had been on trial for Col. Alexander E. Williams, former the last three days at the army assistant quartermaster general of war college and had sentenced the the army, was found guilty today; officer to be dismissed from the by an army court martial and sen- ; military service. The members of  tenced to be dismissed from the military service.  Colonel Williams was found guilty of ’’soliciting and obtaining a loan of $2,000" in connection with war department contracts from the representative of an automobile lube concern, and of giving false testimony by denying the loan before a  LUBBOCK, May 23. (AP)—  Federal Judge James C. Wilson  today overruled a defense mo- bou.se committee.  tion to quash an indictment    department    s    official    an-  1.    • oi.    w rt , -c nouncement    said;  charging Sheriff W. F, Cato of ..^  Post, Garza county, and three reached flndlng.s of guilty of two of of fellow townsmen with murder the three specifications on which for the machine gun slaying of; cob Alexander E. williams, quarter-Spencer Stafford, federal nar-cotics agent.  Dr L. W. Kitchen, veterinarian,  : Dr. V. A. Hartman, and Tom Mor-i gan, a farmer deputized by Cato 1 shortly before the shooting, are also I on trial charged with the death of ' Stafford at Post last February 7. j Judge Wilson deferred action on a defen.se motion to “remove this’ cau.sc to Garza county where the ' alleged offen.se occurred”  In arguing the motion. Jack Bln-ion of the legal firm of McLean,,  Scott and Binion, Fort Worth, coun- i sei for Cato and Morgan, said no I inconvenience would b« ctuatd by the transfer.    ;  “In any event, the removal would ^  , not prevent the trial or selection of | a fury,** Jud®» Wilson ruled, j Selection «f a jury was ordered' continued pending a decision on the motion,  A third motion, asking that .state i  the court unan mously Joined in a recommendation of clemency on account of the long and faithful service of Col. Williams.  •’’rhe specifications on which Col. Williams was found guilty were the soliciting and obtaalning of a loan of $2,000 while he was a brigadier general and assistant to the quarter-ma.ster general In charge of the transportation dlvi.sion of the quartermaster general’s office in November, 1933. from the represenlail'/e an automobile tube concern  See OIFICER, Page 12. Col. 4  Grissom, Rafliff Get Court Places  Former Moved Up To The  11th Civil Appeals Court Bench at Eastland  Vacancies In two West Texas courts—one appellate and the othar dlBtrlct—were filled TRiirisdmy moming on appointments by Governor James V. Allred.  Promoted to the Eleventh court of civil appeals, sitting at Eastland,  PRINCESS INGRID PRINCE FREDERIK  ,    „ was Clyde Grissom. Haskell, Judge  court rules and practices of allow-    district court since 193L  Ing coun.sel to question Jurors sep- takes the a.ssoclate Justiceship  ROYAL PAIR WED FRIDAY  Ingrid of Sweden Is Bride of Frederik of Denmark  STOCKHOLM, May 23 —i/L The pre-miptli-1 activitie;; of Princess Ingrid and Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark reached their climax today with a reception in city hall in honor oi visiting royalty and other celebritie.L Tonight the royal couple will attend a gala performanc*’ in the Roy-  Pcace Overtures al opera house, their last public ap-    _pearance before the wedding 'ere-  monles tomorrow morning which will pla.ce Ingrid In direct line of  arately, also was overruled by the, court. Judge Wilson questioned the venire as a whole.  A special venire of 80 wa* reduced to 45 by excu.ses and disquallfl-rations. Two veniremen were disqualified for having fixed opinions, and eight for having scruple.s against infliction of the death penalty.  