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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: April 18, 1935 - Page 1

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   Abilene Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - April 18, 1935, Abilene, Texas                                 ®{)e Abilene ©ailp 3^tporter  '‘WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES —Byron___  fflutry  vluuv. fall viite .1    0*d    Pr.» (UP) mim. um. wmm. m,L i8.1835- twelve mck    *■»«« .t ti.. «*n. »rtn.»»,.) mosm m  Townsend Pension Plan Defeate  Hitler Charges British Double Crossed  Self-Exlled Politician Found  John GlUc«pic, former millionaire Detroit police commisiJoner, Is shown (left) as he appeared shortly before he vanished into self-e\Ue after a quarrel with Governor Fitzgerald, and (right) as he looked when found at a backwoods ranch. (Associated Press Photos).  SIZ/LINBiT[ Protest Note iEiiNTTO But Not Abandot^  ftf  EP[PDN  Is Sent Japan  WASHINGTON, April 18.—(iiP)—, understood to have been based on The United States today sent a note this government’s oppmltion to the   _to the Japanese government reltcr- setting up ol a monopoly In oil  its protest against the Man- which might be extended to other  Contents Not Divulged, choukuan oU monopoly a» a viola- products in the far east.  tion of existing treaty provisions The United States protest— in and in conflict with the "open door’’ the interest of American oil com-policy in the Far East.    panies doing business in Manchou-  Undersecretary Phillips announc- kuo—was sent to Japan as the cd that Ambassador Grew at Tokyo, sponsor of the new empire of Man-had been Instructed to inform the choukuo which is not recognized by Japanese foreign office that the this country.  United Stales considered the Man- The oil companies contend choukuo monopoly, which became their large mvcstments m Ar^rii in vinlninri trpfitip.. choukuo at  Rebuke Probably Will End Talk of Reich Re-Entering League  BERLIN, April 18. (AP)—A  British embassy spokesman re-  tiFP RTY  ara »sf  Former Administrator Vigorously Defends Law, Admits Mistakes  Passage of Administra tion Security Measure    ^    abandon    a    wouw  J    Ka    KikftnliYcy    VAIir  WASHINGTON, April 18.— Plainspoken as usual. Hugh S. Johnson told the senate finance committee today the mistakes of NRA were due to his administra-  Form Indicated  tliat  Man-  uesci.ucu    Co    equal opportunity ii  though he declined to divulge ^ nations, the note’s exact contents.    The    American reiteration of bev  He said the note, clothed in eral previous protests to Japan i the strongest possible language, was relayed to Sir Eric Phipps, the British ambassador, from Hitler through Bernard W. von under-secre-  House Passes Three  Of Eight Tax Bills  — Buelow, foreign I tary.  :    ‘“*Didn’t    Play    The    Game  , The central argument expressed 1 in the note was said to be that yesterday’s action 'by the League of Nations council positively means the end of any talk of Germany returning to the league.  It is known that Hitler bitterly Designed T O Bring State resents Great Bntam s action In  $17,500.000 Per Year  Adujii Revenue  By House In Present t® 8**^ rid ©r a few rats m the  attic.”  Admit« M»stakes    ,  He freely admitted mli'takes and  uu AQUTNfi'FON    An,*ii    IR    frrof.'^ Ill NRA. but as faults of ad- j  WASHINGTON, April 18.—i    and not of the law. i  (UP)—The house today crush-, Tl\e Blue Eagle was set up. he said ; imperiled by the new    E.    Townsend’s    to stop the trend of concentration i  ■’    ......‘    of InduMrml power which was wlp-1  ing out the small man.  •’No more explosive act of destruction could be commltt4)d than to kill Fh® Vftt-    no    iha.    diffict issue    > It «ow and go bag'k to the utter fu-  The Netherlands and Great Bri-j.    j. . ?    ”    ..    „    »‘»ty of the system we had here be-  j indicated that th© administra-.    1933/*    Johnson testified.  tion’« economic security bill The hard hitting former cavalry  would be passed to the senate ; officer warned tlmt ,r . ^ ts    A    —fft-w.    lacv” to contend tlie old capitalistic  in virtually its present form.    «.otud    not be improved upon.  ITie Townsend $20,000,000.000    that ' if we go back to    that  ¡transaction tax program was offered M a .ub.titute to  administration bill.    i    his was Uie final lestimcmy in the  Eaaders Jubilant.    j    senate’s investigation into the oper-  Defeat of the Towjisend    bloc i    «tlons of NRA. prior to the drafting |  found admlnkstratlon leaders    Jubi- J    of new legislation  See NOTE. Page 11. toi. 7  Qscftyio  OF BA   -.    , . —7~^    .    .    lent-    They    believed    tney    n«a    miiea    of    his    views    on  Iniurv of Six Months Ago President of Senate I s ott the Townsend iMue ror^    ,n<i n. future. to,eiher ,ith  iiijuiy    WIA I IV    ^    .    of    the session Since congress start- ^^^t^jrate charts to bear out hi* con-  Fatal to Brother Of E evaled With Al red  Some Johnson Views Of NRA  WASIIINGTO.N. April 18.— (AP)—8<Mne of Hofh S. John-aon’a NRA view» In brief:  On the whole: "It haa brought a vast balance ot good.”  The IltUe buslne* man: “NRA haa aueceeded In arreahtg tlw destruction of the little fellow In buslneea."  Ijibor: "Haa NRA fuUy Insured the rights intended to he granted to labor? Candor compels me to answer this question •no’,"  Price fix; "Price fixing under NRA is just a Wg bugaboo.** Production control: “If we can’t regulate this economic engine. % x % the next step wfU be abolition of the profit ayatem, and page .Mr. Stalin."  Monopoly: The antl-trusi laws must "accommodate** nee-regulation.  He pre.sented the committee an  District Attorney  and Woodul Away  elaborate charts tentions.  Most of his statement was writ-  ed representative.« have had to work  overtime an.swering thousands of    ______  letters from back home urging them.    «    factual,    dispasatonate    vein,  to support the plan which high ad- j occasionally he lapsed into the (UP)— The ministration officials have termed vemac»ilar. and picturesque lan-cockeyed.”  The Towasend plan.  guage which made him famous as the “crack-down’* head of the Blue   __________ Oecar    Lee Black, member of aj AUSTIN, April 18.  man'circles saying he was led to i pj^^ieer CallaliRii county famUy and geign of Ken Regan, 43, business-j 'Th|T'Towasend plan, modified believe that Great Britain would < brother of J. R Black of Abllme. „jup    «tate seruitor from Pecoa, | gomewhat in the hmi&e. provided for |    Eggi« organisation,  stick to her role of "honest broker .    Jotieph    s ht«>pltal In Phrt «cting govcrntM: of Texas began I payment of $200 a month to ail ov- ;    Heard    By    Crowd   - These    sources said Hitler felt    j-j^ursday    morning at R20 ^ciday.    ;    er 60 with incomes under $2,400 an-i The huge crowd assembled to  AUSTIN, April 18.    (UP)—Tlirce j^tj.Qngly that Great Britain did not    He    succeeded    to    the    governorship    '    puapy.    hear John.snn forced the finance  of eight bills to stop tax dodging, pi«y the game in ranging herself on    gjac^    had been ill since he py virtue of being president pro tern-1 Today’s teller vote came shortly I committee to use the largest a.s-  ' and re-fill a depleted state trea.sury i    gjde of France and Italy follow-    mjured m an automobile-truck pp^g pf tpg «gnate, and by the ab- after the houM began reading the i sembly room In the senate office  West Texas Congress man Will Be Candidate For Reelection  A feoeral district judgeship  were ready today for senate consideration, after final house action.  One, tightening collection of oil production tax, is expected to yield $500,000 a year; the other, changing methods of beer tax collection, will add another $500.000. The third, previously passed by tiie house, flx-for €s motor fuel specifications.  „    ^    «r    (f    t    Art    hw#    Bilki    to    tighten    cigarette    and  West Texaa, when or if created.    mptpr tax collectiorui, to t»ix hard  no attraction for Thos L. Blanton,«^qpprg, «nd to improve collection 17th district congressman. He ex- j pf occupation taxes were left for Decks on the other hand to be a j an afternoon session. Combined, cndldw« ,ov    n»,    *    '''**•  prop».l lor a new U, S. court has •' been put forward in congress by  was passed first.  Rep. George Mahon of Colorado.    it    makes    purchasers of oil and  ing the conve^tmns    collision    near    Albany,    nearly    six    of    Lieut.    Gov.    Walter    Woodul, «gcurity bill for amendment  himself and the British state.smen Sir John Simon, foreign secretary.  months ago. Infection setting up i jp oklalioina and Gov. James V. All-on the left leg resulted in amputa- red In Wa.sliington.  ington office, sent to the Reporter-News, Congressman Blanton said: “Answering nmnm>us inquiries from West Texas, I will nek be a candidate for the new federal Judge-  In a statement from his Wash- subsequent purchaser all' liable lor  the two cents a barrel oil production tax, if the producer has failed to pay it. It is counted upon to add $500.000 a year revenue to the depleted treasuiy.  ^    The bill is almtist identical to one  shlpT should* tiie ¿Vopxised 'new d“ls-;    pa«.sed by the house at a called ws-    ____________ _  trict be created. I am on an im- i    sion of    the 43rd legLslature. That    height of    several hundred feet.  Dortant committee here in congress, one failed to i»ss the senate.    Lieut.    Wilson was a member of  where I can render needed, import- A second attempt to increase the yig first wing, general headquarters, ant and valuable service to the    oU tax    by an amendment to the    73rd pursuit squadron of the U.    S.  country and I want to continue    bill was    made by Rep. Albert Daniel    air corps.    Operations office at Ran-  such w<>rk here if it is agreeable to of Crockett, Speaker Coke Steven-' dolph field, San Antonio, was not  (Signed) Tlio«. L. lEGISLATI KE. Page II, Col. 5 See FLIEU. Page II. Col. 7  tion of that member above the knee «everal weeks ago. He had been In the Fort Woilh hospital for nearly a month, with his wife at the bedside.  J. R, Black, 4’2nd district attorney, his wife, and Oscar Black’s children. Weldon, Bonnie and Norman Lee, went to Port Worth Wednesday afternoon.  Members of the family were accompanying the body to Baird today. Funeral arrar,gement.s were .ncomplete, but it was expected the service would be held Friday, with j  burial in the family Ick at Admiral___    ..  Oscar    Black.    42.    was    born at Ad-, pj,/oeorge E. Bethel, 41,  his plane crashed near a railway de- ^jrai. the son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo, | University  W. Black, early-day settlers at Ad- j school, who died iniral.  Sec GERMANY. Page 11,    7^  ¡rmyfuerIT  FATALLY HURT  Lieut. P. B. Wilson In Plane Crash At Taylor  Rep. John Steven McGroarty. (D,, S«e MECt'RITV, Page U. Col. 4  DAMAGE SUIT GOES TO JURY  TAYLOR. April 18.—fUP>—Lieut. P B, Wilson, of March Field. Riverside, Calif., was killed today when  His admiiUblratton will end till;» afternoon when Lieut. Gov. Wcodul returns to Texas from Oklahoma.  Governor Regan was "inaugural- , ed ’ at a breakfast given by his aen-at© colleaguse. At the executive of- i ficc he signed an act to make it !  Bee REGAN, Page 11. CiH. «  Dr. George Bethel Dies In Galveston  GALVESTON, April 18^(UP)—j ^ Rosabclle Woods, et al, against I^t rites were planned today for    p..»rti#.inn    inc..    in    the  To  Clean U p Docket Afternoon Session  n  Suit for $‘25.000 damages brought  pot here.  He died while an ambulance was carrvliig him to a hospital. The plane was demolished. Witnesses said the motor of his ship had stalled. The plane cra.shed from a  Roesar & Pendleton. of‘T«« miSlci I“™'» O'  Of Texas medical 1    ^    the jury early thi.s after  noon m federal district court here  after  last night  inirni. The father now resides at | several month.#' lUneR».    «uLfMnobile-  Baird. ITic mother died in March, ( jjr Bethel received his    education    Wck^.s    juiy  193.,    I    In    th.    Oarl.ntl. Texa., public Khool.    «>"“'<>•>    Lucder.    o.,    July  Mr. Black at the Ume of his in- and the University of Texas. He ^8. j»iry was agent for the Texas com- , *,erved hi» interne.shlp at    St.    Mary’s    Attorneys    for    the    .  pany at Baird, in as.s(iciaUon with | infirmarv at Galveston,    he    to show    through    Its    witnesses  building -the caucus room.  Revlt'wing the development« tn industry following the war, Johnson said they disclosed "a alow and implacable disintegration of the profit system, and especlallv of unregulated and uncontrolled operation thereof, xx a reliable plan for keening our people employed."  "When the .structure .smashed in 1929.” he added. "It was not a »ledge hammer cracking up a »olid brick. It was the collapse of an empty shell."  With this collapse, and the downward spiral which followed, John son .said, only five types of concerns could survive. He named them a» "the concern with the big war chest and a swollen surplu.s"; "The natural monopoly’’, "the dealers in In  Sm* JOHNSON. Page II. Col. 2  Yoiinn Motorcycle Rider Is Killed  his .son Weldon, who has continued in management oi Uie bu.sine.ss.  my constituents Blanton.”  Congressman Blanton broke into national politics via the bench. He \^was judge of the 42nd district court when he ma dehls first and second races for congress, the latter successful.  Heavy Rain!  Report of heavy rain« ¡»outh of Abilene were received at 2 p. m. today. Fall, according to report, aggregated three inches at Bradbhaw and Ovalo and two tnche* at Tuscola.  LONG PUSHES BILL TO ASSUME CONTROL OVER RELIEF FUNDS  Action Is Likely To Result In Withdrawal of A4I Federal Works Money From Louisiana  was on the staff of the general hospital at Philadelphia.  Dr. Bethel became a.vsoclate professor of aniitomy at the «;hool defendant company, here in 1926 and siiortly atterward«,    introduced  the accident resulted from negligence of the truck driver, George Roberts, named as an agent of the Couiusel of Uie te.stirnony to  J 11U U U L I 1 lege in 1928.  was transferred to Austin as direc-    Uiat Woods and a young wo-  tor of the University of Texa.s man companion were drinking In-health service. He also Iwld the toxicant« on the day of the mi.shap position of professor of thcrapeut- In addition to Mr». Wiiods, plaln-i ics in the school of pharmacy. H*' | tiff* are her children. Roy Glenn, i was made dean of the medical col-  h«» 1RIAI,, PiMte II, t»»l. 4  FT>RT WORTH. April 18.—(UP) - lYank Porter. 18. Azle. Texas, was injured falallv la.st night and a companion slightly injured when the motorcycle they were riding crashed Into a bus near the Lake Worth casino last night.  Torn Heath. 42. Fort Worth, was in a loea Ihospltal with a fratlured arm and .scalp lareration».  Young Porter .5 death was the 27th traffic fatality in Fort Worth this year.  B  [ABINB ENDS  Tremendous Opposition To Federal Oil Control Proposal  WA8HTNOTON, April 18-^/D— The fate of legislation to further control of the gigantic oil InduMiy rested today with the senate mines »ub-commlttee.  