Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Kingsport News Newspaper Archive: October 08, 1942 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Kingsport News

Location: Kingsport, Tennessee

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - October 8, 1942, Kingsport, Tennessee                             PAPER YOU WILL FIND DAILY ASSOCIATED PRESS WIREPHOTOS AND THE WORLDWIDE NEWS OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, WIDE WORLD NEWS, NEA, AMERICAN NEWSPAPER ALLIANCE. AND CHICAGO TRIBUNE-NEW YORK NEWS FEATURES. NO OTHER NEWSPAPER IN THI9 AREA HAS ALL THESE. feather warmer. KING SPORT NEWS "Tie Paper With The Pictures' VOL. I. NO. 82. KINGSPORT, TENN., THUR., OCT. 8, 1942 10 PAGES. SCENTS Stocks Stock buying rush shares higher. shares sold. run of hesitant and main trend trifle Irregular. APPEAR WEAKENING OMW Votes To Leave CIO Ranks Move Comes After lewis Had Asked for Withdrawal jtcinnati. O.-P-The United Workers of America late Krfnesday voted almost unani- withdraw from the Con- HJJ V Industrial Organizations 3 "j-jpltte a two-year, steadily r't-JX breach. joh- L UMW chieftain wfo-oe: CIO president, virtually 4 mir.ers in a 56-minute j Good Morning ao. Six Named To Assist J. F. Byrnes List Completed As Leader Takes Oath of Office thfe ap- pointment of two representatives each from labor, agriculture and j management, President Roosevelt completed Wednesday the member- ship of a board which will assist James F. Byrnes in controlling the wartime economy of the nation. Byrnes announced the appoint- ments at a White House press con- ference. Immediately afterward he took the oath of office as director of economic stabilization. With a salary of a fourth less than fe askfl delegates to vote after rejecting, 75 to 9, a proposaljhe made as an associate 'justice of r gupreme Byrneg wH, draw as much pay as a cabinet member. He is expected to sit in onj decide between him and A Little Chuckle To Start the Day New York George T. Howe, Jr., 31, and hid 43-year-old father were inducted into the Army together Wednesday with the son remarking: "Pop and -I ought to make a good team. Gee, what U I get to be pop's "We're tickled to death to go." Said' George T. Howe. 68, who lives with his son arid grandson: "I wish I were a little younger join the Navy" Senate Rejects Plan To Boost Tax On Firms Washington By an over- whelming vote, the Senate Wednes- day approved a 40 per cent tax on sh speakers, previous corporation incomes above jia: the split, only a scattering by Senator LaFollette ij M stood af'.c-r the majority to increase that rate to (P-Wis) to 50 per cent. sheeted their approval of Then, in a day of rapid action, L-ro stand. it voted to reduce the credit for de- Lwis' Kequpst pendent children and others from 1 think this convention in to and turned to a. dis- 'jiuelf and in honor to its officers icussion of the problem of taxing lini! adopt this report from state and municipal at on report which rec- securities historically exempt from Lewis de- _ii.ending the debate. do rot adopt this report, yc'j cio rot want a man like your president. You want a I as TC: more rabbit in him than I he added to set off a I demonstration in Mu- roport said "We I in amend the officials for Itx-fcthright analysis of the ef- IfeUfthe prevailing attitude of Itatcfficersof the CIO as not being locKKctive nor in the best interest believes that kers of Amer- labor. "In: committee sert Mine Wo federal assessments. Both votes on corporation rates found the Senate following the ad- vice of its finance committee and disregarding the recommendations of the Treasury- The latter had rec- ommended a rate of per cent on corporation incomes over By comparison, the House approved a rate of 45 per cent. The rates cited consisted of a normal tax of 24 per cent (un- changed from the present law) plus surtaxes, but not including a 90 per cent tax on excess profits. Detail Nazis Try Reign Of Terror Plan To 'Tame 'Norway London (AP) Adolf Hitler's executioners took the lives of 5 more persons Wednesday at Trondheim, Norway, the Oslo radio announced, as Nazi administrators bore down with a reign of terror in ruthless determination to mold the country into "new order" subservience. Along with 10 lawyers, editors, a shipowner and other Red Army Continues Big Drive Russians Advance At One Point, Hold Nazis at Another Red army con- itinued its drive against the Ger- cuted Tuesday, the total thus far ing a general strike m protest ank northwest-of Stalin- was brought to 25 as the result of.against annexation of their state of emergency imposed upon'country to the Reich and mobiliza-igrad Wednesday and held all po-, rondheim and a coastal strip ofjtion of their youth. About 19 exe-jSitions inside the battle-scarred I prominent citizens who were