Tlie motion to qua.sh charged the indictment was faulty, because “ic does not allege that at the time of the alleged shooting the defendants knew Stafford was a member of the internal revenue department and was acting In line of his duty."  “In event of conviction that might be a material matter in determining the punishment," ruled the  See CAIO TRIAL, Page 12, Col. 4  See PLANE CRASH, Page II, Col. 7  Italy Turns Down  DALLAS, May 23 —(P>—Joe Fields Ijove Jr. a month old foday had lost the one chance In five sur-geon.s gave him for life.  The infant apparently had recovered from a unique operation performed a few minutes after birth when pneumonia and other complications cau.sed his death late ye.s-terd.%y,  The bitbv was born with moot of vital organ, out-ide it; body, because tlie abdominal wall had failed to unite After an operation to place the orgunv in their proper piace. surgeon.- said he had one chance in five to live  See CLOUDS. Page 12. Col. 4  PRALL RFAPPOINTED  WASHINGTON. May 23.    -  President Roosevelt today reappointed Anmng 6. Prall. of New York, to the federal commuriicatlous commission for a term ot .seven year.s Prall, former member ot the house, now is serving as chairman of the commission.  GENEVA, May 23.~'.T>'—Premier Mussolini of Italy was understood today to have rejected Anglo-French s^cce.sslon a;- Denmark's next queen.  British Recruit Huge Air Force  suggestions for a compromise mediation procedure betwaen Italy and Ethiopia.  As a result. Capi. Anthony Eden. British Lord Privy Seal and Pierre Laval. French foreign minister, occupied them.selve.s in attempt* at obtaining a new method of solving the dispute between Italy and Ethiopia.  NO TRACE OF UTTLELONE LOST FLIERS YANK IN RACE t  King GuciHf was host last niiht at a musical soiree in the Royal Palace attended by two other European monarchs and 800 additional guests, many of royal or nobk* birth.  The wedding ceremony will oc performed at 11:30 a. m, tomorrow in Storkyrkaii, Stockholm's oldest church. The only attendant^ for the bridal couple will be two little Norwegian prlnce.vse.s. Ragnhild 5, »«kina and Astrid, 3. They will stand at the altar a; flower girls.  After the wedding the couph uill depart for Denmark on bwrd the Danish rojal yacht under esi uii of squadron of DaMsii torjieUo tx/ats  Search In The Clarksville Defending British Champ to  AUtir', «ad v.cin!iy rioud, i^rohabb ihundersìt-.i-'t; t. r,.¡snt an-', fti.;»., »cgnt ly  Wr.    1.    We.-t of nxi'it    n¡ST (Í!un  rêri    .    ..1 t. t ,:'>I Hfid Knday. pr..b-  «fcly >1    .».'rs lu Panliandi«.  Ea»'    T-vi»    y.ust of lOijiS    RitfîUia)!  ( loud », and F ' and o  'fia  i\  O ind»rî'-.-_-îfd tonzgru '*oisr in nurtnwtat >■n^ tonight  T,nip#ratUfa» W -a Thurs  \  Vi"  . ■/  i ■J  4  Í.  «  7  H •  (.1 •1  M 1  N.,o  ■.iinrt»?  1> tii  H4  Si  »3  ai  7,%  7i  71  g)c  Vr n.  tr.  RaUUva  humym» .-*0%  «?•  »1%  H m 46 «S S7 et  r.f.  M  «î>  M  73  7*  Sn  «S*  Area Is Abandoned  SAN ANTONIO. May 23 A’ -Searchers from the air and ground today had filled to sight an air-pliue which left Muskogee, Okla.. for Shreveport. La.. Sundnv The ship, a Broois Fi«id i iane, was carrying Lieut. Wendell O Holliday and his mechanic, Prnate Ira Hicks,  At the time it left Mu.skogee to flv by Shreveport and then ba/k to its home field much of the territory was flooded by week-end rain.s.  I>Qfens of planes from Brtoks Field here and Barlcsdale. La . joir -ed the search.  Search for the plane near CiariOs-ville, Texa*. wa* pushed on land yesterday after reports .said a ship had been heard and sighted flying low in that vicinity Sunday.  The search was abandoned after a p. rfi of 25 person* had n'.ade a thorough viirvey of the terii'twv Fear that the .vjn-i h?d fnih i, itco flood waierfe was expreteed by olfi-,  Quarter Finals  Officials to Have Bullet-Proof Cars  ST   ------I    BUFFALO.    