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Kingsport News: Thursday, October 15, 1942 - Page 1

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   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - October 15, 1942, Kingsport, Tennessee                             PAPER YOU WILL FIND DAILY ASSOCIATED PRESS WIREPHOTOS AND THE WORLDWIDE NEWS OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, WIDE WORLD NEWS, NEA, AMERICAN NEWSPAPER ALLIANCE, AND CHICAGO TRIBUNE-NEW YORK NEWS FEATURES. NO OTHER NEWSPAPER IN THIS AREA HAS ALL THESE. KINGSPORT NEWS 'Tie Paper With The Pictures" KINGSPORT, TENN., THURS., OCT. 15, 1942 12 PAGES. 5 CENTS Stocks Stock leaders drop. Few specialties close slightly higher. shares sold. Issues strong bat Josses arc numerous. REINFO Numbered Graves In A Potter's Field sir inpnt'nfcrt wooden tombstones, bearing only numbers, are said by the Washington Evening narl; the arares in a District, of Columbia potter's field of the six Nazi saboteurs who were clec.- rvz'.'.l in Washington August 8 after trial by a special military commission. The Star said the bodies ite'.t in Walter Reed Hospital for some time after the executions but no relatives nor friends ever claimed them. tigger Army Requested Ptrv.rc.. !orr-5 n' i-Kh. fr. Ifr As .1 11 Army plans to build a hard-striking force of at t least men in 3943 were disclosed Wednesday by Secretary j of War Stimson and General George ;C. Marshall as the reason for lowering the draft age i on. but .from 20 to 18 years immediately. I .r- ..-in moderate tern-1 Simultaneously, they revealed to n n 'levying action to full impact of the More Moderate Weather Seen i'.'s a losing battle i'oth time and Ivr. iy. whose reading H'i n hnv of 54. to 24 hours air of nntici- became Congress that this ration already i has 4.250.000 men in the Army 3.250.000 less than the minimum requirements by the end of next. year. i Croats Rebel Against Group Favoring Nazis Bern, -Followers of Dr. Vladimir Mr.cek, Croa'.ian peasant leader, have revolted Achievement of the 7.5PO.OOO goal'against the government of Dr. Ante would mean that Uncle Sam would Pavelic and fighting is now rac-in" have at the end of 1043 an Army almost twice the size of the c.sU- ln the state of uniform at Yugoslav circles said 'Invasion' Delay Hit By Willkie Sticks To Stand After Conference With Roosevelt Back from his globe-girdling tour Wendell L. Will- kie conferred with President Roose- velt Wednesday night and emerged from the White House still sticking to his stand that there had been needless delay in opening a second front. 1 Although he said that in his judg- ment "Germany will never conquer he hammered away again at the second front theme in a session with reporters. i Asked whether he thought there had been "needless he said that WHS the conclusion that might be drawn from what he said at Moscow and what he was saying tonight. 1 Made Long Trip Clad in a batFered hat and a blue suit plainly showing the ef- fects of his journey, Willkie announced in a formal statement that he would now devote himself to "making careful, crystal- clear reports to the American peo- ple." i "How long that will take I don't I he continued. "I do know- because I have found out at first a lot of us. including public officials, are going to have to stretch our muscles and our minds before we win." He said he based his appeal for a, second front on an analysis of the recommendations of military lead-' ers of Britain, Russia, China andi tb.e. United States. .And he told re-i jporterK'--he had considerable expe-j rience in judging recommendations j of technical experts. i Has Own Ideas j He had his own ideas where a' second front should be opened, he I said, but he kept it to himself. i j The man who opposed President! I Roosevelt in the 1940 elections, as- jthe Republican party's presidential 'nominee, circled the world in 50 days as the chief executive's per- jsor.a! representative. He visited the: middle east. Russia and China, ar-! i riving in Washington in the late j 'afternoon. Then, for an hour and i a half, he save what he described j as very frank observations and; I conclusions to the President. He j would not say specifically what he; 'had reported and he preferred that Mr. Roosevelt say whether the .President was