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Kingsport News Newspaper Archive: October 14, 1957 - Page 1

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   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - October 14, 1957, Kingsport, Tennessee                             Attend Hospital-Chest Mass Meeting Tonight Deathless Days City County 59 Slow up here and show up there. KING SPORT NEWS VOL. 85 KINGSPORT, TENN., MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1957 Pkom CIrcl. 8 PAGES, 5 CENTS The Weather IKIUJ little warmer. Tuesday partly cloudy and a Uttle mild. sunny and a little warmer today. Tuesday fair and mild. E. II. Medcrauer Hugh Dulaney Fund Drive Is Two-Fold Tonight citizens of Kingsport will gather at the -Civic Auditoriui: (or Ihc traditional Community Chest Mass Meeting. This year the annual campaign Is two-fold. It will raise fo an expansion program at, the Holston Valley Community Hospita and lor the Chest agencies. Prior to Uie Hospital-Chest mass meeting early arrivals will b entertained by. a concert by tl: Dobyns-Bennett High Scho Drive Teams Are Listed EGYPT'S UNITS IN SYRIA Rocket Shell Is Watched Sputnik's Companion Is Stealing Show Late Col. Palmer Praised At Dedication Of Center WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 OP Sputnik's rocket companion stole the show today with a brilliant per- formance for amateur skywatch ers and qualified for possible top billing on the scientific stage too. "I rather think we'll learn more for a while from observing the rocket than the satellite said a spokesman for the Nava Research Laboratory's Projec Vanguard, center of U.S. satellite efforts. The rocket, which went into an earth-circling orbit of its own while giving Sputnik its final boos ____ ______ Into space, Is now believed bj Dobyns-Bcnnctt High School scientists to be loslni that would end with its burning under the direction of Paul Ar- altitude In the first stages nf a fa] ringlon. T. M. Divine, drive chairman, says preliminary work of the campaign is completed. "We have done all we know to do to put the story before all the up like a meteorite in the earth's atmosphere. "We know It Is losing altitude." the spokesman said, but added plunge will come people. We think most of the people: that whether the t of this area are aware of basic facts. "We have made plans to see to It that cvervone who earns a llv- months has not The following is list of Hospi fnl-Communlly Chest Campaigning In Kmgsport has an opportu teams: (The first listed name In nity to fulfill his duty as a Divine said. Teams Organized He said approximately 200 men have been teams to do tion. yet been calculated. Sputnik Itself showed up apparently right on schedule. Dr. .lohn P. Hagen, Vanguard direc- tor. has said that the satellite will maintain a fixed orbit and staj' up the actual a year or more. The burnl-out rocket remnant. less dense than the tightly packed satellite, is believed to be more each division Is team chairman.) E Weber, and members of Bar Association. AUTO and AUTO SITPLIKS Hobert Looncy, MnlUiew C. A. Whiltaker. E jj Niederauer will serve as! in Ihe extremely rarefied atmos-jfi-om many BASKS and coordinator for the induslriaMpherc where the two bodies are imonies. Woodard. J B. Catron, William learns. Hugh Dulaney will serve! orbiting. In the same capacity lor the down-j And tho ilRntweight satellite equipped with miniature Instru Hundreds See Event Crippled Children's Center Opened "Good neighbor of Kingsport and good neighbor of was one of many tributes paid to mem- ory of the late Colonel E. W. Palm- er at the dedication of the Palmer Memorial Center for Crippled Chil- dren Sunday afternoon. This tribute came from Earl Schenck Miers, American author of books dealing with the Civil War period of American history and long a personal friend of the late Colonel Palmer. Miers was one of several speak- ers at the dedication ceremonies, held on the grounds of the new Center. Several hundred citizens of Kings- port and the surrounding area joined with members of the Ten- nessee Society lor Crippled Chil- subject to frictional slowing down dren and Adults, Inc., and visitors points at the cere- town teams. Both say they have complete teams to cover every part of ness and industry. "There is a fine spirit of en- thusiasm among the team mem- they repprt. The distributing and collecting pledge cards start Marsh, William A. Slcln. BEAUTY and RAlinER SHOPS Sutton, Coy Meadc, E. R. Medlln. CHAIN P. Williams, W. E. Gardner, A. D. Leachman, Wayne Powell, E. R. Elkins. CONSTRUCTION and ALLIF.ri Cassel, B. O. Rlpley, Harry Steaiiman, Charles McNe'ill. William C. Lady, Dr. Frank J. Buckles. Dr. James B. Elliott, Dr. J. Robert