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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: May 21, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - May 21, 1935, Abilene, Texas                                 ^bilme Bail? ^I^cportcr  “WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES’ —Byron  VOL. L!V. Full Leased Wires of Associated Press (<^) United Press (UP)  ABILENE. TEXAS, TUESDAY. MAY 21. 1935—TEN PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abilene Morning News)  NUMBER 184  Garza Liquor Case Goes To Trial  Swollen Texas Streams Overflow In New Areas  Not a House In Town Escapes Texas Twister  Not a single residence in the towTi of Tea#rue escaped damaRe. and many »ere demolished, when a vIcloSt    'truTZ cilniiunUy. Th, phMo b»lo», made at Te.*« a oil, of 4,000 pop,, atlon .aa  typical of many scenes over a large section of the state, where storms killed several persons. (Associated  Press Photo).  ][H[). Word Passed That President Will Veto Any Full Bonus Plan  WASHINGTON. May 21.—(A‘)— | The word was passed in informed circles today that President Roosevelt had asserted that, after vetoing the inflationary Patman bonus bill, he also would reject any other pro-  bill had been killed and added that he would be glad to “contribute” toward that end.  “But I don't know whether it is possible or not,” he said.  Whether Robin.son. an administration leader, had in mind some  Bottom Land Evacuated; posal for full and Immediate cash compromi.se that would not call for  payment of the $2,200,000,000.  Thi.s disclosure shared interest _    .    r- II-    iu    ^ remark by Senator Robinson  UGniSOn, rBlliriQ In thG of Arkansas, the democratic leader  holding out apparent hope to those who want to sec some bonus legislation passed.  Red River Rising At  Wichita Falls Section  payment In full immediately was not disclosed. But the White Hou.se was de.scribed in informed quarters a.s oppc^ed to any plan for .such full payment.  These informants gave this version of the vl.sit the bonus “steering  School Funds Take Investment Losses  JANE ADDAMS ON DEATH BED  Physicians Abandon Hope For Aged Sociologist  CHICAGO. May 21—(UP'—Ml.-^s Jane Addami.. W4>rid famous aoci-oioglst who was operated upon Saturday for an abdominal ailment, was reported dying today.  A nephew, Prof. James Weber Linn of the University of Chicago, said he was informed by three phy- | alelan» that “her life can be n>eas- ; ured in hourR.”  A bulletin Issued by the physicians said'  “MIsr Addams Is Imlng ground rather rapidly and constantly. She la conscious at times but is much weaker "  All of the doctoff» remained at her side, occasionally u.slng heart stimulants. but profe.s.-ecP v ' 'Pe of saving their pat lent'.s life. Miss Addams is 75 years old and ha.s .suffered for years from a heart ail-nient and bronchial trouble.s. She apparently weathered her Saturday operation with excellent strength but weakened suddenly early today and lost ground steadily thereafter Dr James A. Britton, her personal phvsiclan. was summoned to Pa. ‘i-avant hospital and Immediately called two consulting physic .a ns. Dr Arthur H Curtis and Dr Charles A Elliott  A bulletin issued a few minutes after their conference at 4 a. m, said her condition was • crmcal ■*  Special House Committee Calls For an Immediate Change In Policy  Seeks Support For FDR In Plan to Extend Act Two Years  WASHINGTON, May 21.—(TP)— Plunging into the bitter congres-  AUSTTN, May 21 —</!'•—A spec ial committee of the houiw of repre-  «nt.uv,. r^porUd tod.y th.t « .„„uln.dn, NR A  permanent school funo were au«o-    ,    ^    „  luu.ly worthi™ • .nd «,lm.l»d tht    Rop«.