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Kingsport News Newspaper Archive: August 18, 1949 - Page 1

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Location: Kingsport, Tennessee

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   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - August 18, 1949, Kingsport, Tennessee                             The Weather Tennesxoe: Cloudy, warm, Beat- tend Virginia: Cloudy, Bcnttercd Little Change in temperature in KINGSPORT NEWS VOL. 38 KINGSPORT, TENN., THURSDAY, AUGUST 12 PAGES, 5 CENTS Today's Skies sum-lull a.m. Sunn.tt MoonrlAe Krldky a.m. New Moon Auntut 33 PROMINENT STARS: Arcturui. dun p.m.; El clow fa Moon. VISIBLE PLANETS: Venui. low in p.m.: Juolter. >it> a.m.: Marc. a.m. (All Timel Eaiura Stamford) U. S. ISSUES RED RELATIONS FEELER ArmProgram Touches Off Hot Debate Norman Thomas Makes Plea For Disarmament Tru- man's Foreign Arms Program touched off hot debate in the House Wednesday, while So- cialist Norman Thomas urged Con- gress to delay the measure and try first to bring about universal dis- armament. The House rang with arguments for and against the historic plan to help arm "friendly nations" abroad. Military aid from the U. S. Is urgently needed because Western Europe lives in the shadow of the huge Russian Army, Bald Chairman Kw (D-WVa) of the Foreign Af- fairs Committee, fight for approval of the full program. Russia is not maintaining 200 armed divisions "for the mere purpose of parades." he declared. -Insane Program "This is an insane program, a program of war." declared Rep. Marcantonio of New York, only i American Laborite in the House, i What has happened in the coun- of Europr, ho said, WBH purely were purely domestic." BS' a vote of 275 to 47 approving procedure under which the debate began, the House indicated that the bill has strong support. This vote was not a true test of sentiment on the measure, however, since members often vote to allow a bill to come up and then oppose it when their amendments are rejected. Forma] Blessing The arms aid program received a formal blessing from a majority of the House Foreign Affairs Com- mittee in a report made public be- fore the debate began. But Norman Thomas, the peren- nial presidential candidate of the Socialist Party, com- mittee that Congress should take the lead in an effort to achieve world disarmament before any fur- ther expenditures are made in "the ghastly arms race." Thomas testified before the com- bined Committee on Foreign Re- lations and Armed Services, which reopened hearings Tuesday in or- der to hear him and opponents of the program, including Henry Wal- lace. Senator George (D-Ga) sub- to Thomas' suggestion for a congressional disarmament ap- peal. The Georgian said he thinks United States should be moving in a direction different from the one it taking. (See ARMS, Page 12) BEE CAUSES WRECK A bee stung Adolph Reiden, 19, Brooklyn, N. Y., and caused him to lose control of his auto. Result: Four of the seven occupants wound up in the hospital. They are David Nadelman, 53, his wife, Frieda, 51; Gisela Reiden, and Ralph Reiden, 'all are from Brooklyn. The victims are awaiting arrival of help. The accident occurred in Blanchester, O. (NEA Telephoto.) 2 Guard Units Roughing It In Heavy Rain By CAPT. DICK BAH.EY For Fort Jackson, S. C. Kingsport's two National Guard companies are really out in the field now, roughing it in a wooded bivouac area 14 miles from the post, but so far there hasn't been any bathing problems. Mass shower baths were the or- der of the evening around supper time Tuesday when a deluge of rain hit the camp. The Columbia Record quoted the U. S. Weather Bureau as statins seven inches of rainfall was recorded in 24 the heaviest 24-hour rainfall ever to hit Columbia, according to weather ob- servers." Dine Out Supper was eaten under vehicles, trees and rain. No tents were washed away, but Sgts. Joe Over- bay and W. K. Nelms swore a boat passed through their tent. Charles Weatherford, Riley Lin- kous. Paul Whittimorc and Joe B. White kept radio communications gaing all night, covering the equip- ment with their raincoats. Homer Forbis and Orval Gardner kept the food up to standard in spite of the rain. (See GUARD, Page 12) General Ike Has Grin For Words Of Sen. Styles Deven If Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower grinned Wednesday end xaid: "I'm surprised that Sen. Bridges knows so many things I don't know about." The Columbia University presi- dent and wartime Allied Forces commander is in Colorado on a va- cation. Sen. Styles Bridges (R-NH) told R group of at Concord N. H.. Monday night he believes Eisenhower might accept the Re- publican nomination for the presi- dency in 1952. Eisenhower, suntanned and af- fable, said "I'm not going around thumping my chest and telling every newspaperman that I won't be president of the United States. That would be silly." Petition For Annexation Up To Commission Next in cfforta of 2150 Forest ,awn residents to get their subdi- vision