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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: April 24, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - April 24, 1935, Abilene, Texas                                    P A l isi H    y                COLDERU         til)e ^Wient ®ailp 3i^eportc  “WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES”—Byron  VOL. LIV. Full Leased Wires of Associated Press m) United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 24. 1935— FOURTEEN PAGES  (Evenino Edition of The Abilene Morning News) NUMBER 165  Legal Row Halts Trading In Grain  three New Units, 60 Existing (^es To Handle Relief  GASMtAGEKFORElENAtE  Mahatma Snubs ‘Richest Girl*  Despite frequent letter» to hhn expressing an Interest in his pri-los<H»hy, Doris Duke Cromwell (left), called the ‘richest girl in the world," waa denied an audience with Mahatma Gandhi (right). The tobacco heiress ia honeymooning In India. (Associated Tress Photoa.)  ASK ILUNOIS TO OMIT TAX  Revised Small Proposal Subject of Debate  is  Houston Harte  Publisher of the San Anfelo Standard •Times, Tuesday was elected second vice president of the Associated Pre*s at its annual meeting In New York. Mr. Harte, widely known throughout Texas a* a business and civic leader, Is a past-president of the West Texas Chamber of Com--erce.  REPORT RETAIL TRADE REVIVAL DUE TO EASTER   _WASHINGTON,    Apnl 24—(UP)  Franli Wsll'or Neu/ Ynrl’ —Easter shopping brought wide-  rranK na»Ker, wew lOrK,    increases    m    retail    trade    last  To Pass On All Appli- week secretary of commerce Daniel  cations For Projects;  Tugwell Gets Post  WASHINGTON, April J4,_!' Buslnta kUvIUm gentraUy (AP) Pres. Roosevelt toda> as- throughout the country failed to signed a vast scope of work re- show progress.” he added.  lief projects to more than sixty existing government agencies and organised three new government units in addition.  Tugwell HeadN One.  He named Rexford Q Tugwell,  TEXAN BARELY MISSED BEING MAE WEST'S HD3BANIL4lh’24  Glamorous Screen Star, Then Hoofing In Houston, Chyg-ed Her Mind Though; Bud Burmeister Silent  t\r    ^    ' HOUSTON. A^rir,34.-<UP»-Ap-  llrAlHTAICrS ' parenUv R. A. (M» Burmeister.  IFort WorUi pubMy man. thinks *‘NVTV    V    wwv%    somcone done him wrong by drag-  Mk\    III II    I    |i K    Mint his name into the Mae West Is-  wU*    I C/LiLaUIV    ahe-or-isn't-she-maiTjed discussion  _______    which raged today m Hollywood.  -Tin i* T Records at the Harris county  Pioneer Taylor Countian To Clerrs office here show that miss  West obtained a marriage license  AUSTIN, April 24—(UP)—Natural gas waste and natural gas taxes both occupied the attention of the '  Texas senate today.  Sen. Clint Small, Amarillo, detailed to the body, his bill to prevent the billion cubic feet a day wastage in the Texas Panhandle where he resides.  At his request the senate adopted. unanimously, an appeal to the Illlnote legislature not to tax Texas natural gas that Is piped into that state. Five bills were reported to be before the Illinois legislature to tax the natural gas from 6 to 10 ceuU, a thousand cubic feet, after It reaches lUinols.  The resolution reminds the Illi-noLs legislators of “pleasant and valuable commercial relations" between the people of the two states and expresses hope that the rela-tioiis will not be "disturbed."  Some saw in It a covert threat of reprisals if Illinois taxes Texas natural gas.  To stop wastage. Small proposes to assign sweet gas for Illuminating and healing uses and sour gas for carbmi black manufacture.  A house bill proposes stoppage of all planU that strip gasoline from natural gas.  Small’s substitute permits strlp-ping gas from wells that are too  a pipe line to have an out-' IjniteH StotfiS ArmV tO Takfi hoard which will pass on dlstrtbu- 1 midwest, lit ter any other use. His substl-!    .    tlon of the huge fuwd. The presl-i  ♦ te also increases the proportion, |n 31,700 ROOlCieS ' dent himself probably will head this  Most of Texas Due For Rain  Along with the active retail trade,  Roper said that continued gtins DALLAS. Apnl 24- (UP) — The were registered In automobile sales,    wind-eroded    upper    Texas  “In comparison with the corresponding week last year, however." Roper continued, "the surveys are generally encouraging. While the  Fhinhandle. still dry after rams settled dust storms over most of the remainder of the state last week, today had favorable conditiim for rain. Dr. J. L. Cline, government meteorologist, reported.  Dr. Cline said snow wa.s repwted  gains recorded in retail business falling in Denver and the southward were noteworthy, merchants were rusii of the cool weather was ex  undersecretary of agriculture to inclined to express disappointment    bring elwdlness and  that the volume did not reach larg- »howera to most of Texas tonight  and tomorrow. Rain was falling today In Nebraska, another dusty section, he said.  NAB ESCAPING BANK BANDITS  head one of the thrhee new agencies—an organisation for rural resettlement.  He set up also a new unit for grade crossing eliminatici» under the bureau of roads and the department of agriculture and creat-  RECRUITING TO BEGIN JULY 1  Given Fifty Year Only Yesterday  of gas that may be used in produc- i  ing a barrel of mi without classing wawtmotyvn    *nr,i  the well as a gas well.    WASHINGTON.    Apnl    34.~./P»-  Unless some provision is made The army swung today into a drive  for wells so located with on other to virtually double Its actual flght-  outlet is available, some senators ing strength. As the first move in  —"—    the program -which congress has  iM» LEGloLATLRE Page 13, Col. 3 authorized in a bill apprapnatlng  Double Slaying Ends Ball Game  Be Buried Thursday  Funeral service for Mr'-. J, K. Fuller, pioneer Taylor county resident w'ho died this morning at the home of her son. Roy Fuller, county treasurer, will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 30 o'clock at the Central Presbyterian church. The jms-tor. Dr. E. b Surface, is to officiate,  Mrs. Puller contracted influenza in February, and had never recovered. She had been seriously ill for more than a month at the home of her son. 2301 Hardy avenue. Her maiden nhme was Elizabeth Cox, bwn in Alabama on February 9, 1868. She came to Texas with her family. a.s a small girl, settling in Franklin county. She was married to J. K. Fuller on April 10, 1889. The couple moved to Taylor county  HOLLYWOOD, April 24—(API Mae West sighed when told aixnit the report that county clerk's files at Houston, Texas, disclosed a marriaie Ikense issued in 1924 bearing her name and that of K. A. Rurmebter.  "Thai n the ninth man Tm supposed to have married this year." she said. "Will It never end? 1 wa« In a New York show at that Ume, so it mu.vt have been my marryln* double."  COLUMBUS. Miss., April 24— <JP> —A negro baseball game here yesterday ended in a double slaying over a strtke-out.  It all happened when Gus Brook.«v struck out. He became Infuriated over a “ragging" given him by Lin-nle McGee, a woman spectator.  Slveriff Harry West reported that Brooks shot and killed the wwnan and then ran to his home. As the sheriff approached. Brooks shot and killed hlmsmelf.  Norton Minister In Local Hospital  See PIONEER Page 13. Col. 8  2,500,000 Pounds of Mohair Sold  SAN ANGELO. AprU 21 uP) -The mohair Industry arose from its lethargy today after sales of 2,500,-0(X) pounds had been reported yer-terday throughout the goat raising country. The prices were 25 cents for grown hair and 36 to 37 for the kid.  