the huge mass of men tanks the Germans have 400 miies'." jcutions are known, he said. Many'cjty Two others Wednesday were sen- j deportations are taking place, wMJfone of checkup of everyone thrown into the battle, the Soviet, a court martial was acquitted, the j living in the area of the of; midnight communique said Thurs-j radio said. All were charged vague- ly with "criminal offenses." The "criminal it was specified in a later announcement, consisted of sabotage and transpor- tation of arms. (At the same time the Luxem- cabinet meetings. ilbourg commissioner of information ame lin New York. announced that many These were the additions to the Luxembourgers hac I been .hot by Six Vamed economic stabilization board: Labor representatives, William Green, president of- the American Federation of Labor, and Phillip Murray, president of the CIO. Farm representatives, President James G. Patton, of the Farmers'; Cooperative Union, and Edward i O'Neal, president, American Farm Bureau Federation. Representing management, Eric A. Johnston, president of the Cham- the Germans between Sept. 3 and 7 at Wiltz, Differdange, Schifflange, emergency was started by the tapo which broadcast orders for reports said Marshal persons normally living in the dis-: Timosnenko's relief offensive north- trict but now residing elsewhere toiwest of had ripped into register at the nearest police sta- tion immediately. "They seem to have come down and haphazardly picked out prom- inent citizens and shot them as a form of intimidation of the popu- said the Norwegian tele- graph agency here in commenting Echternach and Ettebruck follow- on the first 10 executed. her of States, Commerce of the United and Ralph E. Flanders, president, Jones Machine Company, Springfield, yt. In an executive order putting into effect the new anti-inflation law, Mr. Roosevelt had already placed ion the board the secretaries of the Nelson Declares Americans Responding To Scrap Drive a line of hundreds of Nazi "tank forts" and overrun a stronghold, wiping out Rumanian troops. The communique's reference to this action said simply that "north- west of Stalingrad our troops have been conducting operations for the improvement of their positions." Battle Rages Inside the rubbl'o-strewn city, the battle raged fiercely, but the Soviet communique indicated the Red Army had not withdrawn at any point. "All attacks'of'enemy tanks and infantry have been repelled with heavy it said. "Our troops j Hero Lieut. Charles Paine 27- year-old Army jlier from Way- cross, Ca., brought a. U. S. Flying Fortress, battered but intact, back England alter 40 German lighter planes attacked his big ship h'gli over France and in- flicted the following damage: Put two motors out of commission, riddled the fortress' rudder, sta- bilizer and a wing; shot away half of the controls, and smashed the landing gear. One member of the crew was wounded. In committee proposed Treasury, agriculture, commerce t! the CIO. or any one of the af- fed units while furthering a opposition to the surtax rate of 10 per cent on porate net incomes of not more than and 16 per cent on net incomes in excess of AmeriCa "notch" provision would be estab- %J: committee, therefore, rec-i'ished Providing for gradual trans- to this convention ,from the to Worknrs nf for corporations with incomes ,.thri m" !between and withdraw from, House before the Senate voted to make these rates effective in totality, instead of by brackets. This would cause a cor- poration with more than net returns to pay the 16 per cent sur- tax on all of its earnings, instead of paying only 10 per cent on the first of those earnings. LaFollette's proposal was 10 per cent on the first and 26 per cent on all over that amount. He contended that such rates would in- crease the Treasury's revenues by without "undue sacri- tor, price administrator, and War Labor Board chairman. One Of First Acts One of the director's first acts after taking his oath was to direct Secretary of Agriculture Wickard, and direct its subordinate and members to withdraw any official participation in affairs, or affiliation with any S! of the CIO, until such time -'tit CIO sees fit to correct its desist from its policy of and antagonistic at- -Ki: ih ir.j ;'j toward the United Mine of America and recognize Ir.t ir.i financi.i! obligations." officers' report the CIO with owing it in negotiated loans, re- -ttt ir, the U.MWs refusal since 'Prir.K to pay a pcrcapita tax If ice'" CIO. Harkeis Ai A Glance .Uwstock-Hnirs advance for lirst JWmwrek. Gains run from 15 to ttnU. .tlins-Cnrn clrdinos while other old steady. l'nultry (New York) Ir- r and wnh. Rutler and eggs French Workers Warned To Quit FDR Indicates Hitler to Face Trial Alter War chairman of.. I Wednesday night said the American people were responding