-  actual market value of all the bonds  By The Associated Press Rehabilitation work in flood and tornado-torn Texas counties where the known dead stood at 13, was rushed today as swollen streams continued to pound levees and overflow lowlands.  Appeal for Fund»    !  Howard Bonham. repre»entative' of the Red Cro.»i>, said last night the : organization had appropriated $5,- j 000 for emergency needs, adding that Governor James V. Allred had authorized the Red Cross to make an appeal for contributions of $30,- ■ 000 to carry on the relief work. | Eleven Red Cros.s workers were sent la.st night to the variou.s flood and tornado-damaged sections to expedite rehabilitation work.  The Red Crav. reported that a survey showed that 400 homes were de.stroyed or damaged by floods and .storms In Texa.s and that approximately 900 famille;; were ,seriou.sly alfected by the w/eek-end di.sasters.  Texa.-^^' T'c 'i: de-vi »a- raleefl to 13 yrptcrday when I D. Red, 30, wfl.s drow'iied in (lie TYinity river near Trinity and Edward David.son.  He .said yesterday he would like to committee" of legislators paid ycs-  . ee .some bonu.s legislation “worked out and pa.s.sed’’ after the Patman  terday to Pre.sident Roosevelt In a vain attempt to get him to change  his mind about vetoing the Patman bill tomorrow;  Mr. Roosevelt said he would be glad to receive, read and consider Ihelr statement urging him to sign the bill, but that he could not sign it. Then somebody a.sked:    "Will  you .sign any bill for full cash payment of the bonus?”  The an.swer wa.s .said to be an emphatic “no.”  Aftei thl.s se.ssion. congres.sional leader.s pu.shed ahead with their plans for a joint .se.sslon of the two hou.scs at 12;30 p. in., Ea.Jcni Standard Time, tomorrow, at which Mr. Roo.sevelt will read his veto of the Patman bill  A. J. Holman. Formerly Garza Deputy, Fights Charge: Negro Testifies For U. S.  s  SCftLES  Texas Cotton Rate System Unchanged  Schedules In Works Program Range From $19 To $94 a Month  Railroad Commission Decision Climaxes Long Fight Of Compresses  AUSTIN, May 21—The railroad commlsKlon today reaffirmed that iUs carload rate .sv.stcm, appli-'  WASHINGTON. May 21—(/P.—  Declining to enter any controversy over reduction of paymcnt.s to labor , cable to the ti'an.sportatlon of cotton  in Texas, was not. unlawful.  The de<'Usioii climaxed • bittei  and other pha.ses of the $4.000.000,-OOO work program. Secretary Icke,s •said today the PWA liourly wage rate would be maintained on PWA projects.  “Every man has a right to a per-' non T^pinion." wa.s Ickes' only comment on attack; at the new wage .schedule by William Green, presl-  veU’.s two-year ext4*n.sion plan among little bu.sine.s.smen. wage I at 70 per cent of par.    earners and housewives  The book value of the bonds was !    former    recovery    admlni.strator  ' listed at $40,094.480 and grand total, appealed to them last night to tell  i Nev.  investments at $41,412,851.  The report quoted a member of the board of education and the state superintendent of public In-  thelr senator.« the blue eagle is not “ a political hot poker” He suggested that they .send petitions “giving facts.”  Laying aside for the moment his  berg, NRA’s pre.sent chief, John.son turned his vocabulary on the organisation’s critics in a radio ad-dre.ss last nighi “The charge of monopoly comes from monopoli.sis. that of oppression from oppressors, that of regl-  struction as stating that, in their j differences with Donald R. Rlch-Judgment. the school fund had lost hundreds of millions of dollars because no provlsltm was made for accurately surveying school lands or to require oil coinpanlefi to make an exact mineral acountlng The report stated that unless In-ve.Htment pollcie.s of the board of education are changed “it is reasonable to a.s.sume x x x it will not be very long before the permanent •school fund will be completely invested In bonds which are clthei* worthies.