N. Y,. May 23    ' t ~  ANNE S'^N-THE-SEA, Eng., ■ Bullet-proofed over every .square  LONDON, May 23-'D llie air ministry opened an enlarged recruiting sLatiou for tlie Royal Air Force in downtown London today ar Great Britain pushed her program to meet Germany ,s challenge with a three-fold expansion oi her home defense air strength.  The ministry tmnounced it wa. “most vigorou.s step.s to keep abreast of the ai rforce expsn-sion plans.  Then other recruiting statioiu. are to be e*tabli.shed in other parts of England and in Scotland, Ubtcr and Wales.  I’heir purfX'.re was described as being to make the way clear for prcanpt handling of the npphca-UM)«" needed to provide 2..500 additional pilot* and 20,000 skilled and unskilled workmen.  made vacant by elevation of Justice W. P. Leslie to the chief justiceship. Ijcslle was moved up after Chief Justice J. E. Hickman wa.s. yesterday, appointed on the supreme court commi.*«ion of appeals New Judge of the 39th district court Is Dennis P. Ratliff of Haskell. former member of the Texa.s legislature. He will take the oath on Grissom’s return from Austin. The court Is this week winding up its Haskell county tr’rm with a special Judge, Walter MnrchLson. presiding The New Judge«  Grl.s.som is 38. a native of Alvord, Wise county, but a resident of Haskell .since he wa.s three year.s old. He received hl.s higher education In Texas Chrl.stlan university and the University of Texas. He practiced law for a time In Fort Worth, then moved to Ha.skell, and then to Wichita FalLs, where he wa< in private practice when, in 1927, Gover-  See JLDGFS. Page 12. Col. 4  Testimony Begins In Trimble Trial  Issue Is Not Yet Dead; Compromise of Some Sort to Be Offered Immediately  WASHINOTON, May 23,— (UP)—The senate today sustained President Roosevelt’s veto and killed the Patman bonus bill. The vote was 54 to override and 40 to sustain the president.  Champions of the $2,200,000.-000 (B) measure battled to the last during the dramatic ses-sion. But they could not win the two-thirds majority necessary to have the senate join the house in orver-riding the veto.  New Plan Expected.  The votes sgain.'.t the Patman plan dpflnttaly killed It for this session, but did not down the bonus Issue.  Bonus supporters planned soon to offer a plan giving Mr Roosevelt a chance to pay the bonus either through use of regular trea.sury financing. through use of work-rellef funds, or by kxsuing United States notes. They believed offering of those alternatives might win votes of some, senators who opposed the mandatory currency Issuance provg-' .xtona of the Patman bill.  President Roosevelt had warned that the Patman bill would set Uie jnat^ a a dangeroue nr^rre The toniF of ml* veto IndtnriW he also —    would    reject    any    other    plan for im-  Mr<i R J PqfDQ Mnfhor    fuu    ca*h    payment,  mih. n. J. tsies, moiner The proposed strategy of the bonus forces to offer their alternative plan a* a rider on an administration bill may gravely cewnpllcate the new deal's legislative program for the remainder of the session.  of Abilenians. Was Settler In 1876  LAND, May 2$-<T..The .state wa.s ready today to take te.stimony in the ca.se of L. E Trimble, charged with slaying W R Tomlinson. Menard county commissioner.  Tlie Jury was completed in a session last night after three days had been consumed In questioning pro.^-pective Juror.s The TYimble case was iran.sfcrretl here on a change of venue.  