admitted into the city limits will be up to the Municipal Plan- ning Commission. When thn Planning Commission will consider the petition -could not Ban Against Paved Street Parking May Be Amended Main Purpose Of Present Ordinance Is To Clear Streets For Sweeping Equipment By BILL, BARNETT A city law against parking on paved streets after midnight soon may be lifted everywhere except in the business district. City Attorney H. Marvin Parsons has been instructed by of Mayor and Aldermen" to draw up an ordinance'amending the p'resent law to limit the restriction to the first fire district, an area roughly corresponding to the main business district. A suggestion for the change came up at the regular Board meeting Tuesday night hi connection with discussion of a Labor Day celebra- tion street dance to be held Sep- tember 5. The dance is scheduled be learned definitely Wednesday night. The commission meets ir- regularly, as Its chairman, E. W. Palmer, is frequently out of town. Date Not Set Allen N. Dryden, Planning Com- mission Becretary, said Wednesday night the date of the August meet- ing had not been set. He said Colonel Palmer was In Canada, and he did not know just when he would return to the city. A petition signed by 250 freehold- ers asking annexation of Forest La.vrn Subdiviaion into the city was presented to the Board of Mayor and Alderman Tuesday night -by E. 2. Johnson and was referred by the Board to the Planning Commission for review and recommendations. City Recroder City Recorder J. R. Pecktal, who keeps the minutes of Board meet- ings, said Wednesday night it was his impression it will be up to the Planning Commission also to decide what If any weight Is to be given to a petition being circulated by J. P. Hurley against annexation of the area. Legally a petition such as Hur- ley's would have no weight to stop the wheels of annexation.., A peti- tion asking annexation, signed by (See PETITION, Page 12) to last until 1 a.m., one hour after the normal deadline for moving motor vehicles off the street. Clear Streets Main purpose of the ordinance is to clear the streets for city street flushing and sweeping equipment to clean them. City Manager D W. Moulton said he believed very any street cleaning was residential districts after little if done in midnight. Most of the cleaning in residential flections Is done during the day, he said. Several Board members were of the opinion if any street cleaning is done in residential sections after midnight it should be stopped so as not to awaken people by the noise. Present Law It also was pointed out that the present law works a hardship on automobile owners who do not have garages and especially on visi- tors in the city, who have no facili- ties for parking off the street in many cases and frequently have to (See PARKING, Page 12) Good Morning A Little Chuckle To Start The Day Woolstock, la. Two rac- coons picked a pair of high ten- sion lines on which to do their sparking. They scumpcrcd up a pule and begun frolicking on the two lines carrying alternating current from Webster City to Woolstock. Linemen said the two 'coons, one on each wire, apparently en- gaged in an affectionate rubbing of noxes. Tbis closed the circuit and two 'coons became one. Wife Reveals Cache From Nashville Bank Robbery Louisville. Police dug deeper Wednesday into the record of an FBI-labeled notorious public enemy charged here with the mur- der of a patrolman, after they came up with a cache. Mrs. June Bircham, 26, wife of the accused slayer-bank robber, Tuesday night led officers to a farm the money- after telling of a aeries of holdups in several states. Officers said the former Tennes- see farm girl told them the money wax part of the loot taken from the Centennial branch of the American National Bank, Nashville, Aug. 1. Police said Mrs. Bircham ad- mitted driving one of the getaway oars used .in the robbery. Suit was filed here by bank agalnnt the accused robber, Earl D. Bircham, 45, The suit charges he robbed the bank of He denied It and other accusations. Bircham is charged with fatally shooting Patrolman Johnny Tenny- son and seriously wounding Patrol- man John A. Ross here Sunday night. His wife told police he also held up the Columbia Mantel Com- pany here July 2. City Alderman Joseph D. Detrick was wounded in the jaw in this holdup when a bullet fired by the gunman into the floor ricocheted Police said about was taken After lengthy questioning, Mrs Bircham told detectives the Nash- ville bank loot was hidden near West Point, Ky. She then led Police Lt. Ellis Joseph, threo detectives and an FBI agent to the farm on the Stitcs Station Road. She failed on her first attempt to find the place. Then she recog- the road Pointing to the spot, Mrs. Bircham directed the officers up a 15-foot embankment. After digging around a few minutes, the money was found. Joseph said the money .vas in a nolo about a foot deep and wan Senate Acts On Truman Labor Plan 4 Other Plans In Effect On Friday Washington The Senate approved two of President Tru- man's government reorganization plans Wednesday. One of thorn, officially called Plan No. 2, gave the stripped-down jabor Department a potent trans- 'usion by transferring to it the iob finding and unemployment compensation functions now han- dled by the Federal Security Agen- cy. The other, Plan No. 7, transfers ;he Public Roads Administration to the Department of Commerce. It now is in the recently organized eneral Services Administration leaded by Jess Larson. Friday Midnight These plans and four others are due to take effect at midnight Fri- day. Plan No. 1, however, which called for the creation of a new Cabinet-rank Department of Wel- fare, was killed Tuesday by an ad- verse Senate vote. President Truman submitted the seven reorganization plans in June. Under a Inw passed thin year, uuch plans KO into offnct flo duyn uftnr submission, provided that neither house of Congress disapproves them by a majority of its full member- ship. Opposition Plans No. 1, 2 and 7 met with opposition in the Senate Expendi- tures Committee. Separate resolu- tions of disapproval were forwarded to the Senate. No. 1 was disap- proved Tuesday night by a vote of 60 to 32. But the resolution expressing dis- approval of Plan No. 2 received only 32 votes, with 57 against the resolution. The disapproval resolu- tion would have had to have re- ceived 40 votes for the plan to be-junked.---- Plan No. 7 came through 47 to 40, with opponents of the .shift nine votes short of the showdown. House Action The House has no action sched- uled on the plans, so that barring some unforeseen hitch they will go into effect Friday midnight. An unusual combination of 23 Democrats and 24 Republicans up- held the presidential plan. Many of the Republicans who had voted against the previous Truman pro- posals backed him on this one. (See PLANS, Page 12) Walter Poston Is Victim Of Heart Attack Funeral services for Walter F. Poston, former resident and old- time athlete of Kingsport, who died at his home in Toledo, Ohio, Wednesday, will be held Friday at 3 p.m. at Eggleston Funeral Home. Burial will be at Lake Cemetery, Toledo. No details were immediately available except that Poston was found dead in bed, presumably of heart failure, at his home. TWO AWARDS are waiting for J. F. Archer of the Kings- port area, who assisted in saving the life of Floyd Brown (center) recently. Efforts by the Kingsport Safety Council to locate Archer, who is believed to live along the Holston River near Rotherwood, have proved futile. He is requested to contact the Kingsport Times-News so that he may be given his life-saving awards. Brown was saved from death by drowning by Archer, Charles Patrick of Cherokee Motors (left) and Henry Hall, TEC employe (in the bed.) At the time photograph was made, Hall was recuperating from an operation. Sen. Mundt Calls General Vaughan Bargain Finagler Outburst Comes As Former Employe Reveals General Put On Heat Over Molasses Deal Washington Senator Mundt (R-SD) Wednesday called M'. Gen. Harry Vaughan a "finagling bargainer" full of "intimidation, bluff and and Senator McCarthy (R-Wis) demanded that John Maragon be indicted for perjury. Vaughan is President Truman's Army aide. Maragon, a onetime Kansas City shine boy, has become the friend of a Washington official, in- cluding Vaughan, Mundt's outburst camtTat a Sen- ate investigations, subcommittee hearing after a former Agriculture Department employe said that Vaughan had put the heat on him to give more sugar to a New Jersey molasses company. The employe, Herbert C. Hathorn, said Vaughan mode the attempt back in the days of sugar Objection To Radio Jams By Reds Aired U. S. Ambassador Kirk Meets Stalin For Talks On Lend-Lease And U. S. Complaint On America Voice Jam Washington U. S. Ambassador Alan G. Kirk out feelers for improvements in Russian-American relations on two touchy issues when he held his first talk with Premier Stalin in Moscow Monday night. Secretary of State Acheson told a news conference Wednesday that Kirk had mentioned personally to Stalin: 1. American objections to Soviet jamming of the Voice of America radio programs to Russia and 2. American hopes for a windup'S of the Russian lend-leasc settle- ments that have dragged on now since the end of the last war. Stalin, who treated Kirk in a courteous and friendly manner, made no particular commitment on either point. Acheson simply re- Shirley May To Attempt Channel Swim Dover, Eng. Shirley May. Molasses Sugar France's attempt to swim the I Hatnorn said the flrm Vaughan English Channel was postponed, wanted t the r f the Al_ Wednesday because of a breeze Molasses Co., of Perth Am_ Strait "P PS boy, N. J., had been a "flagrant and Tho 17-year-old American girl, willful violator" of a department or- ('or suspending It from receiving nocludcd in a scaaldii hotel morc moiaaaus. Hathorn said Vaughan made it Walter F. Poaton, Known as "Shorty" to a host of friends, Poston was one of the first football players of Kingsport High School, playing from 1921 through 1924. He was captain of the team of 1921 and 1922, playing at half- back. "Oldtime fans will remember Shorty for his fighting spirit and enthusiasm which made him an outstanding player and leader on the said Mayor E. B. Blank- enbecler, who was on the Kingsport team with Poston. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. iVcra Mary Pooton, one son, Thom- Kcmper Poston, one daughter, 'Joretta Belle Poston, all of Toledo, and one brother, Robert F. (Frog) I Poston of KlnRHport. i Walter Poston was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. K. Poston, pioneer residents of Kingsport. The father died Jan. 22, 1929 and Mrs. Poston, mother died April 2, A slater Ella Sue died In 1D33. Gris Nez at about a.m. Her headquarters hero had an- nounced a state of alert at 10 a.m. when the morning weather fore- cast looked promising for the fol- lowing 24 hours. Labor Day To Be Big Time In Old Town There'll be a hot time in the old town the night of September 5. Kingsport's first full-scale Labor Day celebration in the city's history, with a parade and public speaking already in the an- nounced plans, will be climaxed by dancing in the street from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Authority for the street dance was obtained by the celebration planners Tuesday night from the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. The Board granted the Kingsport Cen- tral Labor Union permission to rope off a block of Broad Street between Market and Center for the occasion. _.. j publication of a daily newspaper City Safety Direc-j fn Kinggport. tor John Martin agreed the law; This article from the Kingsport against parking on the streets after Times years ago may mterest you: A classified ad said: "If you want hair braids made, phone 68-M." "In this said Mundt, "he was a finagling bargainer." Mundt continued, "I have been unduly charitable, and I just want to say, I don't like it all." Perjury Demand McCarthy made his demand for a perjury indictment of Maragon aft- er Milton R. Polland testified that he paid Maragon by check and in cash, to help get Allied Molasses more sugar. Polland is a Milwaukee insurance man whose nephew, Harold W. Ross, is president of Allied. Last month Maragon appeared before the subcommittee at a closed session. Testifying under oath, Maragon said then that he never had been (See PROBE, Page 12) This fall .the Kingsport Times- News will 'celebrate the Twenty- Fifth Anniversary of the first midnight can- be relaxed, until 1 a.m. in blocks of the business district adjacent to the one roped off. ported that both matters were referred by the Russian Premier to the Soviet Foreign Office. Russian Jamming In the name news conference in which he disclosed Kirk's approach to Stalin on tbono two relatively secondary Achenon Inuued a statement denouncing the Russian jamming. He declared the State Department's Intention to throw reenforcements Into its effort' to reach the Russian people if Con- gress will grant the necessary funds. Acheson recalled that the jam- ming operation against the Voice of America (and the British Broad- casting Corporation's Russian pro- grams) began four months ago. More than 250 different jamming transmitters have been identified (See STALIN, Page 12) Shriners Will Invade City This Saturday Approximately persons, in- cluding an estimated Shriners of Bast Tennessee and other points, are expected to be in Kingsport Saturday for the Kerbcla Temple Shrine Ceremonial, parade and fes- tivities. Officially opening at B a.m., when Nobles will begin registering at the Kingsport Inn, the ceremonial will be an all-day affair, highlighted by a huge parade beginning at 1 p.m. In the downtown area. Besides members of the Kings- port Shrine Club in full regalia, the colorful parade will include elabo- rate floats, a clown band, and visit- ing Shrine officials, patrols, and dignitaries. The program also includes meet- ings of different sections of the Temple, a dinner at J. Fred John- son Stadium, and a dance Saturday (See SHRINE, Page 12) 2 Women Hurt In Accident Abingdon, Va. Two An- N. C., women were in George Ben Johnston Memorial Hospital here Wednesday night with undetermined injuries suffered when they were thrown from a pick-up truck shortly before noon. State Trooper Ralph Stapleton said the truck, driven by Jack Mostcller, skidded on a wet curve just beyond Holston Bridge, about seven miles north of Abingdon on Route 19. The two injured women, Mrs. D. A. Mosteller, mother of the driver, and Mrs. V. A. Vincent, were thrown from improvised seats in the truck bed. Several other passengers were not injured, Stapleton said. Federal Rent Control Will Be Lifted Over Wide Area Director Woods Says rent con- trols will be lifted by Oct. 1 in one- third of the area they are now ef- fective, Housing Expediter Tighe E. Woods announced Wednesday. He said a cut in the congressional appropriation for his office's budget forced the move. Communities of more than probably will not be affected by the cut, and areas in which mili- tary establishments are located will remain under control, Woods said. About counties now are un- der rent ceilings which arc effec- tive until next June said. Up to 350 of these will bo freed of the ceilings within the next four to six weeks. Half of the arciui to be removed from control will be listed "within a week or 10 Woods said, and the rest will be announced in a sec- ond list sometime before Oct. 1. The housing expediter and his top regional advisers will meet in Washington Thursday to' discuss the first list, he said. "We will look at the smallest and least populated areas first and grad- ually go into larger communities we have Woods explained. "The cuts will be countrywide, not concentrated in any one particular section." The decontrolling will not be done, in all instances, by areas, Woods explained. In some cases, large areas may be reduced in size. "If any of the decontrolled areas get out of Woods warned, "we will come right back in." "Congress has given us the job of enforcing the law." he went on, "and If I have to go to Congress at the end of the year for more funds to enforce it, that is what I will do." Woods said the budget of his of- fice for the 1950 year was slashed by the Senate form million and then cut further to by the I conference committee of both houses. The cut in funds, he said, was made "in spite of the fact that every metropolitan office has re- ported an increase in workload of from 30 to CO per cent and process- ing of landlord petitions and ten- ants' petitions is runing' weeks be- hind. "This meant a 36 per cent reduc- tion some place. I had the choice of cutting off 35 per cent of the people or cutting out about 35 per cent of our areas, beginning with the smallest, and then having good, efficient rent control in the rent of the country. "This is not a move toward liqui- dation of rent control. We are going to be just as tough." Woods disclosed the rent decontrol move In a speech at the 28th na- tional convention of the Disabled American Veterans, then elaborated on his program later In nn inter- view. Three Killed In Riots In Santiago Santiago, Chile Three norm were killed In riots that th rough downtown Santiago Wednesday and Wednesday nifht the cabinet announced it was ask- ing extraordinary powers from Congress to put down a "revolu- tionary plot" inspired by Commu- nists and other oppoultion The by Radio Star Arthur Godfrey and Zkkne Rickenbacker, the American avia- tion from pre- tests over an increase in bus amounting to 20 cer.tavoi (about three Emergency Meeting President Gabriel Gonzales Videla rushed to Santiago from his sum- mer residence at Vina. Mar to preside over an jaeet- ing 'of the cabinet. He is recover- ing from tonsil operation. In addition to the three dead the government hospital reported 31 persons wounded, four seriously. Three suffered gunshot wounds. The others were hurt by bricks and flying gloss from broken win- dows. Police fired above the of the mobs, but said in many eases they used blank cartridges. Red Agitators The government blamed the demonstrations on Communist agi- tators. Living costs have sharply In Chile recently and there were shouts against price from the crowds. (See RIOTS, Page 12) Bankers Will Hold Meeting In Kingsport Some 300 bankers will be in Kingsport October II for a day- long meeting of Group I of the Tennessee Bankers Association, ac- cording to W. B. Holbach, secre- tary of the group. Plans' for the meeting were nude Tuesday when H. G. Huddleston, executive secretary of the associa- tion, conferred in Kingsport with Clyde Crafts, president of the Sul- livan County Bank; C. C. Hamlett, cashier of First National Bank in Kingsport; Frank Gardner, presi- dent of the Citizens Bank in Rog- ersville; and Halbacb. There are eight groups in the Tennessee Ban kern Association. Group I is the largest, consisting of 12 JJpper East Tennessee counties; The October meeting will mark the first time since 1939 that the group has met in Kingsport. Speakers for the conference have not been chosen, according to Hal- bach. Solunar Tables By JOHN ALDEN KNIGHT The schedule of Solunar as printed below, has been taken from John Aiden Knight's Solunar Tables. Plan your days so that will be fishing in good territory or hunting in good cover during UMM times, it you wisb to find the sport that each day has to offer. The Major Periods are shown in boldface type. These begin at tbe times shown and last for an boar and a half or two hours thereafter Tbe Minor Periods, shown in regu- lar type, of somewhat shortP- duration Cse Eastern Standard AJM. PJNL Da; Minor Major Minor I Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday fM Lake Stages The observed stage on Cherokee Reservoir at 6 a.m. was 1066.8 feet above mean sea level and it will fall 0.1 foot by midnight Thursday. The observed stage on Douglas Reservoir at a.m. on Wednesday was 984.1 feet above mrnn sea level and it will fall 0.6 foot by midnight Thursday,   

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