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Kingsport Times Newspaper Archive: June 13, 1955 - Page 1

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Location: Kingsport, Tennessee

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   Kingsport Times (Newspaper) - June 13, 1955, Kingsport, Tennessee                             Deathless Days City County 203 218 Can you recognize accident producing situations? KINGSPORT TIMES Vol. XLI. No. 117 Kingsport, Tenn., Monday, June 13, 1955 10 Five Cents Russia Accepts MOSCOW, June 13 Uf> Russia in notes to the Bij Three Western powers today accepted their proposal for a Big Four summit conference on July 18 in Geneva. GM Workers Nail Guaranteed Wage Use DIM Anamrt In Town Elections Tuesd ay Catholic Group GIANT TANKS OF NORTH DAKOTA GRAIN ELEVATOR 122-feet high tanks, filled TviLh bushels of grain at Fargo. N. D.. snapped at the base and the structures collapsed about midnight Saturday. Part of the grain is shown spilled over a torn railroad spur. Local Civil Defense Takes Part In 'Operation Alert' This Week A 26-hour test alert will begin at IV a.m. Wednesday for Kingsport's Civil Defense workers, as part of else, "Operations Alert, 1955." Purpose of the Kingspori role in President, Officials Move Out Of Capital During Alert Test WASHINGTON, June 13 President Eisenhower goes back to war on a simulated basis Wednes- day to lead top-bracket gov- ernment officials and employes in an unprecedented partial evacua- tion of the national capital. With two hours warning at best, or hydrogen weapons sup- posedly will blast Washington and 48 other selected target cities in the nation, along with six more in Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Canal Zone. Eisenhower, the Cabinet, mili- tary chiefs and other key leaders Trill scramble into cars, planes and buses and head for secret retreats to start running the government on B war crisis basis. Secretary of Defense Wilson will use a heli- copter. Then, for three days, the care- fully picked core, of essential peo- ple from 31 federal departments and agencies will opeiate Irom secret relocation sites spread out us far as 300 miles northwest, west and southwest of Washington. They will 'handle some of the normal routine of government. But mainly they will take on the burden of! solving-the vast'maze of-problems that would descend on them the first 30 days of a nuclear war. Some of the evacuated worker? -will live in hotels, motels the second National CD Test Exer-j the exercise will be to increase public awareness of the supporting roles of 'cities, states and regions when no attack is made on such areas. It is expected that Kingsport. one of the mutual aid cities, will be asked to test its program for handl- ing refugees from a hypothetical atomic attack upon another area. Other mutual aid area cities are Knoxville, Chattanooga, Nashville and Memphis. Knoxville-Oak Ridge is one of the five critical target areas in the Southeastern region and an "at- tack" there Wednesday would place Kingsport in emergency relief status for handling refugees and communications. Fifty critical target cities of con- tinental United States will receive surprise attacks with additional at- tacks on Alaska, Puerto Rico. Ha- waii and -Panama. At the nation's capital more than '90 federal de- partments will evacuate along with President Eisenhower and White House personnel. In Kingsport the test alert will sound at II a.m.. Wednesday from two sirens, one located on the roof of Homeland Furniture Store and one at Fire Station No. 2 on Memo- rial Blvd. There will also be a mo- bile unit in another area. A third siren, to be installed at Westview school, won't arrive in lime for this test alert. At Civic Auditorium the commu- nications system will be in opera- lion for Ihe full 26 hours, until 1 p.m. Thursday, as will other oper- ating groups of the Kingsport unit. Two men were bound to grand' The city will be prepared to re- jury Monday in Sessions Court on' charges of drunken driving and Cockfight Raided Near No Arrests Are Made CHATTANOOGA, June 13 County officers raided a cockfight arena near Soddy yesterday, but no arrests were made as about 50 men and women scattered after warning by Chief Deputy unidentified man. H. R. Grant said Weber City's Mayor, Council To Be Elected Town elections are on the'agen- da of tomorrow's business at Web- er City, Gate City, Clinchport, Dun- gannon in Scott County, Va., and at Appalachia, Big Stone Gap. St. Paul, Pound and Wise in Wise County. Weber City is to hold its first election since it was iiicorporamd last year. Polls will be open in the south- west' Virginia towns from a in. to p.m. Candidates for all the seats va- cant on the councils of St. Paul and Clinchport will have to be writ- ten in, as the ballots fail to present enough names for all the offices. BUENOS AIRES Supporters of President Peron, shouting "Down with the clashed last night with Catholics chanting "Long live Christ the king." At least eight persons were in- jured by flying stones, a dozen others roughed up .and some 250 3-Year Contract _ follows Terms Of Government jWon Af Ford Property Cited for St. Paul has two candidates mayor and five candidates for six eat on the council. Clinchport has candidates" for mayor and two for five council seats. Clinchport Town Sergeant H. Darnell has announced he is withdrawing from that race and is a Democratic candidate for Scott County sheriff. He is the only Dem- ocratic party candidate for a coun- ty office. His announcement leaves town sergeant's office with only one candidate, Harley Vaughn. The subject of mail ballots has come up in the town elections al- ready. K. W. Meade of Pound terciay declared his town has'cot held a legal election since it was incorporated in 1946. lleade quoted the town registrar as. estimating. 40 mail ballot ap- plications have been_received. He said this makes 13.3 per cent of the entire vote of approximately 300 voters. Mea'de said the ace windows with stones and burned a priest's car before police rushed into the city's central square and scattered the mob with tear gas and chemical foam. j Later the pro-Catholics re-j grouped and started to march back' to the cathedral, but they dispersed by police and firemen.; After order had been restored, newsmen entered the Episcopal Palace, where more than persons had taken refuge. The interior of the cathedral it- self was strewn with benches, tables and desks which had been pushed -against the doors as bar- riers. Later authorities ordered the jailing of some 250 of ihe refugee Catholics. They were picked up in police cars and hauled off to central police headquarters. turmoil raised tension to its highest pitch since the church-state dispute broke out seven .months the registrar -has failed to comply with ihe law in properly listing the qualified vot- ers of the town, and said legal ac- tion has been started to force a legal election in Pound. He said there are people who vote by mail there who have never lived in the town. It is reported to be customary at Appalachia for 25 percent of "the voters to vote by mail ballot. The registrar reported 137 applicant for mail ballots 600 voters. Candidates for offices in the towns are: Gate City: E. B. Elliott, incum- bent: Mack Wallace and Gerald Summers; for council, five to be elected: Ford Hubble, Hugh Shanks. James Cassell, H. S. Ber- ry, Cossie Gillenwater, E. J. Robi- neite, R. p. Chapman, w. H Shorn, E. R. Coley, C. T. Meade and JB. D. Helms. City: For mayor: Eugene out of less than By GLENN KNGLE DETROIT. June 13 CIO United Auto Workers today nailed down at General Motors Corp. the same Guaranteed wage plan it won By STKRL1NG F. GREEN w'eek fr0m Ford' WASHINGTON, June 13 Hoover Commission today urged: Walter Reuther. UAW president, iCongress and the President to crack down on what it called misma'n-, firmly established the con- arrested. The noting plunged anij wasteful use of the government's vast real estate hold- i troversial employer-paid suppie- gentina into us menial unemployment benefit sys- crisis in two years. rn of a series of reports, the commission said in the auto industry, an im- Peron supporters surged against j government owns 472 million acres of land -one fourth ol the nation's iportam beachhead from v.hich he controls federal-hopes to launch it imo other in- structures with space 1.250 times jdustries. jlhat of New York City's Empire! The three-year agreement was State Building. hammered out in a predawn settle- Yet the government has no up- ment alter more than 37 hours of to-date inventory of its holdings1 bargaining broken only by brief and exhibits little familiarity with! recesses. a group of Catholics guarding the steps of Buenos Aires' huge -Metro- politan Cathedral. Shots rang out but apparently no one was hit by bullets as the mob advanced on the adjoining archbishop's palace. The demonstrators smashed pal- Three Local Men Glass Company Vice Presidents "modern real property manage-; More than 40 o( GM's 119 plants ment" in their use, the commission across the nation --were hit by sa jwalkouts as the negotiations As a result, agencies frequently i dragged on hours after the union's buy new property when they could occupy ground or buildings already owned by the government, 'said the 12-member commission headed by Blue Ridge Glass Corporation to- former President Herbert Hoover. day announced the.appointment of! The report asked President Ei- the recent Ford Motor Co. contract midnight strike deadline. The strikers were expected to return to their jobs quickly with little loss in-auto production. The GM pact closely followed three local men as vice presidents and the re-appointment of H. L. Ross as assistant secretary and senhower to make a larger nearly every respect. It calls of authority to the General Serv- ices Administration, and to force controller. compliance with orders of that The new vice presidents are S.; government w I d e housekeeping Benedict. T. W. Glynn. and J., agency, which it said are now IE. Rigby. Their positions wi go -that church elements were plotting to undermine his regime. Church officials have denied the charge. Congress was called into urgent company are, respectively, director vacations and holidays similar to those worked out at Ford. In addition; it grants the UAW a agency, which it said are now j full union shop for the first time 'he; sometimes ignored by the 27 prop-, meaning that GM's relatively few erty-holriing agencies. j nonunion production workers must for improvements in pay, pensions. of industrial and public relations, i The commission also asked Con-i director of mechanical and product gress to strengthen the Bureau now join the union to keep their the Budget as a agency. The commission development, and chief engineer. All three were commended by the Blue Ridge board of directors for their valuable services in the development of the company. Mr Rigbv has been with the company since 1927, Mr. Benedict and Mr. j political fireworks." of! jobs. coordinating, An additional GM emplov. es represented by the CIO Inter- sidestepped i national Union of Electrical Work- some property management issues. crs were iven the econom- which, when raised by the original ic under an alfreem0ent commission stx years ago. set off !reached an hour after D Glynn since 1923. Mr. Benedict special' session today. years' "e's expected Club past president, former leaders were settlement was announced The Former v'ce mavor of Kmesnm-r recommended j electrical workers had threatened Dormer v.ce majoi of Kuigspoi that a single agency be given sole to join Ule workcrs in s a city council- responsibility for the of forest lands and grazing lands. I to lash out at the church and voice support for their leader in the Senate, where the Peronistas hold all the seats, and chamber, 'they the lower control all president of the Sullivan County TB Association and has served as a deacon of the First Presbyterian Church. but. a dozen 'of. .the 155 places. P.eron himself scheduled a then as now divided between the Interior Department's Bureau of Land Management and Agriculture contract" costing Department's Forest Service. 'he GOO million dollars Today's report recommended Mr. Glynii is a member of thej'omy that .Eisenhower create American American tionwide broadcast tonight to "speak 'to the people." The- women's Peronisla summoned its members to a meet- ing today to voice support for gov- ernment charges that procession of .thousands of Catholics attempted Saturday to destroy the plaque on the front of the capital commemo- rating the president's late wife Eva Peron. The running dispute came to a> w head Saturday night when church Ceramic Society, the committee to study the federal Society of Civil Engi- rural ,ands and "make recommen- followers held a Corpus Christ! j parade in Buenos Aires streets neers. a member of the board directors of Ridgeficlds Country Club, member of the Rotarv Club, pany member of St. Paul's Church and former .vestryman ol the church. Also a member of the American Ceramic Society. Mr. Rigby is a former vice chairman of the Amer- ican Society of Mechanical Engi- neers. He has been on the Salvation I Army board of directors and is nn of the First Presbyterian Church. dations for their improved man- agement." and that a uniform policy then be developed for all Episcopal i agencies involved. 78 Race Victims In Mass Funeral Reuther called the GM settle- ment ''an extremely significant over the three-year period. Reuth- er said it was worth better than 20 cents an hour per the Ford contract. GM President officers seized four dead fighting cocks, a tub of iced beer, some corn, liquor and a pair of scales used to weigh the contestants in the illegal sport. 2 Men Bound Over On Whisky Charges ui whisky. Jr. set G. ceive refugees from a disaster area and carry out emergency re- hef action. Kitchens, schools and Judge S. the bond of'hospitals will be refugees 1 assigned, fed and treated as they nd Both were arrested by Deputy! evacuate the stricken target area. conjunction with Kingsport's Weather Report jjgssi'-rmasi'ii'S'.'.rffi.s; in the low 10s, d.i- ciionce ol afirrnoon scattered showers. TEMPERATURES The 'other man. about 45. pleaded and groups who recently completed guilty to drunken driving but inno- the. Bureau of Mines First Aid cent "to possessing whisky. training course, to see this movie. 1) a. m. Koon 1 p.- m. a P. m. 3 -p. in. H p. m. i p. m. 6 p. m. P- m. fl p. m. 65 63 64 63 61 59 Mlon.gtu 1 m. 5 a. m. B m. 7 n. m. 8 a. m. 9 R. m. 10 m. P. 10 p. m. 5R n m- 11 p.1 m. 5fl Precipitation I tut 24 .lourfi. trace, rreclpltatlon thts moni'i, 1.13. Precipitation this vear, 23.57. TODAY'S SKIES Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Tuesday New Moon a.m p.m. n.m. .Sunday night Thc Ilrsl ecUpsc of of the Sim, rill occur at thts New Mbon. There will be iwo more this S'tar, one of the Moon In November and another of the Sim In December. None-of; them-will- be vUlble here. mil llmra Ea.ilorn Blanriardi Computed for Klnjsport Publishing Co., KlrtKfpnri. Tenn.. by Bailey II. Frank. QUfClice, Vermont. New Mmtary Buying Probe Being Planned WASHINGTON staff Investigators went ahead with (he spadework for new probes of gov- ernment procurement today as Sen. McClellan (D-Ark) called for proseculion of "Ihe nest of- graft- ers'.' he said already has' been found. The Senate investigations sub- committee which McClellan heads completed four weeks of public hearings Saturday into .military procurement activities centered around Harry. Lev, a Chicago hat- maker who obtained lucrative gov- ernment contracts. Lev swore he "definitely never" bribed anyone with as much as "one broken al- though hearsay testimony had ac- cused him of paying to Air Force Capt. Raymond' Wool. Ke told of giving some Rifts, but no money, to other .procurement per- sonnel. A business competitor. Leon M. Levy, of New York, had told 'of and said he himself had -paid out some money for gifts through a business associate. McClellan, referring to this and other testimony, said. "If we find such.conditions in one place, it is our clear duty to investigate whether any other agency of the military Is contaminated." Staff Investigators already arc- working on other areas of procure- McClellan said. ed: Roy -'O. Tiller, Barney C. Meade, Paul Godsey, J. L. Culbert- bon, Ralph V. McConnell, J. D. Ford, C. T. Jennings, Joseph H. Ely. Frank M. Parker Jr., Hubert McDavid and Tom Whitley. Clinchport: For mayor: T. E. Mullins, incumbent; Charlie I. Stacy: for council, five to be elect- ed; Ray Stone and Herman E. Vest. For town recorder, Venus Vaugn: for town sergeant, Harley Vaughn. For mayor: C. Xl.ichurrh Plenary, incumbent. Frankie despite. a government ban. The clergy incited burn the Argentine flag, stone newspaper offices and public build- ings and attack several foreign embassies. Saturday's incident and last night's demonstration confronted Argentina with its most serious situation since labor unrest ignited a series 'of strikes and disorders in April 1953. That crisis reached its climax in the killing of five central plaza while. Peron was addressing a rally. Commenting on the weekend violence. pro-Peron newspapers Mr. Ross, who was re-elected as. assistant secretary and controller.' LE MOMS, France is a past president ol the East Ten-! funeral wilt jnessee Chapter of the National Of-'600-year-old fice Management Association, and: morrow the Machine Accounting Society jthe worst disaster in the history He is currently secretary, and al'to racing. H< coming vice president of Rotary.1 Thc toll rose He belongs to Broad Street of one oi odist Church, and has been a when ber of the board of stewards. Thief Takes At Doctors'Building today with the persons injured French driver Pierre Levegh's big silver Mer- cedes-Benz hit anothe ing the annual 24-ho I race, caromed across the Harlow H. Curtice said it assured the vast GM auio empire of three more years of labor peace. Curtice, however, was less than enthusiastic about the guaranteed wage plan won by the union. He intimated that GM agreed to it only because Ford had first given in. Curtice said the guaranteed wage plan was "exceedingly com- plicated and will require some time to fully appraise." but GM nevertheless had accepted it. GM like Ford agreed to sruar- laid-off workers 60 to 65 per mass.cem of regular take-home pay in- eluding state unemployment com- benefits, for a maximum of 26 weeks. GM will contribute 5 cents an hour per worker to- ward a 150-million-dollar trust to finance the plan over the next three years. Curtice said that GM. while the guaranteed wage ur sports carlplan' stl" "earnestly" believes the responsibility for deter- be held in Le Mans' 3ld Gothic cathedral to for 78 persons killed l, track! nnd plowed flaming into the crowd j lne amount and duration of acked 20 deep against the barrier. unemployment benefits "rests with Hospital officials said five or six ;tne legislatures of the various I of the injured were still "in jpcrate condition." j One American was among thej A dollar-minded thief robbed the 'injured spectators. He was Rov bannered such headlines as "Trea-iDoclors1 Building. 120 W. Ravine. 'Hunton. a U.S. soldier stationed at son nnd Insult Must Be of about S135 The government ordered a ban] break-in Saturday on all outdoor religious ceremonies change scattered throughout the doctor reported to police. currency in Army hospital in Orleans, night but left! Most of the dead including desk, and 2 children were Ilicveri to have been French, iLocal Man Sought Assault Warrant Local law enforcement said Monday morning they were for a 20-year-old dress; and processions country. City Detective J. M. Broyles said though several bodies still had not In recent months the Peron gov-ient''-v was gained by forcing 'a' rbarj been identified.1 Levegh also was ernment has pushed through lcgis-id001' He said he was toldjimong those killed. lation authorizing divorce. droppe'dilhe intruders broke: Despite (he tragedy, .ihe traditional tax exempt inn-; nn I several cash boxes left road race lor sports "'im escaped police properties and finiiiHalisirlc de5iks and soft-drink i was carried to its conclusion. wilhj cr n :o nlile. Per nour ----------sunport fo? Catholic -school; I Hawthorn and codriver Ivor cal'-v Saturday morning. for council, five to be also tional convention, to take awa ed: Glenn T. Osborne, Agnes Ha- gan, Sidney Rudder, J. W. N'ic A. C. Elliott, Wade H. Beverly B. Smith. Appalachia: Elects three mem- bers to a five-man council wnich names' the 'mayor: W. R. Young, incumbent mayor; Tip Lawson, in- cumbent Stewart A Stidham, Muncie M. Jenkins, Ern- est J. Skinner. Mary Ruth Dave Isaac and W. S. Clark. Big Stone Gap: For mayor: ,7. E. Body. Charles E. Strong and Craw- ford Boston (since for council, six seats, Charles D. Rog- ers, Earl S. Kelly. J. P. Wolfe Jr., The Medical Arts Building Btieb of Britain winning in a. The man's wife has out an dc was apparently broken into i three-liter Jaguar at a record-13551111" aml battery warrant and a the church's constitminnai Ihc Iimc bllt so fav "oth-'breaking average speed of warrant against him. A me emu on s constitutional position I bccn rcfaneet mlsslng. ,hc miles per hour. 'warrant, sworn out Saturday chars- 'dctective said. Officials said halting the him with assault and batterv .would have cluttered roads Kingsport girl "longest, Infectious Sleep ln tnp 'rack with the quarter la rape, will be withdrawn tne dispute j r ;of a million spectators at a Sessions Court Judge S. Isainu Kano, 30. ar-'Whcn ambulances and rescue Gilbreath Jr. said Monday morn- as the state religion. In the past two days the Catho-! began. News photographers were TOKYO rested with able to send their pictures of the! shomder .._ .tils wf-pironri weekend The only company with radiophoto fa-iso peacefully cilities, refused to transmit I flnisliec incumbents; .0. S. Barker, O. P Orr, George A. Cline, C. G. Rnbi nette; W. R. Stone, J. C. Tucker, Jack Weiss, Albert H. Sa (Bo) Phillips; w. C. E Paul B. Quillcn, B. S. G Clifford Smith, Robert J. Roland W. Rose. John B. GillyV name is on the ballot, but lie has died. 1'ound: For mayor, Patrick Rob- erson, incumbent; Winton Boiling; Clarence Wright, K. W. Meade and Archie Short. For council, four to be elected, V. F. Jackson, Harry C. Roberts, K. O. Roberson, Ber- nard' V. BoRgs, D. R. Lawson. 'SI. Paul: For mayor. Holland K. Fletcher, incumbent: C. E. cell. For council, six to be elected: Walter Jessee, David E. Stanton, S. .W. Johnson, 0. Neil Hall arid J. R. Jones Jr. Wise: For council, five to be bag of loot over-crs already were having trouble ing. today, explained the site. Tne man allegedly threatened ;o lustrations to About ol the his wife and took her in his car and other world centers. ..You wouldn't have caught me remained quietly throughout beat her after she got off work .its at the closed road circuitjat a drive-in here at about in that house that.'south of Le Mans for the coiitinu-ia.m. Saturday. ----.......jlied my burglary work.-ation of the race. Two Roman' An officer said police, who pictures. Instead they sent took a little nan too. I didn'UCatholic priests conducted an earlyjbeen warned of the threat, started the Communications Ministry, jwake up until it was bright day." -morning mass in the infield pursuit, of the car. The man prayers for it near his home. '____________I ing a loaded .22 automatic rifle and ja bayonet m the car. an officeT The warrant which Judge Gil- {breath says will be dropped was sworn out after he allegedly took 'the teenage girl in his auto alter ;.she got out of a movie and tcmpted intimacies. which was closed over the-week-i what did Kano do first thing- initerday, including end. jail? Fall asleep. Idead. HI House Prepares For Real Fight Over Dixon-Yates Power Issue elected and to select the mayor: WASHINGTON. June Pulton, Tenn.. long sought House is preparing for its first ;TVA. real knockdown fight over the Dixon-Yates power issue this week, with leaders on each side'predict- by lions of dollars." Rep W. Sterling ing victory. The question. Cole (R-NY) Thc purpose is to kill the called the Fulton project "un- bitcked by President socialism" and said "I to lill growing TVA needs with'don't believe Congress is ready to; Nine-Year-Old Boy is Sn Old Quarry up for j power from at West Wednesday and'Thursday, is likely; would 107-million-dolIar up socialism." Cole is a se-j Memphis, Ark. It: mLMiiuer of the Senate-House! be built by the Middle; Atomic Energy C o m m 111 e e. to be decided by a narrow The House Appropriations Com- mltte voted lust week to reject a request' for million dollars re- quested for a transmission line to iSouih UtililieH Inc.; headed by KA- Dixon-Yates contract was JOHNSON CITY. Tenn., i.fl A nine-year-old bov was drowned shovtly ,lftel. 11001; Sundav when hc A. Dixon, and the Sowiicrn. collated by the Atomic Energy slipped from the rocky ledge of an Co., headed .by Eugene Yules Rep. Cannon chairman. Commission a.s a means of repine- ing some TVA power used by AEC abandoned quarry near Happy Val- ley School H.-, two 13-year-old play- mates looked helplessly on. Dlxon-Yates power into the j predicted that plants. j Drowned was Pat Hyder, son ot Cannon said the "widest latitude i Mr. Mrs. Olenn Hyder. "with bipartisan for debate" will be allowed under I Carter County Deputy Sheriff ol the appropriations committee. C. C. Wharton, Dewey I. Wheat Icy, Taylor Bcntley, Mrs. Huttie G. Bates, Virgil R. Crnft, James J. Collins, .Mlrl Salycr.E D. Vic- ars Jr., W. A. Thompson, R. fc. I marked the money to start work; ment." bcraii.ip he said they would'will be open to voting the Tennessee Valley Authority the House will approve i rules setting aside all of lorn. Instead, the committee nar-'botli proposals "without for arguments. The measure Charles Stevens. on a new TVA stcnm plant, ntisiivc the government "many mil-i day, next.body about 'accident, Harrison Dclonch and Constable recovered the 45 minutes after the   

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