Mrs. R J. Estes, 82. mother of Dr. J. M Este.s and Mrs. R Van Bailey, i died Thursday morning at 7 o'clock in the home of Dr. and Mr* Bailey, 1358 Amarillo street, where she had been confined to bed for two months  One of the earliest settlers of Callahan county, Mrs. E.xtes lived at her home at Clyde until her healtli ; began to fall late In 1934 Since that ; time she had been here with her son and daughter Surviving are three other children, Mrs Claude Thaxton of Littlefield. Mrs. Raymond Cleminer and Mrs Cleo Penny of Clyde; two .sl.ster.s, Mrs Ben Mason of Herm-lelgh and Mr.s Mollie Anderson of Big Spring; twelve grandchildren and several greatigrandchlldren. All of the children were at the bedside when their mother died The grandchildren are Dr Jack Este.s, Jr . and Dr Bob E.stes, Abl-I lene; Gene and James Estes and . Mr.s. Fay Adams, Lo.s Angele.s; Lu-i llle and Bobble Bailey, Miss Myrtle Bell Merrick. Abilene; Jack tJlemmer and Este.s Merrick. Clyde; Earline Merrick. Tyler; Betty Alice Thaxton. Littlefield  Funeral triday The funeral service will be held Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the Clyde Baptist church Rev J Henry Littleton of Hamlin, former Clyde pastor, and Rev V W Tatum, pastor, will officiate for the rites Burial will be marie in the Clvde 'Tine-lery beside the grave of Mr Estes,  her PIOM.tlt. Page 12. Col. 5  ARKANSAWERS REUNION TO BE HELD SUNDAY AT BRONTE PARK  WASHINGTON. May 23.-JT*— As Patman bonus bill supporters conceded thetr campaign to override President Roosevelt’s veto was last, barring last-minute changes. Senator Borah <R-Ida> today urged the senate to pas.s the $2,200.000.000 inflationary measure  lAing Concede« Ixmw "f make no concealment, I offer no apology." he ^id, “for the belief that the country need.s a larger volume of money, a larger volume of currency. For that reason I believe this bill Is in harmony with the interests of the entire country ’’  A* the momentous vote, expected later In the afternoon, neared. Senator Ixmg <D-La>, who had been optimistic of overriding the veto, predicted the administration would win by five vote*  Democratic leader* said so fsr as thiy knew they had not lost a single one of the 35 votes cast against the bill two week* ago and predicted the final roll call would show almo*t 40 vote* to uphold the president.  Packed galleries listened listleasly to a rather cut and dried debate until Borah took the iioor. Veter-an.s. some in khaki, were sprinkled Uiruugh Uie lluuug.  Speaking calmly. Borah stressed the monetary features of the bill.  "I realize and fully appiaciate the value of the measure to the veterans,' but I believe the effen upon the country would be only eecondary to beneficial re*ult*." he said Louis Ward, representative of Father Coughlin, listened to the debate from a senate gallery.  Borah explained he had not supported originally the theory that v.Qiigre** *hould rompensaue the Aoldters with $125 a day for the service they had performed “for entering into the hell hole* of Eu-  May 23.—(4*)—Pressed all the way, William Lawiion Little, Jr, of San Francisco, the defending champion, defeated James I. Black, former Welsh champion, tw«» up this afternoon to gam the quarter-final round of the Bi tish amateur golf championship The last three of Little'a compatriot« were eliminated during the course of the two round» of the fourth day of the championship CapUin Bullock-Webster of Mor-terey, Calif,, pa.ssed fmm the tournament this morning losing to Morton Dykes, 4 and 2. and then Rich-ard M (Dickt Chapman and Dan R Topping of Cireeiiwlch, Conn, were victim« of the fifth round after victorioui momtiig matches Chapman conquered Olav Aua-treng 6 and 4 in the fourth round and bowed out to Erl' Fiddian runner-up 111 the 19H2 < h«'npioiiship. by 2 and i thii,    onn Toiiping  8m GOLF. Page U, CaL 8  Fof Palmer Trial  inch of their fcurfe.cfv. two llmou- ,    I..