^ or at least of questionable value ”  The inquiry concerned chiefly in-ve.stmcnt.s in refunding bond.s.  Recommendation was made that the board of education be a.sked to i ea.se immediately purcha.se of refunding bonds, that the b<mrd be provided with a bond expert, that a full time attorney be employed to collect moneys due the fund and that steps be taken to reclaim the  000 procram, announced la.st night, ranges Lom $19 to $94 a month Ickes indicated there might be a change in hours worked on PWO proieets.  •T think the PWA wage will cer-talnlv be maintained on permanent structure.s such as buildings and bridges." he said, “but hours will depend unon whether we have to work on double shifts ”  He added the exi.sting 30-hour week on PWA proiect.s might be continued, or “we might have to go to 40 hours 'the basic number of hours fixed in the schedule an-  isee NK A, Page 9. f ol. 8  Spanish Pilot Over Atlantic  Choose Jury In Trial ol Trimble  LLANO, Mav 21 - -P -Two jurors were .selected Mondry for the trial of I. E Trimble, on trial for the slaying of W R Tomlinson. Menard county ranchman.  Atlornejs expressed belief the jury would be completed tomorrow. The defense Uidicated Tomlinson, a former Texas rancher, would plead self defeni>e  MADRID May 21    With    a  picture of hi.s childlKXKl iweelheart in a p<x kel ne.ir his heart, Juan Ignacio Pombo, vouthful Spanish aviator, wa.s .soaring over the South Atlantic todav in hi.« powerful plane, the Santander.   _ _______ .    _    His immediate objective was Na-  schooi lands unlawfully appropriat- i Ul. Brazil; his ultimate destination ed and that an accounting for mm- ; Mexico. D. F. vlnue he hopes to  persuade comely Eleana Rivero, whom he knew a.s a child in Santander. to become his bride.  Pombo was repoilcd in radio dispatches to have taken off from Bathurst. Gambia. West Africa, at 1 IR a m. fi M T «8 15 P m yesterday. Eastern Standard time» He -.’.a.s a.ssured of favo!,tble weather < nndiiions Tlie 21-vear-old fhcr expected to negotiate the 1.800-mile hop in about 15 hours.  If foned down sliort of his goal, he believed he might land on the Island of Pernando Noronha. 250 miles of Natal.  erais removed be required.  The departmental appropriation ' bill, pending before the governor, provides for a bond expert and attorney    I  ♦ ♦  Choice Fat Hoas Reach «10 High  CHICAGO. Mil 21 UP> Choice fat hogs reached a to|) of $10 per hundred pounds at the Chi cago stock yardc today. It wh‘ the highest price paid here since Oct 20. 1030   ___    dent of the American Federation of  20,"oi *BuTfalo7red in a    Senator    McCarran <D-  pital after he had crashed into a wa.shed-out bridge.  Red wa.s swimming with a number of frlend.s when he ventured too far into the river J. V. Morton of Burkburnett who was feared drowned after he was reported to have fallen into the water as he walked along a Red river bridge when it colla p.sed, returned home yesterday. He had been marooned on the Oklahoma side of the river  1'wo Missing Two persoas still' were ml.s.>ing at Burkbunictt They were m an automobile which plunged Into the Red river when the bridge collup.«ed.  Within two feet of the dangerou.s stage, the Red river north of Denison was 23 feet and still n.sing.  Parmer; in the lowlands were warned to withdraw- to higher ground. ;  Hundreds of acres already were under water However. Wichita Falls and Pari.s reported the Red river within lu banks again in their .section;  At Burkburnftt Batten I) 131 Artillery of the Wichita Fall; National Guard unit, stood gus!-! at ' the wa^iip-d-ouf free bridge <uid work soon was to be .started on a temporary bridge by Texas and Ok-lahcmia authorities The bridge will be ready foi trafili Sunday.  The crest of the Brazos river pa *-ed Valley Junrlioti early today At Wellborn, a few miles below Br'. aii,  , the river was three miles wide and ' rising. The Trinity flooded into lowlands near Liberty but damáge  I See H.OOUS, Page 9. ( ol. 7  Flood Control Moves Spurred  contest between interior and port. The Chinese pres.s reported today coUoll comprrs.Nr.s was.d lor sovrral    300    jBiMiir«-    troop, travalinj  yaara Thr controtTrsy •«    ,  been heard by the inter state com-    . ^ ^  I merce comml.sslou.    :    reached    Tsunhwa in  ' The report of Uie    Texas    commis-    |    the demilitarized    zone of North  Sion, in effect, held    aa follows;    j    China.  1. Tliat tlie present, so-called, j The reporLs said the troop.« were carload rate, system,    which    partake;    '    “cha.slng a group    of Chlne.se resl-  an any-!    dents who oppose    the Japanese in  The wage scale for the $4,000.000,-    „ot    unlaw-    ¡    ROuehern    Jehol    "  ful    /    !    “A    large    number    of    Japaiic.se alr-  2. Tliat none of the carload rates; Plane.s is a.ssembled at the .Malanyu considered Is .shown to be unrea.son- i    wall    imss, they added, "and  ably high, or w> low as not to be opf    J?*'’*  rea.sonably compensatory.    Peiping and Tientsin.  3. Tliat the various carload minima are not shown to be unlawful  4. That tlie relations or spreads between the rate.s provided for alternative application in connection with the various carload are not shown to be unlawful  5. That the rule.« governing the  LUBBOCK. May 21. (AP)— A. J. (Ham) Holman, former deputy sheriff of Garza county, Hooper Shelton, publisher of the Roby Star-Record, and two Post negroes went on trial in federal court here today on a charge of conspiring to violate liquor taxation laws.  Shelton and the negroes, Lannic Williams and Henry Bates, pleaded guilty, and Hol-i man entered a plea of not guilty to counts alleging conspiracy to transport, possess and sell untaxed liquor.  AAilliam* Trstifics i Williams testified fliat formerly I he worked as a dish washer in a j Post cafe owned by Holman. He I said he had an agreement with Holman under which he kept a “knockdown of 25 cents a pint” on bootleg whl.skey sold in the cafe kitchen. The negro ie.stified that Shelton Begun brought wuikey to the cafe in fruit jars and that it later wa.« emptied into pint bottle.s and .sold for $1 a pint. He .«Rid no revenue stamps api>eai'ed on any uf tlie bottles.  "I was selling lor Mr. Hloman and Mr. Btwiton,“ WUllams >aid Holman formerly .-^-rvcd as deputy under Garza county Sheriff W F. Cato who, with three other Post residents, is scheduled to face trial Thursday for murder in connection with the machine gun slaying of Spencer Stafford, federal narcotics agent, last Febru. »y 7.  Federal District Attorney Clyde O. __    :    E^stus conceded that some counu  TOKYO, May 21--'4*—The pos-i oí IndlctmenLs charging Dr. L. W.  JAP SOLDIERS INVADE CHINA  Military Action Is Against Alleged Bandits  TIENTSIN. China, May 21  •dblllty of JapHne.»ie military action agaln.st alleged bandit activities in northern China was dLsclosed today in di.spatche» to the Rengo minimal (japRne.se New.s agency»  Japane.se military leaders were reiwrted meeting at TlenUin to con-  See RELIKF, Page 9. (of, 7  Little GAINS  THIRD ROUND  Champion Is One Of Four Surviving Americans  u»xembling of le.s.s- than -carload | Klder what measures to adopt in ;  fare of the asserted operations of | several thou.sand Chlne.se Irregu- : lar.s In the demilitarized zone Boutli of the great wall  These report-, followed earlier ad-vlee.s that Japanese iroop.s were moving on the great wall with the intention on entering northern China on an “anti-bandit expedition” The war office e.s.sei ted that there was no intention of orc\ipving Chl-ne.se teiTitorv and that the troop« would be withdrawn to Manrhou-kuo as soon a.s the ba)idlts had been punished and di.s[>ersed "  shttanentR into carloads are not unlawful.  6, That witii rcftiject to the 'iex-bee R.%TES, Page 9, ( o|. 6  Sevier Returns  To The States  49 Die In Crash of World’s I.arqest Airliner  Forty-nine nerxotis. Including arveral »omen and children, perished »hen the Maxim C.orky largest airliner In the world and pride of the wivlet. crashed at Moscow after colliding with a «mailer plane. The mammoth ship, which oimtained a eafe. motion picture cabin and »mall printing plant, here In flight on lU chrUtenIng day. (.Akxorialed Preaa Photo),  Is shown  WASHINOTGN Mh 21 t -RetKirt» of serious floods in the southwest »purr'd proponents of flood control project;, on the Red and Brazofc R ver» to renewed »e. lion today Representative Ravburn ‘P T' -■X», chairman oi the house Inier-.statf commerce commuiec v.t'iit over details of li e proposed $;k; (K'C -000 dam near Denlhon. Texas »¡'h J. 1., lx>rkbrldge of Dallas, con ilt-Ing engineer, hikI hop#-d to file a formal application with the work-relief administration not later than tomorrow.  “We are going to a.sk for the whole amount Ruvbum replied when the suggestion was made that a smaller amount might be nioi e quickly appro.ed  Meanwhile. Albert Stone. Texas state senator was advised the Braz-os river was on one of its worst, rampages and arranged to go to the I pubiu work.v ftdinii.nJration witi; renroseii{i<* i\c- i nv - I anhan’. and .p.hi. 'U lo ; -h' >>e t proccfpirc i:i (nou Will; tnnr prop'», ed  t.iOTXiooon flooil roi,! ..1 program on i that 800-imlc    '  ST. ANNES-ON-1 HE-HEA F.ng May 21 - T In a sliarp form re-venuU. contrasting ye.sierday’f floundering exhibition, William Lawson Little Jr of Ban Franclico. tiie defending champion, gave a spectacular performance tcxjay in eliminating EYic Martin Smith, a former titlehoidei. in the .«erond round of the Bnti.«h amateur golf ehamplon.sliip Little won 4 and 3  The Californian w».' one of four American wlio survived tiie second day of pin* Four other invaders from the United States were sent -to the «ideliiif.’  Be.sldes Ldtie tlie other winnrrs were T. Suifcm 'Tommy» Taller.  Jr . of PipuiK Roc k. L. L, who »hot the last .MX hole; 111 two under par to elimtnal« Andrew Jamie.son. Jr former SrcHti h rlirtmpl'Tn Captain  A Webster-B .’.lock of Monterey  Calif., and R<»ix ;• Hwienev. a former New Yorx». i ow living in London.  The defeaten !<.ifign contenders were John Foi ¡uan of New York;  : Robert W Ki o»ie Jr. of Brof* i line. Mass G . Hayes of Noiih j Andover, Mas.s m.d Robert Stran-1 ahan of Toledo, f>  I r>an R Toppn.K and Richard M I Chapman, of Greenwich, Coiui, and Harvey Shaffer <<r New York, the other member.s •; the American contingent, were not ;whedu!ed to I play today.  NEW YORK, May 21—1' -- Hal Sevier, re«-ently re.signed as American amba.vsador to Chile, returned todav on the Grace liner Santa Lucia to take up permanent residence at Corpus Christi, Tex.  I hked Chile " the re.signed am.  Kitchen. Post veterinarian, and Dr. V. A Hartman, Post physician, with violation of the Harrison antinarcotic act were fauiiy.  At Uie district attorney’.» request, a grand jury wa.s impaneled to con.slder new- indictments against the two men. Federal Judge James C Wll.son directed the dlfimLssal order be drawn in the original suits, but ordered that tlic delendanta be kept under the .same bonds pending action of the grand jury.  Counsel foi Doctors Kitchen and Haruuan yesterday filed a motion asking that the two IndicUiients be qiiHshed.  The deci.sion ot Ea.slus to again pre.sent the cases to a grand jury wa; taken before Judge Wilson acted on the motion  INMI UIFS V \ 1 AI  CHILDREHH Mhv21 M’ —A  bassador said, “but my health ha». Thoma.s, about 25, of Chlldrer.* died never been good since I went there' in a Wichita Falls hospital from Ui-and fliytUy I dec ided that a sick; jurie.s lecctvcd in an automobile ac-man ha.» no right to represent hi.« cldent in which six otlier per.Mins country abroad. I came back about were hurt four months ago and returned wltli the hope that I could keep on. but I found It was lmp<xbslble ”  I’he diplomat wax met at the piei by Mrs. Sevier who arranged for his transfer to the Waldorf-Astoria where he W’tll stay until he leave; for Texa.s.  Oil Bill In  Beaten Senate Test  SNOW IN’ < OI.OHAOO  COI/JHAIK) SPRlNiiS. Colo., May '21    J'- Snow diifu three to  four i<>et (i»-ep choked roads in the Black Foi*‘st in the pialnx region northcn ,t of here. f«»llowmg a spring blizzard in tlmt section  HITLER TALK IS AWAITED  RESUME HUNT FOR 2 FLIERS  WASHINGTON. May 21— ■ . » — Proponents of the Thoma» oil bill lost their first skirmish on the flijor of the .senate Monday. Seua-tors Sheppard and Connally objected wlieu the measure was called up and at i!'»n '»«•« pov,t (xiiied indefl-niieh  The bill would »rewie a federal pftr«J*'i!n lantrd n» li.x quotas of crude oil reaching iiileisiate c*mi-mercf frc»m each «talc and. if the Mate- did not abide by these figure Die buttrd could set quotas for and wells wiliiin them.  May Include Invitation Pact With Russia  For Brooks Field Men Missing Since Sunday  Racing Driver Is Fatally Injured  INDIANAPOI.i;  Johnn.v Hannon ■ was killed at tlie L speedwav icxiav wî  M.  21 - V  !!i-.town Pa 1 „41)011.■ rnotoi pno'tit ing lor  the annual dOO-mhe ract.  'Copvright, 1935, A,« .'«.ated ^re-..^' BERLIN, Mav 31 H* ti li;.fuehr«‘r Hitler today preparr'' the longest sjjeech In hl'i csreet a h .MitteMnmi and Informed circle» .'.nld the r-ra-tion, addreased to Mf reichstag. might Include an InvlUitlon to Russia to conclude a nou-aggresAion pact  The speech, to begin at 8 p m '2 p rn Pjaztern Standard time*, was expected to last two hours It con-sUU of 90 pages and runs lietween 25.000 and 30,000 words Official secrecy was absoutie, but one of Hiller’s rlose.d collaborators, after reading the pre|>ared document. observed:  •You mill find at lca«t Uire»*-quarter.« inu?t b< .juotrd serhatim berau.se it 1» mi f'lii of meat Aftei  ftw HJTLEB. Pan I, C«I I  SHRI-VEItiRT. La Mh 21    4«,  ~ Radi" » quipped planes of the third wit.kt at Bai ksdale field renewed H sfii nil foi I wo missing army fller.s hKlay. Colonel Gerald C Brant .«aid 25 planes were carrying ob.server.« on an lnten.«lve aerial hunt over (»»«rts ot 1 oulsíMisa, Arkansas. OklatKMiia and Texas.  Second lieutenant Wencell O Holla day. pilot. and Private Hicks meciianlc, have b<*en missing since Sunday. Tlielr hi my observaticm pi me wa.« last heard of when they took oft fr<»ni Mmkogee. Okla . for Shreveport en route to their staUmi at Brooks field 'l’exa£  Twentv-ui'c planes returned late vesterdaj ii'<iu an intensive .-eareh (('.rj ft Wide area .-preadiiig t; ■'! ‘Hot Spring- Ark, to Parp Tc^s.. Ibo rcfiort no tract of tht fliers.  ml- Pmr^.y rimtáy 4« i) tonight —IQ Wa4M«-  .,,11«-. -i-M  'in»*'  da V  U^Bt T**«i ‘.Aral ,? iiHjih a.trt^uia -~ rurlty    rloutl. t ’i'ikU! a<‘«t W'«C!t-«daS,  • •rfiicr !n    Wr<iti**ö*y,  Ki*t T*ü«.«    K«.,i    rt«i*S    —  e»nly fkniiij Î.1 -.ti-wh*! ur»tui*<i le-sight anâ Wrdy;    ri!icw«r(    m  iTHitlì (-..-tkii  lUUuvg           Mon    Tua*.      P ®    ä.M.      Tl    se      TZ    Sì      .... Tt    S7      ____ 7S    SS      .... TS -. . . 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