admirably to the current drive to collect metal scrap and urged pa- I officially; 'the Russians''billed about 500 Germans and destroyed 19 tanks. (In London the British news agency Reuters quoted an Italian report as saying Russian Kiska Still In Hands Of Enemy Japanese Are Missing on Two Other Islands (By The Associated Press) Japanese withdrawal from their two westernmost bases in the Aleu- and im- plied Wednesday night by a U. S. Navy announcement which said there was no sign of enemy life among the bomb-wrecked installa- tions on the two islands. It was the most significant news in weeks from this North Pacific front and it evidently was a direct consequence of the U. S. counter- offensive which has moved U. S; bases within easy fighter range of all the enemy footholds, especially the remaining Japanese garrison on Kiska Island. (See pictures on Page 10 showing how the United States is preparing to knock the Japanese out of the Aleutians.) Japs Hit The navy communique which re- vealed the absence of the enemy at Attu and Agattu disclosed, more- over, that the latest raids on Kiska by enemy liberators and fighters had resulted in direct hits on the seaplane hangar there. Six Jap sea- planes were shot down in the air, many fire and demolition bombs landed in the Japanese camp area, and all the raiders returned safely. Kiska is some 200 miles east of Attu, westernmost Aleutian' Island. .Apparently. the--enein'y; irioved out. j tience with local boards and col-1 forces attacking the German flank lectors in getting the material to thrown pon- processing channels. Washington trial of Adolf A post-war Hitler for high "Reports from all sections of the Nelson said in a state- ment, "indicate that patriotic crimes against humanity was ap-j Americans are responding admir- toon bridges across the Don and sent troops to the west bank of that stream.) In the Mozdok area, in the Cau- casus, the Russians retired to new positions at one point after a fierce engagement. At another point, the .parently foreshadowed Wednesday ably to the appeal by the news- communique said, 12 German tanks who had recommended the step, whcn Presidcnt ROOSevelt said the papers to give scrap metal im-'.managed to penetrate to the rear of to maintain the loan rate on tne t United Nations victory [ia Soviet detachment, but 11 of the iDi9 onri iirhoaf at- ai mediately in uiuei iiiai. uui were put out of action and 1942 corn 5 per cent of their parity prices, as of the beginning of the marketing year. This was done to "prevent an increase in the cost of livestock and poultry and to aid in the pros- ecution of the war" by holding down feed costs. The recently enacted anti-infla- tion bill calls for loans designed to place a 90 per cent parity "floor" under the price of major crops, but that the rate may be held down to 85 per cent if neces- sary to facilitate production of live- would call for punishment of "ringleaders" responsible for "or- ganized murder" and other "atro- cities." Without- mentioning Hitler by name, the President disclosed that the United Nations were already moving to set up a commission to gather evidence for use af post-war mills may operate at capacity. about a company of German troops "In some sections the wiped out. Girl Who Tried To Hide Sorrows In Prison Freed Frankfort, Illinois girl who sought seclusion in a Ken- tucky prison because of an unhappy! love affair has been given her free-! of .Attu and a few after U. S. f in jAugusti occupied bases in the An- dreanof Islands, an Aleutians group which, at its nearest point, is about 125 miles east of Kiska. Japs Lose Planes Earlier in the day, reports from the Alaskan-Aleutians command said that in their first month of operations against the e n e m y, green American fighter pilots had j.m.iui3 22 Jap planes to every one American aircraft lost. Americans awaiting further de- dom after three years. jvelopments in the gathering Japa- Convicted of attempting to hold counter-offensive against Gua- up two other women in the rest room of a movie in Paducah, the woman, now 26 years old, gave her collected has exceeded our most Ule wjucu uui. _, Meanwhile fresh enemy as "Barbara Williams. She forcements were thrown into the refused to tell anything about her- optimistic hopes and the people battle. The communique self and declared she wanted to go the country should realize that theisajd a new facilities necessary to clean, pre-j arrived in pare, sort and bale this material '.will be taxed to the limit and that trials. Later, _______ _ Secretary of State, was asked by some time to move all this material. Sumner Welles, acting i operating at capacity, it will take reporters whether Hitler was one of those who would be placed on stock trial. He said he would leave the On'Capitol Hill, Assistant Price; answer