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Kingsport News Newspaper Archive: October 6, 1942 - Page 1

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   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - October 6, 1942, Kingsport, Tennessee                             Cards Capture World Series, 4-2 Weather _ Moderate tempera- KINGSPORT NEWS "Hie Paper With The Pictures" VOL.1. NO. KINGSPORT, TENN., TUES., OCT. 6. 1942 8 PAGES. SCENTS. Slocks Stock Market Long dormant helps to stem profit-taking: sell-off to keep list balanced. shares sold. change in market. NAZIS OPEN BIG DRIVE Kurowskis Homer Gives Birds Title Beazley Pitches Mates To Victory Second Time Sullivan Tax Rate Re-Set At Hawkins County Moves To Refund Bonds By Judson Bailey j tsr.kee Stadium, New He unconquerable St. Louis Car-1 dials swept over the New York; Ttr.kees, 4 to 2, Monday and into j the world's championship of base- County Court Kills Attempt To Boost Taxes By Ellis Binkley Staff Writer __ on the rec- bjll as George (Whitey) of the tax rate corn- capitalized their indomitable spiritImittee, headed by Squire J. F. with a two-run ninth inning homer Johnson, the Sullivan County quar- !or their fourth straight victory injterly court, meeting in regular ses- the five-game 1942 world series. Uion here Monday, re-set S2.15 as It took a mighty battle to make (the tax rate for the county for the renowned Yankees drop their jyear 1942. first world series since another Cardinal club turned the trick in 1926, but the ripping, roaring Red- birds convinced a great crowd of The retaining of the pres'.nt tax rate came as no surprise since it: was understood that the budget, although increased for the :'ans that they were made of could be met with the tax rate. the stuff of champions. Homers Count Alter winning three consecutive ganei with a show speed, the Cardinals of dazzling crushed the Bronx Bombers Monday at their own game homer hitting al- ttoujh they also continued their running and received a tonderfully pitched seven-hit game !rm lean and confident Johnny the 23-year-old rookie who tlso the second game of the Kriti at St. Louis. The climax came in the lowering diuk visibility so poor that sany of the fans in the huge con- crete arena were There Xuroivski's unable to tremendous fly rate. An attempt to boost the rate six and one-half cents was quickly killed when a motion was made to; meet the teachers' retirement fund; was tabled by the magistrates. No Action The teachers' retirement fund was left hanging in mid-air, with no action being taken, after talks by Kingsport Superintendent of Schools Ross N. Robinson, Bristol Superintendent of Schools John H. Arrants and others spoke in behalf of the fund. A motion made by Squire Matt Yoakley that the question of the retirement fund be deferred for the duration was lost by a 22-12 vote, but a vote on the matter itself was never called. Three attempts were made by Magistrate Paul Zimmerman to ob- tain an additional to com- plete the school building at Hol- ston Institute, but all failed. Squires Zimmerman and Yoakley pointed out that the building was partly completed when the funds were exhausted and the material and equipment already in place and some stored at the building site are being ruined by the weather. Resolution Fails The first resolution failed due to the lack of a quorum voting, the second attempted to "borrow" from the building fund until next year, and the third was deferred until the January term of the court. A resolution asking the Tennessee Good Morning A Little Chuckle To Start the Day Farragut, one knew the President of the United States was visiting the naval training station. The two workmen looked up as a car went by. Said one: "That almost looks like FDR himself." "Yep, but he's at the White House." They went back to work. llth District Assessment Hits Hark 'Second Front' Letter Discussed In Red Capital (From State Serrlce) Blountville A report by the Doard of equalization to members 3f the county court, meeting in .quarterly session here Monday, re- vealed that the heaviest assessment Df any district in the county is the llth (Kmgsport) with vvithin the city limits and corporation 'boundries landed, but they could see Left- .'ielder Charley Keller of the Yanks go tumbling head first over the low and ir.to the front seats '.travailing effort to reach the ball ar.d they could see Walker Cooper and Kuroivski trotting around the bases, with the runs that ended Xsw York's long domination of ''orld series play. Hit; Inning Cooper, whose hitting and catch- ir.g throughout the scries had been ncthing less than superb, opened the r.inth with a sharp single to risht-center and was sacrificed to second. Charley (Red) Ruffing, the old Yankee, whcelhorse who pitched ess hall for 7 2-3 innings in the "er at St. Louis, striking out Kurowski three straight times and getting credit for New York's only _____......