Hodge. Dr. W. P. Johnson. DRUG STORES-R. R. Ross, George Armour. FURNITURE and APPLIANCES Gillette, Kenneth Bingham, Divine explained there is an Olen Pierce, John Gruber, Bige! error in the fact sheet which will Shell. J. W. Arnold, Pete Peters. I be distributed. The error shows Isley, member- the total cost of the expansion to which the United sates Philip Farnham, chairman of Palmer Memorial Committee, which undertook the memorial project shortly after the death of plans to send up is believed likely colonel Palmer in November, 1953, early Tuesday morning, they said. Final Briefinfr Before tonight's mass meeting the teams wiil meet for a briefing. They will instructions and their pledge cards, campaign material and literature. They will then attend the mass meeting In a group. behave more like the rocket than like Sputnik. While the Naval Laboratory wouldn't discuss this aspect of the rocket study, other scientific sources said that obviously all pos- sible Information about what hap- pens to the Russian rocket when final re-enters will be of the dense atmosphere absorbing interest to receive last minute I u-s- technicians trying to develop receive last minute intprcontmental balljstic mis. sile weapon. ship of Junior Chamber of Com- merce. INSURANCE and RF.AI. ESTATE J. T. Parker. F. E. McGlaughon, John Wimberly, Val Edwards. LAUNDRIES and Hiram Wall, H. K. F. Mire. MANUFACTURERS, SMALL William Lacy, Albert Lowe, Miles Ellis. L. F. Kent, E. E. White, James B. Tubbs, Watson O. Guy, W. Kirk Allen. W. M. Schotanus, L. Palmer Young. Gib- son Davis, Henry- Atkins, Carl H. Bates. Pitscr M. Lyons HI, W. Paul Hall. MOTELS and Sidney Miller. ..lames Miller. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Harry P. Mills, Frank Rule, Raleigh Hampton, Stewart Mc- Corkle, James H. Page. Howard Poston, Walter Allen, Gorden Ket- tering. M a c k Ray Fred Barter. W. P. Major. RETAIL Downtown E. M. Keilly. Ralph Grant. Joe Williams. Ka'rl Ketron. Bob Beck Carl Slabbeikorn, Jess Godwin Queen Tells Canadians and reason for the com-! f campaign and the yardsticks; JL ie among the items explain- I be The correct figure SI. Community Chest budgets, over- 1 go: bined c: be ed at tonight's meeting. The amount needed for the uspital is To this is add- ed in State and Federal 'unds: Ford Foundation, reserve from previous hospital campaign. and funds from depreciation and reserves accounts, A total of New directors for the Commu- nity Chest will be elected at the mass meeting. Moonshiners Are Raided Several moonshiners in the OTTAWA. Oct. 13 I.T1 Queen Elizabeth n told Canadians to- nishl. in her first live television speech she hopes to come see them again in two years, and per- haps bring her two children ior a visit. In English and French, the 31- year-old Queen thanked the people for their hospitality on her visit in 1951 as a princess, apologized for staying only four days this time, and said she hopes she will be back in 1959 (or the St. Law- rence Seaway opening. "We hope." she said, including her husband Prince Philip who is with her now. "we hope that one day we shall be able to bring our children here." Her visit in 1959 will be more presided at yesterday's event, open- t by an invocation given by Dr. E. Gibson Davis. Keys to the new Palmer Me- morial Center ware presented by D. S. Sample, chairman of the. Palmer Memorial Campaign Fund, on behalf of 2.600 donors, to Usif Haney. president of Tennessee- Virginia Cerebral Palsy Center, Inc. Children receiving treatment at training at the Cerebral Palsy Cen- ter are now permanently housed ill the new building. It was designed by William H. Wallace, A. I. A. and built entire- ly from funds contributed volun- tarily by area citizens and friends of Colonel Palmer throughout the nation. James C. Write, Tennessee East- mnn Co. president, paid tribute to Colonel Palmer as a successful in- dustrial leader. The Rev. Leicester F. Kent lauded him as a religious man In the dedicatory prayer. Singing the Lord's Prayer by Bar- bara Jean Shoemaker, iflST gradu- ate of Tennessee-Virginia Cerebral Palsy Center, now a student at Mll- ligan College, closed the outdoor ceremonies. Highlight of the entire program was the talk by Miers, who was presented by Walter F. Smith, pres- ident of Kingsport Press and long time associate of Colonel Palmer. "Nature cannot again produce one like him." the tribute once paid Leonardo da Vinci by one of the artist's favorite pupils, was quoted by Miers in reference to Colonel Palmer. "For many years as president of THERAPIST SHOWS CON- NIE SUE on the arms of her father, HAROLD SPARKS Sr., is absorbed in watching physical therapist, VIOLET POGORZELSKI, "administer theraphy on doll HAROLD Jr., 7, also shares his sister's interest. Magistrates