to the excellent judgment Administrator J. K. Galbraith dis- those who raised the question. In the House of Lords at London, Viscount Maugham, former Lord Wednesday warning The British radio carried an the French American people to HMBONE'S MEDIATIONS By Alley A HEAP 0' JAPAMEESES w ARKANSAS WIP A FENCE AN' DATS PLACE To PUT NAlVR, vacate areas producing for Gcr- many or be bombed, while the po- tency of the flying fortresses was hailed in an exemplary way in the House of Commons and with forth- right fear in Tokyo. The Tokyo fears as heard by British listeners in India were ex- pressed by. a Japanese naval worked out' spokesman who told his people by radio that the United States is building long-range flying fort-t resses which could spring on Japan from the Aleutians and Midway Island. He said these great planes would have a range of miles, trmt America was assembling weapons in "astronomical quantity, and that the war is just beginning." Of the American warning to France, the BBCs French servjce explained tfiat it had originated in the United States shortwave tions broadcasting as "America calling Europe" and that it had been recorded in London and re- broadcast twice in French and twice in German. closed to the Senate Small Business Committee that regulations estab- lishing flat "dollar and cents" ceil- ings on meat products soon would be issued, to be followed during the fall by price ceilings on livestock. Spokesmen for some 600 inde- pendent packers, who complained to the committee they had been caught in a "squeeze" ceil- ings on their prices to retailers and rising livestok prices, applauded the announcement. Some of them, however, expressed disappointment later that Galbraith could not state definitely when live animal price ceilings could be One Killed, Two Hurl In Wreck Rumanian division had] to jail, according to parole rec- the area southeast ofjords here. Novorossisk, German-held Black i Sent to the new women s prison These victory stock piles, however, will and must ensure continued op- erations. "If trade channels cannot im-j mediately buy and start processing the, victory stock piles, I assure the] patriotic citizens of the country that the government will do so be- cause all of the material is so ur- gently needed." Chancellor, had demanded the death of "that gloomy monomaniac Hitler and the entourage he has gathered around him, the great majority of German fighting forces, and the Gestapo" in payment for acts of cold-blooded cruelty. Viscount Sirgon, present Lord Chancellor, said the British gov- ernment had-proposed creation of the United Nations commission to investigate war crimes. Simon said the commission should concern it- self with the activities of individ- uals regardless of rank. Average Is in cir- culation in this country has for the I junk being herded into the scrap first time in history reached of the nation was recorded in New The states .istcd as top ten so far in the 21-day scrap metal drive led by the news- papers Wednesday night were re- ported to have collected tons of junk for the steel mills. The newspapers' united scrap metal drive committee here said that while Oregon retained first place reached earlier in the day the states of Delaware and Iowa had bumped Oklahoma and West Virginia from the top-ten ranking. The mounting tonnage of metal Martinsville, V. Vick- ers, about 45, of Elon College, N. C., was killed and two other persons injured in the collision of a truck and Carolina Trailways Bus on a highway 15 miles south of Martins- .vcrage of more than per per-j reports pouring into the committee on, the treasury .disclosed Wednes-1 which now is twice daily issuing a la' SO! score sheet. Sea, base, and had been fighting for two days. Warm Weather To Be Continued Yesterday u'fis a nice day if you were in good mood. But if you got up on the wrong side of the hod you probably failed to notice that these inviirorating October days are giving you all of the pleasant temperatures of summer combined Vith the zip of autumn. Just in case you fell into the latter gentle re- minder should cause you to lift your drooping ears and sniff the brisk atmosphere Thursday when more of the moderate tempera- tures arc predicted for Tennessee and Virginia. For those who are mathemat- minded, Wednesday the day which takes its name from from Iho hTgliest of the Teutonic deities, Woden, and is also asso- ciated with the Roman god Mer- a high of 76 and a low of 41 degrees. in Shelby County on a 10-year as- sault to rob term, she identified herself as Ruth Strickland of Har- vey, 111., the records show, and made a statement declaring: "I committed this crime so I could get into prison, so two people who were obligated to me could be dalcanal, the airport island in the Solomons where our Marines are dug