- triumph of the scries, then went ginia-Tennessee "state line; the off-i to work carefully on the and the South Holston reser-j Mrookie third baseman from and between Cherokee Forest' I of the Next high was the 12th civil dis- trict (Bristol) with in- side and outside the city limits. The total assessment for the Bounty amounts to the committee reported, with acres being assessed at ind lots being assessed at The amount of personal prop- Worth Oi War Bonds To Be Bought Spurgeon Akers (State AVrlter) Rogersville The Hawkins county court voted Monday to refund worth of bonds as an alternative to raising the tax rate set for the year at the July meeting at the magistrates.. This refunding bond issue will enable the county to retire the county bonds which reach maturity in 1943. State funds will be available to pay off of the old bonds. To Buy War Bonds The court authorized F. L. Gard- ner, member of the county finance committee, and 'County Attorney J. O. Phillips, Jr. to purchase war bonds with the remaining of the school building fund. The fund was originally appro- priated to construct new school buildings at Rogersville, Bulls Gap, Mooresburg and Surgionsville buti the construction of the projects i was halted by the war. The build- i ing at Surgoinsville was but the others have been .postponed due to the urgency of wartime de- mands on building facilities. The! court authorized the purchase worth of bonds from the school construction fund at an earlier session. Among the routine business act- ed upon by the J. P.'s was the voting of S840 to be payed on the-of economic stabilization director salary of the county agent, jd ]d draws his pay from a combination i 6 auppuri. of state, federal and county leaders of labor, industry- and I U. S. Army Photo from. NBA) Heads Landing Looking like a, sea captain In Ms heavy amphibious for the star on his Brigadier General Eugene M. Landrum is -pictured as he direct- ed U. S. Army landing operations on the Andrcanof Islands of the Aleutians. Byrnes Calls For Unity, War On Inflation Willkie Hopes U. S. Learns Reds' Dire Needs Willkie, whose own statement on the second front caused worldwide reverbera- tions a. few days ago, Monday night expressed the hope that Joseph Stalin's letter to the Associated Press would "bring the Russians' imperative needs forcefully to the attention of the United Nations." Stalingrad Fighi Still Unchanged Nazi Siege Army Turned Toward Northwestern Area Note By Stalin Studied By U. S., British Officials By Henry C. Cassidy Copyright, 13J2. b.v The Associated Press Moscow Ambassadors of the United States and Britain evidently will'ask the Russian government to i ag.ainst Soviet troops who "re- clarify certain phrases of the Stalin enemy Germans have begun another huge drive in the northwestern suburbs of Stalingrad, hurling three infantry divisions, 100 tanks, and many dive-bombers letter in which the premier Red high command reported jti Lllc ni clared that a second front is in the Tuesday at the beginning of the first rank of importance to the of Soviet Union ar.3 in which he call-1. TAe Germans were acknowleged in Monday s mid-day communique ed upon Russia's allies to "fulfill their obligations fully and on time.' peoples of the; The two envoys, Admiral William Standley for the United States to have advanced slightly in this heavy fight raging in a workers' settlement, but the midnight bul- who as President Sir "for did "ncede anTirS, ill's envoy was preoarinc Mondav (German gains. velts envoy was preparing Monday ;Great Britai discussed the jettcr mghtto visit sections of the sprawl- nf ing Chinese battlefront where Chiang Kai-shek's millions have! been fighting the Japanese for more than five years, was keenly inter- ested in Stalin's letter to Henry C. Cassidy, Associated Press spondent in Moscow. [proved its positions in a relief of- fensive against the extended Nazi flank. Killed corre-jwhether creation of a second front! The swaying battle in the north- I in 1942 should be formally consid- western suburbs of the Volga River Informed of Stalin's assertions'ered an Allied obligation. icity was said to have cost the Ger- Main Issue Apparently the main issue is j that a second front is of "first rate j Russians generally have held it that Allied aid to i to be an obligation since the Wash- IRussia thus far has been of 'little and London statements after mans another tanks, but the men and 14 Russians continued HP-With a cal, __________ ______ emphasize Nazi strength in the i comparative importance, and that Vyacheslav