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Kingsport Times Newspaper Archive: September 10, 1935 - Page 1

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   Kingsport Times (Newspaper) - September 10, 1935, Kingsport, Tennessee                                KINGSPORT-THE CITY OF INDUSTRY VOL. 217 MEMBER A. B. C. KINGSPORT. TENNESSEE. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1935 EIGHT PAGES TODAY FULL LEASED WIRE ASSOCIATED PRESS PRICE THREE CENTS VICTIM NAVAL MOVEMENTS ARE CENTER OF INTEREST AS SUEZ CANAL IS GUARDED BUS IN WHICH 35 CHILDREN NARROWLY ESCAPED DEATH Ethiopia Vitally Con- cerned in Both Brit- ish, Italian Plans at Mouth of Suez TROOPS ADVANCE QUOTATIONS FROM HUEY'S SPEECHES By the Associated Press Many of the Phrases Are Well Known to Those Who Followed His Career 'SLAP DAMN TO HELL' WASHINGTON, Sept. British and Italian naval forces I Here are some quotations from In the Mediterranean, Emperor tne speeches of Senator Huey P. Haile Selassie of Ethiopia took Lomj: steps to prevent the establishment j "j rather see my laws of a detachment of Italian sold- j (share-our-wealth) passed than be lers in his capital. j president. Passage of the laws is The Emperor denied a request by the only way they can keep me the Italian legation for permission i frOm being president if I want to to bring in a legation guard sim- i be unless I die." ilar to that which the British have j entrenched around their mission. "None will be too rich, none too At the same time, .provincial Gov- big. too small, but at the end I ernors warned foreigners to leave and at the most every man a the Interior of Ethiopia for the comparative safety of Addis Ababa. Several foreigners left the capital j and started for the seacoast. king." and started lor the seacoast. X Rapid naval movements in the Mediterranean occupied the center of interest in the Italo-Ethiopian Situation today. f Although Ethiopia has neither seaboard nor it was vitally concerned in both British and It- alian ship movements. Great Britain, to maintain her "I'd prefer to be the first citizen of Louisiana rather than the sec- ond citizen of the United States, i I wouldn't have had any trouble swapping into the vice-presidency the last tine." EFFORTS TO SAVE LIFE OF SENATOR FAIL; STATE SHOCKED BY HIS DEATH Repeated Blood Transfusions Help, But Hemorrhages Continue to Sap Strength Early Today FAMILY AT BEDSIDE AT DEATH BATON ROUGE, La., Sept. Huey Long, the farm youth who wanted to make "every man'a king" and gained unprecedented power in Louisiana, died today, the victim of an He was 42 years old. The self-styled political "dictator" of Lou- isiana and possible presidential candidate next year, died at a. m. central standard time. His family and close litical associates were at his bedside. I Kis death left his powerful ma- "When you go into a booth and Kingsport Times Staff Photo j More than a score of students, ranging from 11 years of age to 1 6, were injured when this school bus was struck by a Southern Rail-: way engine at a switching point at Daniel Boonc Yard, five miles west of Gate City yesterday morning. Thirty-five students were aboard.! Only a "miracle witnesses said, prevented the accident from becomin g a tragedy. An investigation was being conducted today m an effort to place the responsibility for the crash. Emmctt Taylor, veteran sch ool bus operator, was driving the bus. The rear end of the bus POLITICAL MACHINE WITHOUT A RUDDER ask for a ballot for either Roose- i ed by the engine is pictured. life line to the 'orient, rushed two j keeper of hell." aircraft carriers to Alexandria and hurried the strategic massing of veil or Hoover, you're just asking j for an introduction to the gate- warships in the vicinity of the Suez canal. Should Britain close the Suez canal, Italy's principal lane for transport of troops and munl- You can have the N. R. A. and P. W. A. and C. W. A. and U. U G and G I. N. and any other kind of dad gummed lettered code. can wait until doom's day and see tions to East Africa would be clos- j 25 more alphabets, but that is not ljeut Governor cd I (Continued on page eight) j s L.ieuc. governor CHANDLER VICTORY Investigation Launched IS ASSURED TODAY Into Bus-Tram Accident EFFECT OF LONG'S DEATH IS STUDIED smash- j Politically Louisiana Is In a Whirlpool Today; It Has No Directing Hand THE 'KING' IS DEAD EMERGENCY GROUP SHOWS OPTIMISM ed. Also Maneuvers Italian men-of-war were also i maneuvering in Mediterranean waters between Sicily and Africa. At the same time Premier Mus- solini planned to test his nation's military preparedness with a one- day nationwide mobilization which would involve Fascist par- ty members, 650.000 youths of from 18 to 21, and boys. The patient search for a solu- tion to the Italo-Ethiopian im- solution which would rec- oncile Italian plans with League of Nations continued even though II Duce had not given assurances hostilities would not be begun until the League's special committee had finished i's Ethi- opian inquiry. How Far? Premier Pierre Laval of ranee wanted to know from Prime Minis- ter Baldwin of Great Britain how far Britain is prepared to go if I month at Norris. Tenn. Leads Gubernatorial Pri- mary Over Thomas Rhea j Authorities Seek to Fix Blame For Accident at Daniel Boone, Va., When 35 Children Narrowly Escaped Death in Bus Political Analysts Effect of Huey's Death on State Political Group By RALPH VVHEATLEY Chief New Orleans A. P. Bureau seat of the Long I NEW ORLEANS, Sept. r overnment. Ponder death of Senator Huey P. Friends and en- I Long at the hands of an assassin emies alike chine, which controls practically every office in the state, without a directing head. There is na "Kingfish" to take his place. While his lead- ers held confer- ences to decide what steps to take, the sena- tor's death gave courage to his opponents, whose split into sever- al factions had aided Long's as- cent to power. There was sad- ness here, the LEADS BY LOUISVILLE, Ky.. Sept. 10 Tennessee Economically ____ ___ On Upward Trend NEC Is j (Happy) Chandler entered the sec- Told During Meeting J RELIEF WILL END Italy breaks with the League and if the terms of the covenant are fully applied. Italy's renewal of friendship with two countries have been cool since Chancellor Dollfuss was assissin-. ated in an abortive Nazi Putsch last result, it was be- lieved in German support of Italy's CHATTANOOGA, Sept. 10 With their heads full of figures tending to show that Tennessee economically is on the upward trend, state heads of federal agen- cies turned away from a national emergency council conference to- day, planning to meet again next The next meeting place was an- nounced by Hugh Humphreys, state NEC director who called the gath- ering here. Originally this was slated to be a two-day meeting, but work was completed in yesterday's sessions. Number Decreases Barton Brown of Nashville, ond day's count of the vote cast in Saturday's Democratic gubernator- ial primary with a lead of over Thomas S. Rhea. His supporters predicted that the 3nal tabulation expected late today would give him a record-breaking majority for a Democratic state- A thorough investigation into the near tragedy at Daniel Boonc Yard was being made today in an effort to determine the cause of the school bus-train crash in which more than a score of the 35 students aboard the bus injured. Although Scott county school board officials said that no warrants have been issued and that no prosecution is yet under way, it is known that an attempt is being made to fix the blame for the wreck which wide primary over Rhea, who had narrowly averted bringing disaster to this section. A complete report a plurality of in the first pri- is expected to be made tomorrow. mary. While Are Jubilant j Sheriff O. B. Darnell, who made Chandler headquarters an investigation immediately fol- expansons pan in-return for j TERA chief, told the council that Italian sympathy with Germany's the number of families on relief rolnnial ambitions I rolls havc becn reduced from a C Emperor Selassie of Ethi- peak of to reported on ed mire troops and munitions to he lief, he said, but he could not fore tell the final disposition to be made the Northern frontier when ne al- learned of new movements by It- h Bubsidiarv- tne transient ahan troops in that area. system, wiil be discontinued were jubilant over the prospect lowing the accident yesterday mor- that the youthful lieutenant gover- ninSi did not commit himself on nor had gaine4 the decision on his the person or persons responsible platform calling for repeal of the for the crasn state sales tax law, leaders of the Rhea campaign withheld comment Tatks to Driver awaiting today's count. j After Chandler had piled up a 'I talked with Emmelt Taylor, lead of more than last night, driver of the bus, within a few Rhea strategists indicated a state- minutes after the Sher- ment would be forthcoming. One iff Darnell said, "and he was not of Rhea's chief advisers privately drinking. I have never known him expressed the opinion Chandler had to drink. He is one of our best won the nomination by a majority citizens." of between and he de- clined to be quoted, saying any' Sheriff Darnell said that Taylor statement would havc to come from j blamed the denne fog for the LONG IS CUT DOWN AT HEIGHT CAREER Senator had Made His Name Household Word Through- out Nation, Across Seas BORN A POOR BOY BATON ROUGE, La.. Sept. 10 Pierce Long, mowed has left his powerful political ma- chine rudderless. P o 1 i tic ally Louisiana was in a whirlpool to- d.iy. It has no direction. The king is dead but there was i no king left to long live. When i Huey Long passed from the poli- WASHINGTON, Sept. 10. tical stage he left a half dozen Both friends and opponents of i political leaders of about the same SEEK 'CROWN PRINCE' Senator Huey P. Long today ex- pressed regret at his passing and joined in denouncing the assass- ination. stripe. None overshadowed the other. If one tried to step ahead pressed regret at his death, the sole topic of con- versation ini ev- ery Baton Rouge Sen.tor LongT household. Many intimate with the senator showed marks of tears. Fourteen members of the Hist field artillery, Louisiana national guard, from New Orleans under His death removed one of the largest question marks from the 1936 presidential race. Official _ jfl Washington expected he would be an independent candidate. Calls for law and order in gov- ernmental affairs were wide- iLf Sass company of infantry here Normally mar. w.uld be w-givcn K. Allen but during nis barraQjw spread. It is seriously disturbing to learn of a resort to unlawful vio- lence as a political weapon any- where in said Secretary Morgenthau. "Detestable" was the word used by Senator Norris (R-Neb) to de- scribe the slaying. Bad Effects "There will be some bad effects he added. "It was un- justified." Norris said: "There was lots of SiaLCiTlCnL WOU1U Iliivt; tu v-.uiuv nvni vm- t----t------------ Mr Rhea or his state campaign crash. He said Taylor told him he down by an assassin's bullet at the could havc giveil the manager, Earl C. Clements. I did not .see the train until he height of his spectacular career, test by that r Sales Tax Repeal I was on the railroad track, too late was an'epic in his own age. No public character of the gen- By ANDRUE BERDIN< Associated Press Foreign S ROME, Sept. Charge Negligence Taylor was forced to leave the and across the seas. Born on August ri isor! -r, good in Huey and that "his heart was right although his method wasn't." "It is intolerable and unthink- able and outrages all decency when people have the ballot and 'ie senator a means with- in a. few weeks without resorting to taking up instruments of mur- entire .political career he has learn- ed heavily on Huey Long, who was a friend from the barefoot boy stage in Winn Parish. Today Gov- ernor Allen was as broken up over his friend's death that he was unapproachable. Before Long's death, but after it was known that he would die, his political Lieutenants held con- ferences on what steps to take. In them were Governor Allen, Sey- mour Weiss, Long political treas- Abe Shushan, director of the Orleans Levee board, Lieut. Gov. James A. Noe, Allen Ellender, speaker of the house; George Wal- lace, Long's legislative adviser, and others. Who Will Rule On one of these six the chances arc the toga of Long will fall but that will be determined in faction caucus later. Whether any one of these can hold the gigantic and all embracing machine on the tracks laid down by the redoubtable Huey in doubt. There was one Huey ___ (Louisville) to Mussolini today ordered a nation- i big bunch of Chandler's total. When cot: wide oneday mobilization of all the1 Fascist forces of Italy. The mob- ilization will test the nation's abil- ity to spring to arms at a mom-. ent's notice. clients, said Brown, approximately Chandler leaders said if the trend Scvcra, on the bus told tiraber_ The order involves mem- i per cent are unemployables who were maintained he Vvoukl have a newspapermen that Taylor was (Continued on page eight) will be cared for by local or state majority of 5.000 in the first clis- wa-.nccl of thc ;ippl.Oach of the motto must always be at bullets'." 'bal- i said in regard to the August primary. They counted Boone com- I from of the !the United States senate has pass- hered and at- salesman to become one of tnc Local Burden 404- der" Senator Bone (D-Wash) said. Long. The state was Long-Long Expressing the same thought, was the state. Father Charles E. Coughlin, De- troit priest, said at Albany that sient bureau are a big bunch of Chandler s ioiai. saici, as hunclrc "d pampered -Ident to his negli- Of the total number of TERA of'the count the, was looked upon as likely presiden- one (Continued on page eight) (Continued on page eijfht) j train, but that he failed to take Leads to Heights W E A T H E R j WAKMKK TENNKSSEK: Fitir in west iincl mostly cloudy in rast portion to-1 night Wednrsduy: somewhat i heed. Thev .said thc whistle oE SEEK TO PREVENT REPETITION OF DISASTER WHICH KILLED 410 T i tho train was blown three or four times as a warning. Thc'iicvcn injured, brought to tilt1 rnmnumity for treat- were released ycslcrclay af- Icr :i thorough examination -show- In b? noL seriously hurt, said.' J. M. D.-msherty. Jr.. and Long's obsession for power led him to tremendous heights of dar- ing and bravado that left his ene- mies nonplussed and made him both revered and hated. He achieved the unprecedented power to rule his na.tive state of Louisiana like a monarch of old, beat flown and subjected corporate wealth, single-handedly defied the Stales Senate and openly most colorful member of ed said Senator Donahey Shock, sorrow and wonder about the political effect cf his death The death of Long also aroused the anti-Long politicians. They are out to catch up any political material that may drift away from the Long faction camp. Long's death may reunite the old regulars in thc city of New Orleans headed by Mayor T. Sem- as a precautionary measure aftee Long was wounded. Senator Long's passing, follow- ing the violent death nearly 31 hours earlier of his assassin, Dr. Carl Austin Weiss, promient and cultured 29-year-old Baton RougTS eye specialist, struck the capital a dual blow. Grieve Death Friends and enemies alike griev- ed the death. To his friends hero had been taken. To his en- emies a ruthless but brilliant po- litical warrior had passed on. A hushed atmosphere pervaded the city. The customary bustle was notably absent. Gone was its most colorful fig- ure. Although news of the death. traveled like wild fire, its reality seeped but slowly into the minda of the inhabitants. "Huey's dead" rolled off tongues of every one, but all were met witJT tho- task of adjustjrjjj their minds to that fact. Huey Long was tthe chief topic of discussion in every Baton Rougo household. He had becn for years. He still was today and probably will remain so for many days to come, but he was no longer Heavy Gloom Gloom hung heaviest about the towering 33-story state capitol, erected by Long during his reign mes Walmsley, most of whose fol- j as governor and scene of his Ba- lowers deserted to the ranks of ton Rouge political activities. minted in vary ng degrees iu the Huey Long after the Long control-! State employes, Long-loyal to a tlv-ouchout the nation. led legislature had driven the city man, gathered in small groups ital and throughout tne nation. :__ 5vjl.tua, bankruptcy. Long] and discussed their chief's death cap Hints Representative (Continued on page eight) Fenerty 
                            

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