It had the responsibility of recommending to the full committee and then to the senate that the Thomas bill be passed, as IndlrccUy suggested by the White House, or permitting it to die without action, the goal of representatives of Texas, Oklahimia, and Callforni» who expressed belief Its enactment into law would induce unconstituticmal invasion of states’ rights.  Contemplating two days of t^l-mony in hearings on the proposal, the various oil Interests wondered how' soon the sub-commltte© would act. Chairman Thomas <D-Utah) indicated last night he would not tolerate delay but added that Senator» Bulow (D-SD) and Fraxler (R-ND) had other cwnmlttee hearings today which would delay a decu>ion at least until tomorrow.  'niomas declined to amplify hi» prevtou.s »tatement that It was safe to a.«isuine the bill would be considered favorably in view of the  Bee GIL BILL, Page 11, €«l. 4  Assessed 75 Year Term In Pen For Slaying Wichita Woman  BATON ROUGE. La.. AprU 18.— (UP>—The Louisiana senate pro-  WICHITA ’ALLS, April 18.—'A’: -Fred L. Johnston today was con-  CLARENCE DARROW WAITS DEATH FEARLESSLY SURE THERE’S NOTHING BEYOND THE GRAVE  Byrns Hopes For .Adiournment Soon  WAL.HINGTON, April 18 tJP)-A rapid-fire schedule of action was; draw’ll up today by hou.se leader« w'ltJi the aim of getting ready for adjournment by June 15 or July t.\ Speaker Bynis conceded, however, that slowncs.s in the senate might delay the end of this session of con-gresi even until August.  "But," he said, "we are beginning to get our things in .such shape now that the blame, If any, for a long session will rest where it should— on the .enate.”  ®    IkX    K.VEV    .MAN    DIE.S  SANTA ANNA. April 18.—J. W. Oinn. 65. native Texan and prominent merchant of near Lockney,  who died in Sealy hospital here late Tije’da wa;. buried in Flovdada today lie had been rc< eiviwg treat-ment for more than a wieek wiien km conditiOD bxamm aenou».  ¡miisTiini  his opponents a 'declaration of war against the United Slates. ’  The house has passed a bill to seize all fedeial relief money sent into th«; state The i»cnatc rofu.»ed . ir\,*!lo accept a re.’^olutlon that would  Moisture Is Reported uni have modified Long: deilamc of  ,    * II o • 1    -    federal authorities by a 23 to 7 vote.  Nearly All Sides  ceeded today to make Senator Huey.    «.sseKsed    a    75    year    prison  P. Ijong a legal czar of state relief 1 and to endorse a program called by  CHICAGO. April    18—<UP) —  Clarence narrow. 78. years old to-  term for the »laying of Mrs. Maude 1 {j«y «pd waiting to die "without fear Hefley, who wa;. killed by liammer  Of Sector  Twenty-two bills comprising  blows here on March 8.  Johnston pleaded mt,anil.y bu' the state vigoroii.sly sought thf deatli penalty Testimony and arguments were completed late yesterday.  The defen.sc contended John.ston was iiifcanc at the time of the slay-  The bill most bitterly opposed by 1 the small anti-Long force provide» 1    »  , By the Associated Press, j Farmers and stockmen of the na-; tlon’8 dust bowl looked hopefully today for a share of the spring ram» which were falling on nearly all | supervise expenditure of all iside.s of the .sector.  ' Light showers and .sprinkles invaded scattered parts of tlie affected are», but the fall was far short of the amount needed to settle the dust and supply moisture with which so start spring crop, and re-  Longs program for the spcial sea- ^    Duane    Meredith    of Wlch-  sion were taken up by the senate j    . »-„.Hiiert th»» he had ex-  finance conn^.^    Jo™    h« -f-  FULTS TAKEN BACK TO PEN  or enthubia.sm.’’ settled himself in an aged rocking chair and talked of life and death.  "I no longer doubt." he said "I know that t'’ere is  death notliiiiR to look forward to in joy or in fe»r.  "T am not the agnostic any more; I am a materialist It U?ok me more than 50 years to nd it out "  _    His    grey head rested against 8  quilted cushion of the hlghback  Left Just Three Months Ago rocker and hi» eyeh were half-rlos-  ' ed Tlie voire that charmed juries  With Pardon In Pocket  declared »ufferers of the disease  DALLAS. April 18—(UPJ-Ralph FulU todayq W'ss taken back to  high percentage of in- 5 Tex»» penitentiary, wdilch he  that the highway advisory board will!  i-eUef cldal mania.  money alioted Louisiana from tlie federal work-rellef fund of $4 880,-000,000. The "declaration of war" statement was made during debate.  Long sponsored the relief bill after a political opponent was nam«d frdrral adiiilniMralor Hr rhaiged  sanity and often developed homl-  Pm© 11. CmL •  êm LONG. Pice II. i  Dr. T. C Lynch, county healjh officer, and Dr. C. W Castner, Wichita Falls htxUi hospital superintendent, testified that in their opinion John.stoii wa* mentally responsible for hi* actions  Mrs Hefley wa . found :r’.rrrl>  ; hcaten in her home here and died i$e hours lAter.  left lesa than three months ago with a conditional pardon in his pocket.  His inglorious surrender to three Denton policemen yesterday ended his es.say at being a bad man on the style of Clyde Barrow and Raymond Hamilton. Hb pardon ha'j been re-‘voked  . Fults as - hU here overnight bv i Bm ILLTf. m* u. fai I  and awed .spectator« in the I/ieb-L.eopold and score.s of evolution trials had lost iU rich timbre.  "All my life T have been seeking some definite proof of God—something I could put my fingers on and say ’thus is fact .’ But my doubts are at rest now. I know that such fact docs not exist.  "When I die-a« I shall wxm -my body "111 decay. My mind will decay and my Intellect will be gone. My soul? The«* is no such thing ” ' He scowled when it was suggested , that perhspr he hsd stepped from I agnoftlici.^m to alheibm i **I don t Ilka UjAt word. U ha»  been *o badly twiated I d rather say I am a materialist ”  Darrow rarely veiiiure« from his bock-crammed apartment on the nothing after sixth floor of a building overlooking the green midway of the Univerelty ’ of Chicago Onrc m a while he lecture or takcü part in a debate on religion.  Often he has to sit in a chair while lecturing and hr- voire, faltering at times, carries to only a few of hi.s h.vtener8.  His new doctrine of materialism I;, a denial that there is more to man thitn matter.  "If you’re honest you can’t believe there is more than that," he said. "There is no evidence under the sun of a supernatural power. The universe is simply a product of evolution, just as man is. and we can't tlilnk about what is beyond Uiat or we’ll get dizzy.  "If you don’t believe me sit down and try to figure out where the end of the sky is. Fix some arbitrary limit. Keep extending it And after vnu r*' »11 Hirou"!! vou'll stiH have ihr riucfatioa. 'llieri whits beyond that'.’  Board Meeting of Red Cross To Be Held Friday  Meeting of the executive board of  the Taylor county Red Cross will be held Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock at Red Cross rooms in the J county courthouse.  I Plans for «ending a representative to the state meeting of Orad-’ uate Nurse.s *s.>»ociatloii of 'Tex»», in I El Paso, May 8 to U, wriil be dl»-cussed. 'The League of Nursing Education and the Public Health ¡Nurses organization meet in conjunction with the Graduate nuraee convention.  Ahii.or »nil    Mo.tly .loirtV ««1»  . I».)«.# («iniKht . Kn«l«y, mosDy clouSy.  VO.l '!’»«*» - w.n uf lomii m#rwiian — Partly « IfHKly. > 'Hiier u>    pwtl®»  lonighi; rftd*y »»rily cl.^ idy.  Kan    f>f    lOWh BW'ftdi*« - ■  M.,ni> cloudy, cooler in we« *nd norlft portion, lonuiht: Knd«y ino»(l> cloudy.  T«mper*iur«»  COOL  . rno >nr I »r  W«1  JUlwuv* Bumldity wiS*   

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