Molotov's visits to those penetrated area. I the Allies could best help Russia capitals in the spring. Both of theso The siege army, estimated j by fulfilling their "obligations fully asserted that all three governments at men, apparently had iandon WiUkie commented: iwerc in agreement on urgent turned much, of its thwarted fury 'f Hope' Mr-JStalm s statement !task3 Of creating a second'front i n toward the northwestern section. will bring the Russians' imperative; Europe in 1942" There were no fresh reports of (I Washington, Sumnar Welles, heavy action ekewhere in the city's state told to the extent .'needs forcefully to the attention of j asngo the peoples of the United s That was the objective of my pub-; te that aid streets' Defenses in the Mozdok area unity in the fight against inflation, James F. Byrnes took over the post j New Committee Chairman Clinton Armstrong erty assessments was given as be-ivvas authorized to appoint a new agriculture generally. At the same time the office of! price administration moved swiftly ;i i. v wtta tlivejl us DC- f u. i_-i. i L ng and there were agriculture committee to name the i BtebUjze rent, at March 1 levels ere "ot polls reported. county agent for the coming year. The total assessment figure post has been held by R. E. not include utilities assessments Horn for the last 10 years. which will probably add approxi- 1 The court named Mr. Armstrong mately four million dollars to official county purchasing agent the committee reported. passed a resolution stating The assessment figure is a sub- stantial increase over last year and iis expected to take care of the rusoiuuoii HSKing me xemiussee nnn ,_ Valley Authority to take such steps 5 ln as will result in'the consolidation u memDers sai of the area lying between the Vir- the rs said. The total assessment of districts reported follows: First, Pa. by the committee is as second, and reservoir, in the fourth. fifth, _____ He got the count to one and one downed property was passed. and served up n half-speed pitch j It was pointed out that the small sixth, seventh, eighth, nineth, took a lusty wanted it, because he swing and the ball one big arc into the lower It was a knockout and everyone although the Yanks got men on base with none out in eir final chance. The Cardinals e CAHDrXALS on rage Two) "AMBONE'S MEDITATIONS By Alle; rest of the county. Amount Cut A resolution asking for for the hot lunch, gardening and can- the the nmg programs underprivileged operated children for in ;hat must have hung exactly where will be isolated from county tenth, eleventh, administration, including schools, eleventh, outside, roads, health administration twelfth, thirteenth, adequate policing due to the wat- fourteenth, flf- crs of the reservoir and the sixteenth, which will cut the area off from outside, seven- teenth, seventeenth, out- side, eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, 620; twenty-first, and twen- ty-second, The county's financial condition it the end of the past quarter was jiven by Auditor Joe Richards as being "very good." His report showed that the cash an hand as of September 1. in the ordinary fund was inter- est fund, sinking fund, insurance, pike repair, overdraft, bridge, high school, ele- mentary school, and school building fund, Million Dollars Sought In TB Fight 100KUK MA'IED FOLKS COULD FIN' ELSE .to FUSS ER-BOUT WIP- FUSSIM' OVUM that they would not be responsible for any ere not I to freeze retail food prices pending the im- position of permanent ceilings. Still awaited was its action to control the price of livestock, grains Allies And Japs Continue Savage Ground Clashes battle for Called Important In diplomatic circles at Moscow the Stalin letter, which was deliv- ered to this correspondent Sunday i holding generally. One Soviet unit j there was credited in the midnight I communique with killing 600 Nazis and destroying 12 tanks in one day's fight at an unnamed inhabited locality. in response to three written ques- Tne Moscow radio reported last tions, was considered an impor-in'Sht thart Russian troops had tant development bringing into a seven-mile gain on one open the apparent disagreement the western front, pre- tween Allied capitals. :sumably the Rzhev area, and cap- The most significant phrase was itured an height, considered to be this: "In order to1 amplify improve this aid (from i or any debts incurred by directives, presumably county without the approval of through the War Labor Board for cnforcement of the wage and salary ground cashes and mounting and other farm commodities and Idestruct.on of enemy planes the the Solomons continues with western only one thing mounting is required: That the Allies "fulfill1 Armstrong Two hundred dollars was to carry on the food stamp pro- gram, the Hawkins system of pro- viding relief for needy until the January meeting of thei stabilization which the act and President Rooseveit's order reeled. Navy reported Monday, while Army bombers, operating from new bases in the Aleutians and favored by good weather, have stepped up their hammering attacks on the Japs at Kiska. The Marines are their obligations fully and on time." In preceding paragraphs. Stalin had stated that the part played by a second front in Soviet estimates of the current situation is in "a very important place, one might rate impor- s r Supre Three Appointed Magistrates George H. 