In Hawkins Face Problem ROGERSVILLE. Oct. 13 istrates are expected to attack the problem of rapidly diminishing funds when Hawkins County Court meets in regular quarterly session here Monday. County Judge John K. Williams, of Surgoinsville, said last week that a plan to revise property tax as- sessments in the county would "probably" be introduced during Monday's meetinc. Conservative county officials had estimated property reassessment would net the, county from S30.000 East Germany Pulls Fast One On Currency Change BERLIN, Oct. 13 a protest to the Russians nist East Germany sealed off itsUjrainst what they regarded as a people from the outside world to-1 violation of the four-power occn- day while it pushed through a blitz pation accord on free German currency changeover that cost the traffic wil to SSO.OOO revenue. annually in increased Blairs Gap section of business Sundav were out out extensive, she said. Her present the National Society for Crippled, stay, confined to Ottawa, ends! Children and Adults, and for many] ments' Tax Assessor James Ferrell has stated that reassessment is the only answer to properly tax problems in the county. He said that his office flooded with com- the annual assess- is continually plaints about as officers raided and captured four stills. Sullivan County Constable J. F. Crawford said the four stills were Wednesday when she goes to the United States. "In 1959 I am hoping to be pros- Hay wood Modlin. J. H. Harrison Jr.. Jack VaUThn. RETAIL STORES. Solan Campbell, P. T. Nottinphr.m, C. E. Sanciidne. Sieve Becker. Bon Caiv- er. Frank Berl Ogle. George i all located in the loth District'of ent when the St. Lawrence Sea- Sullivan County, mile radius in about a is opened." she explained, I "and then i hope to take that The stills were described as twojcnance to travd more and two of (he copper across the country." The officer said no arrests The Queen did not ignore Cana- years more as the Society's first I beloved president en elder stateman. Colo exerted an influence upon Ameri- can life that no sound social his- torian of our times properly should the noted author and his- torian said. "The National Society was a small, scattered and somewhat However. Ferrell has asked for 'and a per monih incrcasc in his lone Palmer salary thn Projral is lonei rainier sMary js month_ Reassessment project was first West millions. In a surprise broadcast at a.m. Prime Minister Otto Grote- ordered the 1 million East Germans to surrender their mon- ey for the new currency before police and officials p.m. Communist immediately began herding sleepy-eyed citizens to emereency conversion centers In banks, schools, factories and restaurants to get the new bills at the ex- change rate of one for one. Each citizen was allowed cash for what he surrendered, up to 300 S16 at the Western exchange rate. The Reds promised the balance could be drawn from banks starting next Saturday. Western experts said this will give the Stalinist regime a de- tailed accounting of the money held by each citizen and open the way for a new squeeze on what voiced during the special session of i little private business remains. the court on Aug. 5, but no action] The old East German currency thin Berlin and on the autobahn link to West Germany. Travel is expected to return to normal tomorrow. In his broadcast the East Ger- man Premier charged that East marks had been hoarded in West Germany and West Berlin for cur- rency speculation and for the fi nancing of espionage organiza tions. Grotewohl said the conver- sion would make these holding! worthless. Millions of East marks have piled up in the hands of West Ber- lin and West German banks, open market exchange offices, business- men, speculators and various of- ficial agencies. Middle East Tension Up Air Force, Navy Cover Landing DAMASCUS, Oct. 13 ian troops landed In Syria today or the first lime In modern his- ory to reinforce this country's defense against aggression from ny direction, a communique nounced. The joint Syrian-Egyptian Com- mand here said the Egyptians dis- embarked at the Mediterranean port of Latakia. The number and destination of he troops was not Riven. The Egyptian Middle East News Agen- cy reported In a Cairo dispatch :hat they landed under cover of Egyptian naval units and planes of both nations. The- Egyptian reinforcements were viewed here as connected with mounting Turkish-Syrian bor- der tension. Informed Egyptian sources said specialists and technicians from Egypt were already on hand. They reported these men had been flown in since mid-September. Armed forces of both Egypt and Syria, long closely allied, get their arms from the Soviet bloc. The common source of their weapons and ammunition should simplify