satisfied with his: fission and with his report. y- Solomon Battle Looms Rift Between Nazis, Italy Said Widening Workers Give Cripple A jew weeks ago 10-year-old Lorene Mitchell frjght.) of Los Angeles sponsored The launching of a Liberty her happiness U'as great. But that was just the beginning of her good fortune. Work- ers, Kho liuilt the ship, contributed to pay tu'o eminent sur- geons to operate on her crippled leg. And so Hie doctors are going to operate Oct. 17 in hopes that they can make the leg strong and straight again. With the little girl is her mother. Washington JP The Japa- nese landed heavy reinforcements or, Guadalcanal Island in the Solo- mons early Wednesday, and indica- tions tonight were that a major battle was impending, if not ac- tually begun, between the strength- ening enemy and the Marines spearheading the American offen- sive in the southwest Pacific. Announcement of the enemy landings was made by the Navy London -PP- -Reports of a widen- tonight in a special ing rift between Germany and Italy communique based on reports re- jcame from neutral European capi'- UP to P-m- Eastern War Itals Wednesday as Hitler's gestapo Time. chief visited Rome and! Airfield Bombed conferred at length with Musso-. iffiaa i; As a possible clue to the on the strategic of discussion between Heinrich Island hefore the land' Himmler and II Duce, reports which filtered out of the Axis esc bold were car- Mussies Advance tere out of the Axis camp in- dicated stronglv that Germany has ned successful. y by the deter- grown increasingly suspicions of enem-v, desplte fact that her junior partner's attitude toward only Iast a s- cruiser- the United Stages destroyer task force had repelled a Reported amor.g the tinders attempt and smashed eight the flames of this distrust Jap shlps Marines hnd fought were: forwarrl to advanced positions on j 1: Italy's permission for th- !ind- the lhc Northernmost sec- ing of Myron C. Taylor's plane in tion of the island where the enemy jRome. facilitating trie recent visit are concentrated. by President Roosevelt's special en- Tne latest landings were made voy to the Vatican for talks with tne roast of this same section. the Pope; Whether they were opposed by 2: U. S. Attorney General Francis u- s- Navy and Marine air- Biddle's announcement that after craft s'ationed on Guadalcanal was Oct. 19 the 600.000 Italians in theinot stated in the communique. i United States no longer would .be 'Neither was there any mention of 'under restrictions BS enemy aliens. the Japanese surface vessels hav. Dropped In Italy ing been engaged by Ani-rii-art Biddle disclosed in Washington ships during their bombardment. that copies of his Columbus bay: Serious Grand Jury To Be Asked To Probe Death General MacArthur's Headquar- ters, Heavier fight- jing has developed in the Owen Presumably the translated copies no'-'r-wd' Almost mv.-inably m the the speech were being dropped pn? by British or American planes op- erating over Italian territory :Stanley mountains, where Australi- Mediterranean bases. Jan troops are engaged in driving. The Berlin radio announced that itoward the north shore of New iHimmler "is in Rome for a private ,'visit as a guest of the Italian gov- activities in the Solomons have not been disclosed until at least two or three da vs. after they rom occurred. Moreover, the Japanese activities tached to their movements in the lernment." Later it broadcast a- !DNB dispatch from Rome that southwest Pacific archipelago. So far as has been announced mated men Woman Accused Of Killing Male Guinea, an Allied communique said j Thursday. The increased scale of the action Himmler "has been leceived by II !amid the iurele-covered Beaks Dllce- with horn he had a the-v have not heretofore succeeded A Sullivan County Grand Jurv: .and cordial conference." in actually bombarding the airfield will be asked to investigate accompanled; The currency of reports of main installations ir. th8 s by air attacks in the Waiopi area.'strained relations between Berlin American portion of the island, al- death of Byron Greer, who was shot .behind the Japanese front Rome, however, that it was though there have been sporadic to death in Tranbarger Hollow and against Lae. an enemy shore more likelv that Mussolin was on attempts to do so by submarines Saturday night, after Magistrate base on New Guinea some 150 miles the carpet' before the man whose'and occasional destroyers. P. H. Spivey bound Otto P. Meyers the SCePe of is charged with keeping j Troops landed to circuit court Wednesday after the principal fighting. thn weather- :the end of World War I. ui: irny 'rrT..- Hri'lfy. sr.l s cor.rerned krpt for thc wo-.ilil hurst into ''I in brilliant yellows, and I Wednesday. An army of about peasants Xeod Young Men Both Stimson and Marshall, the'was said to be attacking the khaki- Army chief of staff, said the Army I uniformed Ustachi, the militia had too many older men. who i The latter took place, the com- :noon on a murder charge and set munique said, in the vicinity of his bond at 'Templeton's Crossing, marking a The state, which accuses Greer further advance bv General Mac- Glover. 24. charged with first'of murder in the first degree murder of her husband, placed 10 witnesses Pulaski, Mrs. America would find it hard to stand the Pavclic developed from the Dave Glover, 49, was in the Giles j during the hearin County jail Wednesday night in j Hammonds, a taxi eem in store weather for on MEDITATIONS of modern war. and Marshall -handful of Fascist-inclined Croat- i rDVca'cd t'na' he was studying theiians whom he trained while in __ of sending numbers of exile in Italy these men home when younger sol-, Thcy nrc fighting independently diers are available. of thc forcrs which Gcr. The days testimony before Sen- cra] Draia has b-en ate and House Military Committees leading in the Yugoslav mountains also brought a disclosure that thc of the Y ficials hope to put off the drafting siav nmv in Apri, ]941 of married men with children until' Yugoslav circles 'here said 46 the last quarter of 1943 provided werc derailecl in Croatia draft age is lowered to include 18 troops, on the stand; ig, including Earl' i rab driver. Mrs. lieu of Sl.OOO which was set at Winnie Wampler. a store keeper preliminary hearing earlier today I Copas. a neighbor of Meyers and the dead man, J. B. Weaver. employe of Hamlett-Dobson Funeral another Italy toeing the mark. Woman Convicted For Burning Girls IM DEY CAUS EP FI6HTUH5.1.'" before Magistrate Amos Richard' son, Mrs. Glover was bound over to Home. Mrs. Rosa the next term of circuit court. neighbor. i Meyers Narkeis Ai A Glance advance and 'ing the month of September ,-indj ithat German troops now are guard-' I ing the entire length of the Zagr.-b- ishooting o Greer in the Meve then lose most of gain at clow, 'home Saturdav ofrire-s werp' Cattle steady to higher. Sheep i told that Greer had Veen shot when and 19 year olds. "Do It Xmv" Among the witnesses was Ad-jBo, dc rai1road. imiral Ernest J. King, commander-! ._____________ .in-chief of-fhe fleet, who urged the lower draft'age in these words: "Do it it all at once, and not in bites, saying 'We'll take those 19 now and those 18 later on.1" Although the Navy now is getting its men by voluntary enlistments. he said, it would have the same problems as the Army if and when it had to turn to the selective service system for its recruits. higher. chance in prices. Produce Poultry firm and irregular. Another fact which the com-, munique made clear was that the 'troops landed Wednesday morning from transports covered by naval units which undoubtedly I meant the Japanese got not only imen but also artillery and sup- Atlanta- Elizabeth Arm- plies ashore. Lnck of artillery is strong, matron of the Atlanta Com- reported to have been one of their, unity Home for Girls, was convicted main weaknesses, in Fulton County Superior Court i Some previous landings had been Wednesday on charges that she; made from transports, frequently ;burned two young girls with Against American aerial opposi- Sommerville, Tenn. as punishment for smok- tion. But most of the men sent trainman was missing Wednesday'ing. inshore by the enemy in the two knight as flares and smoke still; Judge Virlyn B. Moore witheld I months since the Marines invaded skyward from the spot Sentence until Thursday. the Solomons had been landed in On investigation of the near where two freight trains col-! Mrs. Armstrong, tried on charges: small groups from barges and Sll'L" -lided head-on this morning, in-, of assault and battery, denied the ;simiiar light craft. juring eight crewmen. :charge. She said she "did not or; -ir -tr The missing man was identified; never had burned or whipped any-; Trainman Missing After Collision placed no witnesses on the stand in the hearing, nor did ;he take the stand himself. Divorce Granted Los Angeles JP Film Actor Dick Purcell was granted a divorce Wednesday from Ethelind Terry of the screen after testifying he never knew when she was posing land when" sincere. He told Judge i Goodwin J. Knight she threw a 'pot of hot coffee at him. missed ;and broke a mirror. They were .married in Las Vegas, Nev., last I March 3. A Ship Sinks... a Battle Is Lost... (An Editorial) Somewhere a mother, a wife, a child weeps. A shin had gone down. T'nprotpcted by convoy, the ship shuddered and sank quickly as the torpedo crashed into its side. Down in the engine rooms the son, the husband, the father didn't have a chance. Somewhere a man sobs. His little girl is dead. Bombers roared overhead and dropped their explosives. The man heard his daughter's screams when the heavy timber and mortar fell. in tMnk8- bBrbed wire Md They had come suddenly in men whose leaders told them they were chosen liy God. The soldier's bullets were gone when still more little men came. The soldier thinks and wonders. aml if you havp an-v iro" soil ,t IMMEDIATELY to a junk dealer or donate it to some chanty. a shot gun went off accidently while in the hands of Jack Meyer. !seven-year-old son of the accused I man. However, a coroner's jury, after an inquest held early Sunday morning, reported that Greer had "met death by foul means." Greer's body was found by offi- cers lying in the front- door of the Meyers home. Washington sub- _as Leon Jordan of Bruceton, Tenn.; one at the girls' home or any other marines operating in Japanese 'The injuries of the eight were re- place." The accusation against Dominated waters of 'the'western said, was "a Pacific, have sunk an enemy heavy cruiser and four other vessels and I damaged three more, one of which 'probably sank, the Navy reported j Wednesday. i Disclosure Driver Freed In Death Case Russians Welcome Chilly Weather And Hold Germans Moscow The Red army, fighting in the welcome chiil of an approaching winter, repulsed several more tank-supported man attacks in the Stalingrad I and Caucasian areas Wednesday without yielding ground, the So- Accommac, Colt- j viet command announced early rain, charged with manslaughter as Thursday. the result of an accident that! For the second straight day the claimed the. lives of five women I communique reported no signifi- from Parksley. was acquitted; cant change in the general situa- Wednesday in circuit court here! before Judge Jeff F. Walter. Coltrain. truck driver for a Nor- folk concern, was involved in an accident with a bus carrying em- ployees of a freezing plant on July 20 at Keller. tion. The German shock troops apparently were in a state of tem- porary exhaustion or were holding -back for replinishment or to switch to another theater. Two companies of Nazis were reported to have been killed, and five German guns, seven machine- gun positions, and three dugouts destroyed by one Soviet unit op- erating inside the ruined city where the enemy's attacks have noticeably faltered within the last week. Northwest of the citj' only "bat- tles of local importance" occured, with the Russians fending off an attack by two infantry companies which lost 100 men, the communi- que said. Nazi prisoners also were taken in this area where one dis- patch said the Red army had dis- lodged the enemy from hilltops which had dominated Russian supply roads. of the undersea suc- cesses raised the total of enemy ship casualties officially announced in two days to 38. of which 11 (See SOLOMOX on Page 3> Good Morning A Little Chuckle To Start the Day San Parrish of Dayton. Ohio, copied the uni- form correctly, but he muffed thc manners. 1'arrish, 31, was jailed for un- lawfully wearing military dreflg. FBI Agent Harold Nathan said the disguise might not have been detected Parrish saluted enlisted men before they saluted him. Bonds To Hasten Victory! (This Slogan won for Miss Claudia Burke, Route No. 2, Nicklesville, Va. The Kingsport News pays for every slogan published. Mail yours   

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