'Camp- -Lw-o.ei.ji.iat.cij ji. f bell, A. O. Livingston and W. 'S. d Armstrong were apopinted as a finance committee. Damage of was awarded to Clyde Bowman, who lost an eye T, in an in jury suffered while working PVLB. aenci out of his office there during the forenoon and took over his new desk in the "left as he call- m v S tneir Guadalcanal in Saturday moved say a place of first maintaining and further: tr TT- Ha activities there for the rest of the day were not made public but it for the county road department. Fate stable bounty sleeted Fletcher of the was elected seventh constables by popular are vote, but no county was reduced to by the squires and passed. By act of the magistrates a spe- cial prosecutor will be employed by the county to handle all cases against delinquent tax payers now pending in the courts of the county. Th'e bill provides that the prose- cutor will see that the cases are dis- posed of as quickly as possible. A time-saver resolution, that was passed by the court, provides that several reports be made to a com- mittee which will in turn report to the court, eleminating the read- ing of the lengthy reports by the department heads. The resignation of Magistrate S. M. Morrell as coroner was ac- cepted by the court and W. S. Baumgardner was elected by ac- clamation. Sixteen new members who were elected to the court in August and were sworn in on September 1 an- swered the roll call and were wel- comed to the tribunal body by County Judge T. R. Bandy. Judge Bandy told the new mem- jers, "You are county representa- tives. Although you were elected by your own district, you are still under obligation to act in accord- ance with what would be best for the entire county. If you follow the (See COUNTY COURT Page Three) an investment to the "state'." one was interested in the post at the time of the August election. Hence the action of the court in this case. The much discussed subject of "As compared with the aid which the Soviet Union is giving to the Allies by drawing upon itself the main force of the German Fascist, the aid of the Allies to the Soviet Union has so far been little ef- fective." Blackout Tesi To Be Tonight wrote Byrnes during the day thatlmons during four days of wide- The blackout for this area will "thousands of useless middlemen" j spread action last week damaged j begin at 9 o'clock Tuesday night it.. an enemy destroyer, shot down 10 and last 45 minutes, according to the Solomons, said a communique, and frequent short engagements be- tween the opposing ground forces have made no important changes in the lines. However, despite hard- hitting American air attacks, the Japanese have succeeded in land- troops on the agencies and put the whole stabili- zation machinery into high gear as speedily as possible. Chairman Fulmer (D-S. C.) of ;ithe House agriculture committee j islands. Report From Navy In three communiques, the Navy reported today that: (1) American fliers In the Solo- were "sapping the very life blood out of producers and consumers" and urging action in the situation. His committee plans an investiga- 1 bWjlllltllLUCIJldfiaclJllJl UOLittt" the county poor farm came up again tion of thc a between when the court passed a consumer prices, tion providing for the appoint- ment of a to investigate conditions and make a report at; the next term. P. R. Cooler was eleceted to wait on the trial jury and Harve Mayes to wait on the grand jury for the next term of circuit court. The Tennessee Association needs Memphis Tuberculosis nearly for increased tuberculosis work because of war demands on workers, Dr. Horton Casparis, association president, said Monday. Leading discussions of the asso- ciation meeting in conjunction with the southern tuberculosis confer- ence, Dr. Casparis declared: "Tuberculosis cost the state of Tennessee over in money and manhourg last year. The money we are asking for, to establish an effective hospital program, will be Gates Named Cooler Weather Is Predicted Yesterday was a passing luck of good weather. Raids extend from Indian Springs west to Church Hill enemy aircraft and damaged two !OCD officials. others, with no American losses' The area involved in the test reported. This brought the total of Japanese planes destroyed in the Solomons to date to 229, and tha enemy also has suffered 29 ships sunk or damaged there. C2> The drive aimefl at dislodg- ing the Japanese from their west- ern Aleutian footholds, marked last Saturday by announcement that American forces had occupied the Andreanof 'group between Kiska and Dutch Harbor, has had the 15 Face Draft Evasion Charges Big Stone Gap, Va. The question of whether members of the religious sect known as Je- hovah's witnesses should be per- mitted to claim deferment under the selective service act as con- scientious objectors will be argued Tuesday before Judge John Paul of the United States District Court for Western Virginia. Indictments charging failure to report for induction under the se- lective service act were returned against 15 persons at the opening of the federal court session Mon- day morning. Among those indicted were some who claimed right to deferment as conscientious objec- tors. Victor Gates of Big Stone Gap, today was found guilty of an at- tempt to extort S2.000 from Mrs. Palmer Cooper of Keokee, Va. The. morning was spent in hearing testi- mony of handwriting experts who examined threatening letters which Mrs. Cooper claimed s'he received from Gates. Hawkins County, and from the Vir-! Gates w-as arrested by FBI men ginia State line south to Gardens to Fordtown. Motor traffic approaching blackout area will be stopped Sullivan in Big Stone Gap. He will be sentenced on Wednes- the and day. forbidden to enter the area, offi- cials say. State and county au-. thorities will enforce this regula-; tion, it was Road signs three.feet square will I of a melancholy Monday a mystic brew of the dull Frankfort, Gates, ?raJ' mixed bespectacled 36-year-old adminis- trator from Morton's Gap, Mo: became Kentucky's revenue com missioner, succeeding Herman Clyde Reeves who resigned the big post to accept a lieutenant's com- mission in the Coast Guard Reserve. against the enemy have occurred almost daily, with five enemy sea nf fail -ait shot down last Friday ana i onage, on ttoute Hi at Sullivan (.Jar-, to raise tne teaerai income to autumn which showprpd a rorll exPlosive and incendiary hits dens, west of the underpass at around a year will bs of "inches SundavniEht and ThunMtay and Friday the Church Hill, on Route 23 at the asked of Congress as soon as it en- C0m-l_l OUIlUtty IllgnC ana Ki5kfl onH coanlunn honl.o. -i.-t- tUn be placed on Route 11-W at Indian d i Springs, on Route 23 at the Ford- r bridge, More Billions In Taxes Asked road closest to Hammond I new on Route 81 at Sullivan Gar-1 to raise the federal income to M Markets At A Glance onday, disappeared by noon, but the blue atmosphere lingered on throughout the day with a slight wind as the only ray of brightness in Kiska camp and seaplane hangar. I state line and at Bloomingdale on acts the pending revenue measure, (3) The Navy's submarine Bloomingdale Pike. [Secretary Morgenthau said Monday, ion is long overdue in the All motor vehicles approaching! The Treasury foad told a press and must be presumed to be lost.; these points will be required to'conference he would request a bill the otherwise drab picture. One of the "ation's newest under-1stop and park off the highway bring in "at least In such a deary mood October Isea craft- the Ii526-ton Grunion was much as possible, to extinguish [and possibly much more." At tho eased back into the ranks of fall, last 22 at'their lights and to shut off the same time, he said the Treasury setting her gauge with 74 and Shc commanded by ignition of their cars for the re- Hogs decline sharply. I me'rcuriaf extremes Commander Mannart L. Abele, imainder of the blackout. Cattle and sheep generally steady. and rye pace grains lower. unsettled 24-hour period. of Quincy, Mass., and although the! Particular attention by those re- Tuesday the season will begin toiNavy did not announce the size of jsponsible for lighted highway and inch forward again, with crew, the normal complement other advertising signs will be re- slcuv. Butter and eggs firm. Words: and l weather predicted for both vessels of her size !see and Virginia. 'mately 65 men. is quired to insure the successful ex- ecution of blackout provisions. believed it must have a "minimum, of a year revenue to operate during the tvar." His use of those two figures raised the possibility of controversy over the need for a new tax bill raising as much as Shoulder Your Guns To Shoot The Huns! (This Slogan Won for Kenneth Osborne (Age Rural Route. No. 2, Castlewood, .Va.. The Kingsport News Pays for Every.   

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