in, received further mysterious advices on the Japanese retreat in the other active sector in the South New Guinea. Australian troops, having now as- cended the southern side of the Owen Stanley range above Port Moresby, occupied the high pass at the top and found numerous enemy dead whose bodies bore no wounds. There was no reasonable explana- tion of the presence of these inert Japanese Zombies. The main force had withdrawn so fast as to escape contact with their Aussie pursuers. together." in any event it was safe to say She and another girl loved the that the latest Jap threat to Port same man, she explained.. Moresby had collapsed. That base, Afterwards she tired of prison life and begged clemency but Govs. .A. B. Chandler and Keen Johnson who adhered to policies of no clem- (ency save in a few extreme cases, jtold her she would have to await I parole in routine fashion after (serving half her term. Parole regulations were liberal- Train Uncoupled Injured were Hazel Finch, about 22, of Henderson, N. C., severe frac- ture of the. left leg, and John Weaver, 27, of Leaksville, N. C., and Martinsville, head injuries. Both were taken to a hospital at Leaksville. Redding, Engineers L Fanner Dl6S have found out why they've been I Warrenton, Col- starting out with a long train and bert, a farmer of about 50, was short one. Three they had learned ending with a boys confessed how to uncouple freight cars and had been doing it just for fun. burned to death Tuesday night in a fire "which destroyed his home, located three miles from here on route No. 50. Nan Is Convicted For Nailing Threats To Woman Who Had Been Dead Five Years (From State Xewn Service) Big Stone Gap, on the charge of writing threat- ening letters to a woman, who had been dead for five years, brought p. sentence of five years to Victor Gates of Big Stone Gap in United States District Court here. Wednesday. The unusual case, which start- ed in April, attracted con- siderable attention. The letters, introduced as were al- legedly mailed by Gates from Kingsport in April. 1940, to a Mrs. Palmer Cooper, who died in 1935. They threatened her life unless she brought in cash to the door of the old People's Bank Building in Appalachia at mid- night on April 25, 1940. The letters were turned over to the FBI and agents soon placed Gates under arrest. His convic- tion at the trial followed the tes- timony of hand-writing experts who stated that the writing on threatening letters was the same as that of Gates. Judge John Paul handed down this decision in the closing ses- sion of the district court. itself, was reported stronger than ever, with new troops, planes and material at hand General MacArthur's Headquar- ters, Australia The Allied ground offensive through the Owen Stanley mountains of New Guinea has been slowed by the difficulties of the terrain, a communique said ized this year, however, in order Thursday. to let convicts go into the Army, The war bulletin from and to relieve a labor shortage, and southwest Pacific headquarters ex- the girl was freed last July 24. An- thc slackening pace of tho nouncement of the release camel10.day with the comment: today when paroles granted to her and to 48 others were filed with the secretary of state. Noted Horse Given Reprieve San Fernando, 40-year-old horse that shared movie lame with the late Tom Mix, re- ceived a last-minute -reprieve from mercy death Wednesday._ Attorney Ivon D. Pa'rker, to whom Mix willed the horse, said he had postponed putting Tony to sleep until Saturday, because a taxidermist's truck broke down. The animal will be mounted and placed on exhibit with the cowboy actor's effects. English Tops Stockholm IP English is the most popular foreign language taught in Sweden's primary schools, of 250 classes devoted languages, 230 studied Last year, to foreign English. "This incredibly difficult range of mountains presents almost in- superable complications in main- tenance of supply lines for troop units of any size." It suggested that General Mac- Arthur's Australian jungle fighters now were finding themselves con- fronted with the same problems which halted the Japanese in'their earlier attempt to push through the same mountains for an attack on Port Moresby, Allied base in south- ern New Guinea. Divorcer Now Knows High Cost Of Living Clarksburg, W. years ago in Harrison County cir- cuit court, Judge Birk S.. Slathers told Mike Muniz his divorce would become final as soon as court coats were paid. Recently, the same Judge Stath- ers handed down an order granting Mike Muniz official leave from Lula Muniz. The costsv have juat been paid. iTWe Win We Must Pitch In! (This Slogan Won for Miss Etta I. Kilgore, Kingsport News Pays for Each Slogan Published-Mail Yours   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication