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   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - October 13, 1942, Kingsport, Tennessee                             PAPER YOU WILL FIND DAILY ASSOCIATED PRESS WIREPHOTOS AND THE WORLDWIDE NEWS OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, WIDE WORLD NEWS, AMERICAN NEWSPAPER ALLIANCE. AND CHICAGO TRIBUNE-NEW YORK NEWS FEATURES. NO OTHER NEWSPAPER IN THIS AREA HAS ALL THESE ffealher light hat colder in cen- light rain, temperature. KINGSPORT NEWS 'Tie Paper With The Pictures' VOL. I. NO. 86. KINGSPORT, TENN.. TUES., OCT. 13, 1942 SPACES. SCENTS. Slocks Principal financial and commod- ity markets closed Monday in ob- scrvance of Columbus Day. Canadian securities and grain ex- changes also were closed because it was Thanksgiving Day for Ca- nadians. OR URGES DRAFT AG lians U.S. iel Break Biddle Declares Aliens Not To Be Classed 'Enemies' Youngest Tork anrlounced Benjamin Franklin Allen of An- Sw effective Oc-; derson County is Tennessee's Italian aliens would no youngest surviving veteran of the ,i: be classed as alien confederate Army, now receiving aue, he said, npnvinn HP. is .9.? find Willkie's World Tour Germans Renew Japs Sink Fight With Reds Is Near End At Stalingrad reli earned will be granted Tiiidwa not mean that danger-. lcr disloyal persons are no long- rbisct to apprehension or in-: the attorney general. Jit'a Columbus Day address at Hall. "We still will take 'thatcn. It docs mean that the pittou applying, up to now, to c Ksafes. no longer apply to Hi aliens, x x x they will be free ja-icipate in the war effort.: lisa: the handicaps that have j them up to now." He is 93 and still active. Lands In Alaska On Way Back To United States Edmonton, Moscow (AP) Fighting broke out anew inside the city of Stalingrad Monday after a lull of several days, the Russians announced in their midnight communique Tues- day. Nazi troops gained slightly in one block of the ruined city. "A regiment of enemy troops supported by 50 tanks three Three U. S. Cruisers Worships Lost In Opening Fight In Solomon Area Willkie, arriving here Monday 6 .muiiuojr tlmcs attacked our night from Fairbanks, Alaska, on communique said of the Stalingrad! th a closing leg of his globe-girdling fight. "All the attacks were beaten flight, said he thought it inappro- priate while abroad to reply "to off. Only in one block our detach- Iurther Progress there, the Russians Washington The loss ofi three heavy American cruisers in j ----------------------1a fierce, night-time naval battle] not rcaking any-fought during the initial phase of, the attack on the Solomon Islands! ments were somewhat pressed back said. The midnight communique wag announced Monday by the, _ by the enemy. isaid a counter-attacking Red army Covering the landing of remforce- fhppant statements made by cer- j -As a resujt of thls fighting 20. "on a number of sectors made some j ments in the Tulagi-Guadalcanal tain public officials concerning were disabled or set on in the Mozdok region area, the second night of the attack II FT Uf I) U (expression of my opinion in Russia I and about two battalions of Ger-j which protects the Gronzy oil fields Jon the islands, the cruisers Quincy, Jiff li HIlIlDf on the question of a second front man wiPed out" or 50 miles to the east. Vincennes and Astoria were out- The momentary lull in the costly i The twin German Caucasian ef- lined in the glare of enemy search- Tr> Q ot-noTif coirl- __ ..I _ Arnold; Peace Offered To CIO In a prepared statement he said: Nazi effort to reduce the Volga; fort to crawl farther down theljights and star shells and werej "I felt it my duty while abroad City had led to the belief that the Black Sea coast southeast of No- sunk by a Japanese force of cruisers I 'to uphold the hand of the Presi- i Germans intended to try to break vorossisk also was being and destroyers. dent and all other United Nations'througn to tne CasPian sea in the i the communique said. A Soviet unit: In the same action, the night of; Mozdok area of the operating in that area I August 8-9, the Australian cruiser- officials, which I continued to do. far to tne south Stalingrad. i counter-attacked the enemy an-i Canberra was hit by shells and even after such remarks were! If that is the German killed about 200 it said, torpedoes, heavily damaged and set Toronto, American made." Probe Made Federation of Labor asked Monday for an investigation of Thurman Willkie said he would leave; Tuesday morning for Minneapolis.' Willkie's statement in Russia, i BAiaid that his office had in- Arnoid, u. S. anti-trust chief, to, jbpts thoroughly all Italians in determine whether he has used the urging speed in opening a second mtioain an "unprecedented ex- prestige of his JOD for personal d tht oerhaDS the dKo! wartime v.gilancc." material gain, signalled a fresh at- and ,safngr the fa. find that cut of a total of uponBthe Nastional Labor Reia. military leaders needed prodding IWpcsons. there has beer, cause Uons Board- and offered an the public, resulted in wide- on 228. or fewer than one- mediate armistice to the CIO pend- I spread repercussions in the United l of one he said. negotiations for full reunion, i Nations, (laid that he had recom-; The resolutions committee, head-; President Roosevelt, replying to also enactment of a bill in by vice chajrman Matthew j questions, said in Washington that Pastors Are Appointed l which would grant to an sierwise eligible, citizen- rihout taking the literacy rided he is 50 years old or j car.d provide'! he came to the Stsies before July 1, 1924, i (ias lived in the country con-' uraly since. Woll, brought in reports on the three subjects which, the conven- tion adopted by a voice vote with- out dissent. Arnold Hit Italians Aided The 'labor he had read the headlines on the! Moscow dispatches had not considered it worthwhile to read Willkie's statement since he con- sidered it speculation. Willkie's statement tonight did not indicate which comments on his 1 1J t- J J 1MUH-C1.LG 1111-11 ..111-11 Ull JJ1< report on Arnold heided remarks he "flippant." and the anti-trust j-enor oj Willkie's prepares i concurred in and supplemented the statement indicated that the matter Jeifers Defies Cotton Senators To Block Plans afire. Abandoned during the night, she sank the morning of August 9, as already announced by the Aus- tralian government. Many Lives Lost Although a majority of the crews i of the three cruisers was saved, a' j Navy communique reported, thej T, 1 loss of life was heavy, and the com-: Knoxville JP The Holstoni ander the Quincy, Capt. Sam-. [Methodist Conference closed its'uel N. Moore, of Alexandria, Va., j 119th annual session Monday by'was one of those lost. Capt. F. L. assigning 140 pastors and supply posts within -the Southwest Virginia and East Ten- nessee jurisdiction for the next year. The only change in superintend- ents within the ten districts was i at Tazewell, Va., B. T. Sells, pas- 'Riefkohl, of Maunabo, Puerto Rico, Jcommanding- the Vincennes, and Capt. William G. Greenman, of Watertown, N. Y., skipper of the Astoria, were saved. Breathing de- tor of Grove Avenue Church, Rad- Two Escape Rationing Manpower Is Asked President Seeks Way To Shorten World Conflict By Richard L. Turner Washington JP President Roosevelt, asserting that Allied strength was "on the upgrade" and the enemy growing nervous, Mon- day urged the drafting of IS and 19-year-olds so that an army with the spirit and hardihood of youth! I may shorten the war with anni- jhilating new offensives. At the same time, the President called for the rationing of man- power. Workers must be kept from changing jobs at will, he said. Pirating of one employer's labor ,by another must be forbidden. The objective must be "the right num- i bers of people in the right places at the right time." Ar.d he held out a possibility that [legislation of a drastic nature may be necessary to keep the farmer supplied with hands to harvest the nation's food supplies. The Amer- ican people, he added, will not "shrink" from such action, should it become necessary. FDR Optimistic The President was delivering his second radio report to the nation iin five weeks. It was, generally i speaking, an optimistic report of Iwhat he found on his recent tour of defense plants, army pests and naval stations. Already, he said, is' getting "ahead of tha From the Stateville penitentiary enemy in the battles of trans- at JoV.et, III, these two men The action began about a.m., escaped Oct. 9, to become the ford, Va., becoming superintendent. portation and production. In addition there was another ________ hint at second front plans. The August 9, as transports and supply j object of widespread police search, officers of the general staff, ha ships were pouring reinforcements; They are Roger Touhy said, were in general agreement ashore for the Marines who had occupied the Tulagi-Guadalcar.al notorious yangsier who ivas sen- area of the Solomons in a surprise attack August 7. t other resppcts. have made this committee said, "flatly repudiated' their n'.vn." Bidrile said. Arnold's "attempted distortions of; Italians would.be af- law." ctt by this new law." The best known of Arnold's suits j ra attorney general said that was the Hutcheson case, which; rraovir.g the lahr-1 of alien en- g-ew out of a strike by the AFL; J (ram Italians "we do not for-; Carpenters Union. The court de-. :tiat there arc other loyal per-1 cjded Arnold had no anti-trust case classed as alien enemies." because he failed to show collusion: Tlnr situation is now being: with a second employer. Wily and sympathetically stud-, Aftcr tnat decision, said the com- _t7 the Department of mjttee, organized labor believed; Arnold's "uncalled for eruption had added. Johnson City's Bus, Rail Travel To Be Surveyed ing a 99-year term for the 000 kidnaping of John fJakc. the nemy planes dropped flares over j Barber) Factor in 1933 and Basil Banghart, Touhys Changed cruisers and destroyers skirted gangster lieutenant who was aiso stop him from substituting rayon The gweetwater Tenn. district I south coast of Savo Island, between! serving lor the same kidnaping. for cotton in heavy duty tires the largest turnover, Tulagi and Guadalcanal, headed for other dangerous crim- the Army wanted rayon. 125 pastorates being affected by the the supply ships. "I'm not going to put myself in 1942 assignments. a position where it is said of me j Complete changes announced by that I lack the intelligence and the conference, with present pas guts to do a the former presi- tors or l dent of the Union Pacific railroad theses where available, Pastors m paren- It atto "Sick Of Hitler" told the Senate Agriculture Com- mittee. "To many haven't done their job because they were afraid of some irr.ry been effectively and authoritatively B. East-! committee on pressure group. I'm -.oral said that j quieted." Instead, the report added.: man, director of the Office of De-1 not going to work on that basis." 'Jfople of Italy today were sick events proved Arnold was far more ......11. sick of Mussolini, and interested in the impression he of Adolf Hitler." i made upon the press than upon the The revolt ngainst Italian supreme court. a, cannot bo kept down." he "i; has already started. Here fense Transportation, asked Monday, "Talks Back" Delegates Cheerful Vnited State's, in American The delegates whooped and clap- 1 The survey, to be conducted by ped again when Daniel J. Tobin, for cooperation of the public in a; I( was the first dme s survey of intercity rai and bus th t government official had ...UinV, i talked back in such strong language to a committee which had called him on the carpet. travel which the ODT will make in 101 cities, beginning Wednesday, October 21. the Census Bureau, to obtain a picture of passenger trav- el under war conditions and is simi- lar to one conducted last May. At one growled at Johnson City district: Chuckey Circuit. John K. Dean (J. F. Church Hill Circuit, David Denton 
                            

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