Mark Campbell of M. A. Campbell èc Ccxnpany and Ttmi Richie of A. W. Hllllari & Company were the heaviest purchasers. Campbell secured 600.000 pmind.s from the Schreiner Wool & Mohair company at KenwUle and Richie bought 850,-000 frtxn the Sonora Wool ¿c Mohair comapny at Sonora to furnish most of the bulk of the buying. Uvalde. Rocksprings. Junction, San Angelo, New Braunfels and San Marcos firms sold.  with Burmeister. then a newspaperman, on March 22, 1924  Burmel.ster. however wouldn t discuss the affair.  "I refuse to comment." he said at Fort Worth where he handles publicity for various firms. "I think it very bad taste to bring up such a matter.”  There are those here who remember Mae w'hen she was hoofer and played In vaudeville, and when she and Bud Burmeister ended a torrid w’eek’s romance by taking out a marriage license.  Miss We.st changed her mind.  See MAE WE8T Page 13. f'ol. g  Rev. L B Smith of Winters en- ' lered the West Texas Baptist sanitarium here Wednesday for treatment. Rev. Smith is pa.%tor of the Baptist church at No»-ton.  J. H. liardaway of Monahans had | major surgery. He is an oil com- : pany employe.  FATAIXY TNJl’RED  GALVESTON, April 24    A*. — ;  Robert C. Scruggs, about 66, was fa- i tally injured when struck by a street car here last night, Scruggs, a machinir.t, came here about 10 years ago from Mobile, Ala., wnere relatives survive.  $20,000,000 ft»- the purpose—the war I department announced that the en-' listment of 31,700 men from 18 to 35 will begin July 1.  The announcement came a.s the nation's legislators, told by, a house i leader that war clouds aré "hang-Í ing over Europe," gave attention to two bills to spend I570,000,0(K) on other parts of the country’s fighting machine—the navy and air ba.vfs.  The house planned further de-l^^ae today on the larger of these two bills—the $460 000,000 appropriation for the navy for the next fiscal year. It is the largest regular supply bill for the navy in 15 years. Chairman Cary (D-Ky> had \ said that preparedness for defense was necessary in view of world conditions  The house military committee, meanwhile, went on record with ad-  er proportions. Chicago revealed a continuation of the mall order bus-Ine.ss in good volume.  "Reports of increasing comumer demand for automcRiUes were in line with heavier production figures for the United States and Canada. San ed a third new division to take j pfandjico reported sales of passen-charge of rural electrification. j ggj. ^ars highest In five years. Flf- ‘  The president In dlscvaslng the j representative Texas counties start of the $4.(X)0,000,000 program ^ reported a gain of 62 per cent In made It clear ail applications for j    ^ar sales for the first  projects would clear through Prank ■ quarter.  C. Walker, of New York, who was “improvement in agricultural named    last    night    to hancUe    that    commodity    prices was    reflected    In    a    i  job    as    director    of    the    national j better    business    time    In    a    number    i    tYLER, Aprl 24.—OPi—Two con-  emergency council.    :    oi cities. Parftlcularly encouraglmi vlcted bank ri^ber* who broke Jail  Mr.    Roosevelt    probably    wUl    an-    repiwts    of    this    nature    came    from    Centerville,    Texas, e»rly tsday.  nt?inoa    tomorrow    the    allotment    Florida,•California,    Texas,    and    the'    captured    five miles mtt    of  here shortly before    noon    aftr a  pitched gun fight dirlnf which one of the fugitives was    shot    In the  head.  Mona Bell, who    with    Arthur  Whitten tunneled out of the Cen-terviUe Jail, was shot In the head and shoulder by a shower of shotgun fire from    three officers.    His  condition was    not believed to    be  serious.  Whitten, »sleep on the ground when officers arrived at the spot where the fugitives had concealed their stolen automobile. dl<f not resist capture.  Bell, who with Whitten was yesterday assessed 50 years In the state prison fiw the January robbery of the Buffalo. Texas, bank, opened  Board of Trade Takes Action When Trader,  I Suspended. Gets U. S. Court Injunction  CHICAGO, April 24 (AP)—  Activity in the world’$ largeit grain market was at a itand-itill today while board of trade directors studied a complicated lituation arising from the R«i-enbaum Grain corporation's reorganization action under federal bankruptcy laws.  Opening of trading was postponed by directors just before the starting gong was to have sounded over the pits. The directors later decided to remain closed until tomorrow.  I    InJuncUon    bland.«.  ( Poirf,ponement was ordeivd "until a time to be designated by the di-; rectors pending clarification of legal problems" arising from the ac-1 tlon of the Rosenbaum corpiwation. one of the largest grain houses in ; the nation.  Federal Judge Wm. Hirtly. before whom the grain cixnpany smight reorgantzaticm in a petltiim yesterday, refused to modify an injunc-; tlon restraining the board of trade Terms    suspending    tlwi    Rosenbaum  board.  The new rural re-settlement ag- ; ency is to undertake the sweeping task of moving families and possibly even whole communities to new places of better opportunity, TTiis agency also will take over subsistence homesteading and other related agencies In various departments of the government.  To Retain Post.  Tugwell will retain his poet as undersecretary of agriculture and will be si^ly responsible for this new unit.  The president has not decided whom iMi will place In charge of rural electrification.  Outlining some of his plans at his regular press conference, Mr. Roosevelt showed a list of more than 200 classifications of work  Mention Edison For Housing Job Held By Moffett  bee BELIEF Page 13, Col. 6  See REt RLT1H Page 13. Coi. 2  Negro Cleared In Murder Mystery  FIVE DIE IN CAR CRASHES  Three Automobiles Collide Near Appomatox, Va.  WABHINGTON, April 24.—<A*)— The name of Charles Edison, .son of the Inventor, was among a list of men mentioned today as possible choices to succeed James A. Moffett when the latter retires as federal hou.«ing administrator.    |  Edison was the first housing ad- I mlnistrator for New Jersey.    I  Friends of Moffett said the ad-1 ministrator expects to discuss the i question of hts resignation In an- j other conference with Pre.«ident j Roosevelt before he leaves Sunday j for a trip to the Orient.  His proposed resignation was not definitely accepted In a luncheon Ulk at the White House yesterday. It wi.s understood that President Roosevelt suggested that Instead of resigning he take a leave of absence The belief In Informed circles that Moffett suggested that Stewart McDwiald, assistant administrator.  gM EDISON Page 13. Cot. 3  Soe CONVICTS Page 13. Col. Î  Plaza Building In Dublin Burns  oorpcx’ation from membership privileges.  Mlnneapcrtia and Wlnnlpi« wero the «ily iRher major North American markets open. Wheat prices at Minneapolis drow>»<l »«ore than a cent while Winnipeg quotations also were off about a cent.  Halting trading apparently was mn emergency action to protect the market from any i^ratlims that might arise in the situation. Wheat brtAe three cents Just befwe the cloee yesterday The fUlng of the reorganization petlUim did not become known until after the close.  Seeking to have the injunction dissolved, attorneys for the board met wit haitorneys of the Rosenbaum corporation in Judge Holly's chambers It wa,« mutually agreed that all trades of the grain firm would be closed out as of today and no further trading will be done by the firm until the reorganization Is finally effected  Meanwhile there wa« no actlvir In the grain piU Brokers millet about the floor discussing the situation. Attorneys said It was the  See GRAIN PITS Page II. C4il. S  Greeks Execute  DUBLIN. Irish Free SUte. April 24_i;P)—Fire, rumored to be of tn-cendlarv origin, today destroyed the famous* Plaza building, the "House of Fortune. • but it will not interfere with the derby draw of the Irish hospital sweepstakes.  