«*«,  sines have been *ent to Washington i tilflOl III JUry DUX for the uae of President Room celt and J. Edgar Homer, chief of the Inveattgatlon division of the department of justice. It was learned la*t mght.  The cars are equipped with bullet-proof gle.ss in windshields and windows, and the bodies have been reinforced with heavy steel sheeting to make them safe against almost any kind of bullet The marhine.s are capable of iraking 110 mile* an hour,  EDINBURG May 23.= 4’ Eight lurora were in the box today for the trial of Ruhard A. Palmer, ex-convict cliarged with killing Peiry A. Calkins, Houston salesman. March , cowboy band.  30.    Dr    Sandefer’i  Talk By J. D. Sandefer and Sacred Music Concerts By rope lo rescue civUltatl'yn.’’ but the  n    government anyhow had entered  Hardin-Simmons Cowboy Band Feature Program ,hat obligation  Ridicule« I imr idea  With hla hand* resting on his  hee BOM b. Page II. Col. 3  Galveston Given Next K. C. Session  Rosponse.s will be made by W H. Jobe of 8vi eel water and B M. (iramltng. superintendent of the Robert l/ee M tiool Speakers for the day iiu’lude W D Holcombe. San Angelo. Frank Van Horn, editor of the Christoval Obterver: Cieorge F, Jones. San An- j talk, “Doe* Rclig- gelo; and C R. Owen, siipertntend-1  Fourth annual Arkan*awers reunion will be held at Hearn park In Bronte Sunday with an all-day program featuring an addre** by Di J D Sandefer. president of Hard'n-S.mmons university and ascred concerts by the Ha ritn-Simmoii!  James McAli*ter, also an ex-con- ion Have a Place in Um? Ideals of vlct. ha« been tried and convicted in True American PatrloU*m?" is slai-  NAMID « I.MLNNI4L CHIKI AUSTIN. May 23 L John V Singleton of Waxanachie today was appointed chief of the centeiu lal division of the *tate board of control Singleton will Mipervise con-traet* for ' on*iruetion of certain centennial bnjldmg' under a iw pa*&ed b' the leg).slamre spproprL ating $3.006,000 m state aid for the celebration.  ent of the Bronte schools.    TAYLOR.    May    ^    '  Besides the programs by the Cow- ; Knights of Columbus will hold their  the case. CalklnK w a* slain and hi*, ed at 11:45 a m I he Cowboy band | boy band Ihe mu*ical program will  body left on a .tide rcmd near liere wui wpj-««r for a short prcqiram    at    consist of a song by a Bronte    Hap-1 was    o^iaeo    .^esteraay  McAlister admitted the slaying, say-jll io a. m, apMd for an hwir of    *a-    tist Sunday srliool quartet, a    duet i of    t”*»’    «nnual    meeting here  Ing It occurred sfter Calkin* had | cred music at 3 40 p. m    by Delbert Ray Coalaon and    Cecil  given him and Palmer a ride. | The big outdo<jr event o)»eiis at 10 lJk»yd CXiiU*on of Brante. numbers   .....I    a m. with the uigiiig of “Ameri- by the Bronte schocd Junior band  ta ’ led by Mord ru< ker of Winter* and rhythm baud, duel h\ Mrs J Following the uevotional by Rev O. Phipps and Miss Alma Phipps of V/allace N Duiuon p;, jm ot the Crews, duet ov H. H Ckioic. and Ikl-Br mte MethodiM church R' \ l ew- ilh Ratliff of Coiemati 'a/red num 1.' Stuckev and I T Yn i.gbkKMj bfiv b’^ the Proctor *cPool girl* vir-  W'lll welcome the M.*itor. m behalf    -------  Of BrohU and ths churches th#r«.|    •••    llZLNlolii,    Fage    W.    CM.    I  * .MAIL ,Ml.hhLN(»KR KII.LLII DENTON. Mav 23    ■    T', O c:  Hort'xn, 86, mstil me**enger at Arg.vie, near here w«* ui.visnth killed today whfi: *ruck bv s I’ort Worth-bound paswrrifer tram at the  ‘Argyli depot.  OI fleer» re-elected were Deputy. William P, Oallaghui of Laredo: »ecretarj', t) J Krejenbuhl of Fort Wurth- master foiirth degree Thoma* Kehoe of Houas<m; warden. W J lurch of Port Arthur; publiritv chsirman C W. Ctabbe of Ho»t*ton, ireaMirer, J M. Weinrapfel of Muen«er, advouiif, £ O, Wood oi Msa Antonin.   

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