their supply situation In any joint operations. (There was no Immediate com- ment in Washington from the Slate Department on develop- nenls. (The U.S. 6th Fleet Is In the .lecliterranean on training exer- cises. When trouble developed in Jordan last May the fleet was sent into the eastern Mediterra- nean to exert a calming Influence on the Middle East. There was no indication whether it might be re- deployed in the light of today's developments.) Both Syrian and Egyptian air squadrons, which fitted out with Soviet planes, gave the Egyptian naval units air cover on their way from Egypt to Syria, the communique said. It added that the Egyptian na- val units will begin "a "formal vis- it" in the Syrian port Monday. The move was taken under the two countries' mutual defense agreement which provides for joint military action in the face of aggression or the threat of aggres- sion against either country. Syria's Army Chief of staff Maj. Gen. Afif Bizry and Intelli- gence Chief Lt. col. Abdul Hamid Serraj went to Cairo early in Sep- tember to discuss strengthening the pact. Afterward Bizry an- nminred that joint plans for any contingency had been developed and said the armed forces of the two countries were considered a single unit, under Egyptian com- mand. The Moscow radio said that So- viet Vice Adm. V. F. Kotov had :alks in Damascus with Bizry and Serraj while a Soviet naval squad- ron was visiting Syria late last month. From a military viewpoint Egyptian units would be of little help against such a strong power as Turkey. But the move indicates readiness to active the Syrian- Egyptian joint command in case of renewed hostilities with Israel. The situation has been marked by rough lalk from both Washing- ton and Moscow. U. S. Secretary of State Dulles told the world the Over The Coffee Cup was taken at that time. It was sug-j issue of about five billion mark gcsted that the plan be made a part j became valueless except for of a school bonds issue coins and bills up to one mark, (stores these davs. 1 As Red police and I United States would defend Tur- key against any aggression. Ni- kita Khrushchev, Soviet strong man, announced the Soviet Union will defend Syria against any at- tack. The joint military command is also supposed to include the array of Saudi Arabia, all under By BILL FREEHOFF tlan Armv Commander Gen. Ab- Napkin rings, del Hakim Amer. That's a slow mover in Jewelry! TV interview before the 600 da's industrial advances and eco-l Todd. TRANSPORTATION William King. Roy Moore. Paul Bellamy. UTILITIES and COMMUNICA- Miller, John Wil- son. Clarence Bryan. MrCon- r.ell. Howard Pridcmore. Claude Ovcrbay, Gene Lockhartt Paul Gentry, Kenneth Wright. Ralph Kintr. J. White. J. D. Blackburn, S. R. Shriver. Lee Davis. George Peters. Bob Neeley, Counterspy Morros Tells Of Luck That Saved Him By F.PMONn LEBRKTON WASHINGTON. Oct. 13 i.T> Counterspy Boris Morros says a chance decision-to catch a plane instead of a train saved him from kidnaping by Soviet agents And he says he has since learned the kidnap squad was waiting in Vienna. the credit to the staff and the trained and I am willing to meet the Colonel half way. From year to ycnr the staff grew better, the number of trained professionals increased be- cause the 'darn old businessman' insisted they must." Open house for visitors continues through today at .the new Palmer Memorial Center, with members of Illicit irjui 11 West Berlin. Pedestrians enteritis! Linen napkins are still used for! East Berlin from the West wereilormal dinners, of course, but not! picked up by police or questioned with napkin napkins are! Tne House Committee on Un-lthe Civinette Club serving as spe- American Activities made avail- able records of some of the inter- views Its staff members had with cial hostesses, although visitors are always welcome during regular A 15-month-old girl was rclcas-i ed from Ihe hospital hist night! after receiving emergency treat-1 ment for an over-dose of baby! aspirin. Dcbra Bear, 2116 W. Sullivan, was received at Holston Valley Community Hospital at p.m. jand searched on the Western officials met to consld- washed after the dinner Is Sighted Sessions of the annual meeting of John Poieat. Sam Anderson Jr.. ,innllv Ol his 10.vear William Prat-man. jMorros fM he a sin-! The Russian-Born motion pic-1 the Tennessee Socictv for Crippled and Di F.ank OConnel word Mure producer is crcdiicd with a I Children and Adults beine held in nr I vie Smitli Dr'l.T '9 Mlmtcn- u role in breaking the espion-1 Kingsport for the first lime, ccn- Heeo. ur. ainnn. ur. prearranged signal ring that included the also through today. I America that his life was in 
                            

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