Joseph McGrath, managing director of the sweepstakes, said the drawing would go on as usual.  s  DEN NGA  iSHftP  APPOMATTOX. Va., April 24 --(A’t—A three-car automobile accident  Two Ex-Generals Call New Venire  in Murder Trial  Two  FATHER WHO ACCUSED CHILD  IN SLEEP WALK KILLING HELD  / ^  Charged With Murder In Death of Wife; Officers Say It Impossible For Boy to Have Fired Shot  The dead W. Dabney Anderson, 46. Vera.  A. L, Mattox 38 Big Island.  Mie.s Bc^bie Mattox 25, Big Island. Miss Salile Rose Chappell, 33. Big Uland.  An unidentified woman, another orrupant of the Mattox automobile Richard T, HeE« of Richmond, driver of one of the cars, was the  only rurvlvor.  Tampico Power  Strike Settled  MEXKX). D. F., April 24 —  TTie three-weeks' strike of Tampico Light and Power Company employes ended today a.s the company heeded President Lazaros Cardenas’ suggestion to accept the strikers’ demands.  In capitulating to lu workers the comoany g .se -ted. however, that It did so only out of deference to the president and without intention of «•GAlDkkhiDg A precedent.  GREENVILLE, April 24—  P. Darden was held in jail here under a murder charge today, awaiUng a call to tell the grand jury of the shooting of his pretty wife whom he had reported was shot by their 8-year-old son Jackie while the boy walked in hi.s sleep.  "I never expected anything like that,” he protested ’.earfully after being informed of the charge on which he was held. “I expected an Inquest to be held, but nothing like this. Can’t I make bond?"  District AUorney Henry Pharr told him no bond could b*. arranged  of Caddo Mills. He burst into tears upon being brought to jail and asked if he had any statement to make.  "It’s the first time I ever was in jail In my life, ' th; 33-year-old man said, "What am I rb'»eged with? They (the arresting officers» told me they wanted to bring me to Greenville for examination."  After his tearful outbreak. Darden told the prosecutor he would be ready to go before the grand Jury.  Jackie also attended his mother’s funeral, but apparently had no in-derstandii^ of what was going on.  The father told officers he waa  until the grand jury inquiry was > awakened early Monday by the  completed, which might not be un- sound of a shot and saw Jackie  TYLER April '‘.--(UP»—A ne gro arrested for questioning in connection with the killing of Mr. and Mrs. W, T German, aged fsrni couple, and the burning of their home seven month« ago, today had baen absolved of suspicion and officers admitted they still were without a sc4uUon of the crime The negro was arrested by internal revenue agents yesterday in a raid on a whiskey still in Rusk county He was released after que.stioning  Boqgess Funeral Held In Dallas  Funeral service for Temple W Abti«n-~sn4 vinmt cimmy. .ho».r. Boggess, 33. of Abilene, who died , »tut e©ol»r tomght, Thuridfty, i-loud> and Monday at Austin, wa.« planned for 1  •I „    tV.*    I    TfxiMi Wei' oi KXWh miridian  2 p. m. today at the home of the l d^udy, ihower* neept III iouthweit piif-Rev. Samuel H Campbell, in Dallas.  Rev. Campbell who was Mr Bog. gess* father-in-law. and the Rev,  Willis P Gerhart erf Abilene were to  H. B. Felder, of Globe. Ariz.. In Local Hospital For Treatment  H R Felder. 23. college student of Globe. Ariz.. h In the We«t Texas  urm u«vi    '     -    Baptist sanitarium here fc«r treat-  '^¡ÌKHila». ; W    °    McAlister,    ex-    ment of senous  rmer commander of the Greek i convict charged with the slaying of an    ^    ^  Percy A. Calkins, Houston salesman  ! killed five person.« near here today, i A'PHENS. April 24 - lPi *»    former    gensrals    convicted    by    courts  martial of participation in the EDINBURG, April 24    A  Venizelist revolt were executed by special \enlre of 35 men was called a firing squad at dawn today. ; t^ay to complete -election of the  former  forces in Asia Minor who emerged  from retirement to engage in the With eight jurors selected, a spe-.«hort-lived rebellion, and Brigadier etal venire of 150 men was exhaust-Onral Kimlsls.    ed    yesterday.  EDY IS GIVEN BUDGET POST  Acting Director Formerly Dallas City Manager  YOUNG CADET PILOT KILLED  Lawrence I. Allen on Train-i ing Flight From Kelly  officiate. Burial wa« to be in Grove Hill cemetery. Dallas Mr. Boggess was « traveling representative for a Chicago publishing house.  I tloB, cooler In wtrt snd north portlone to . Bight: Tharedey, clouhy, cooler in eouth eaet portton. j P.set Te*ee l.*n of lOOth meriillen  • Cloudy, ehowfre m weet and nortii por ,    .    .    .    _    .    ,  Hone, cooler In north weet portton tonight; i John N. Edy Of Texas, tO be asslst-Thureday cU>udy ehowere In iKiftheaet.    director    of    the budget. Daniel  cooler In weet end north porttone  WASHINGTON, AprU 24    -  t President Roosevelt has appointed  T.mp.,.lur.. I    «    acting    dl-  Tuee wod ! fectof and the Edy appointment It « I believed Indicative he will carry on M i in that office.  til tomorrow Darden wax arrested jiist after he had attended his wife & funeral at CUnton oemeteiTg four nules wtnl  .standing otey his mother I»'  the bed on which a moking shotgun  êm MAN CHARGED Page U. CM.1  Forty Five Drown In African Mine  JOHANNESBURG. Union of South Africa. April 24 —    — Forty-five  mineii, were believed to hsve pcr-i.shed todav when a .«udden inrush of water flooded -he lowei level of the new Machavia gold mine near FoteheiMkOQOL  "5h5wers  r»ry ihrrmomtftr  Wrt thtrm'’'n)rtrr  RalsUva kiuaMUty  DALLAS, April 34.—(UP)—John N. Edy, named today In Washing-tot) to be assistant director of the bureau of the budget, lost his post as TMillas city manager weeks ago after a change in local administration,  Edy was born at Klmfawick. Mo He received a grad  ORANGE GROVE. Jim Wells Countv. April 24 - -A’l-The br<ly of Csdet lAiwrence Thomas Allen, a student flier mlssin« from Kelly Field at San Antonio alnce last night, was found In the wreckage of his plane eight miles north of here today.  The plane had crashed In «»ne brush on the side of a hill A Mexican family living nearby heard the crash, which occurred early this , , morning, and notified authorltie« at 1 I Orange Grove. The plane's clock hsd stopped at §;60 When the plane did no* resrh Kingsville. Its first destinaiion of a practlc" flight. 45 Kelly Field  See iDY Page U. CoL t.  •ee PILOT Page IJ. CoL •  tlene Tuesdsv afternoon The automobile in which young FVlder wa.« treveling east with a brother. Charles H Felder, also of Olobf left the highway and overturned when It wa.« struck bv a passing car. also traveling east The accident occurred on highway l-A. SIX mile« from Abilene, at 4 o’clock Occupant.« of .the passing car. whoae names were non learned, brought the injured man and hi*  ! brother to the hospital H B Felder ; has a severe laceration on the nght I side of the head, lacerations of the hight shoulder snd a back Inlurv. ! the attending physic-an said Char-1 leg H Felder received only minor I bruises  1 The broWier* were en route to 1 Arlington to visit their parents, who i live near th#iz Mr and Mrs. Felder I came here last night when notified I of their son’s injuries. They returned to their home today  Toll In Formosa Earthquake 3,185  TOKYO, AprU 24-<P*—The death toll Uy the Formosa earUiqutke was set today in the final official ptUiee report at 3.115. The report said the seriously Injuied numbered • 215. the slightly injured 1.41.5, the number of houses deMrovod 15 293 and lAt number damaged 2S,0()0.   

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