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Kingsport News Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1942 - Page 1

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Location: Kingsport, Tennessee

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   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - October 3, 1942, Kingsport, Tennessee                             Signs Rnti-Iniiation Bill Weather lennessee-Quitc warm. Showers west portion. Moderate temperature ercd light showers. KINGSPORT NEWS "The Paper With The Pictures' VOL.1. NO. 78. KINGSPORT, TENN., SAT., OCT. 3, 1942 B PAGES. SCENTS. Slocks Stock Mark'eln-Stocks In general, with steels leading way, ad- vance. shares sold. keep bond market stabilized. lost In Action Wwetted on an oil-covered sea, the U. S. Naval Auxiliary ship Calhoun, right, close to the smoke battle starts "her plunge to the bottom near Guadalcanal during an early action in the Solomons. Stmrttarieo'jsiy with the release of this dramatic photo, Navy announced loss of two transports in the Solomons. Casualties were reported light. Australian Bush Soldiers Advance, But Meet No Japs Navy Reports 932 Casualties In Two Weeks Casualties of CJi Xaval forges-reported to next in the period September 7 to Sntember 2i totaled 932 dead, mcnc'ed and missing. This was announced by the Navy Bfjirmrat Friday night in con- with the issuance of its teteenth casualty list of the war. The list, Riven out for local publi- cation only, included 162 dead, 67 Branded ,'tnd 703 missing and cov- md officers and men from all Men Surprised When No Enemy Resistance Made General MacArthur's Headquar-1 ters, Aus-1 tralian bush soldiers, pushing up the slippery slopes of the Owen! Stanley mountains, have passed; School Teacher Killed By Lad Caught Smoking Bill Passed And Signed In One Day Broad Authority Given President To Control Costs JP Surrounded by congressional leaders and intimate advisers, President Roosevelt Fri- day night signed the anti-inflation bill giving aim broad authority to stabilize prices, wages and sal- aries. The White House announced shortly afterward that an execu- tive order in connection with the measure would be signed and is- sued Saturday. Bill Rushed The bill, which had been rushed through the last stages of congres- sional consideration during the day, was delivered at the White House ebout p.m. Teh President im- mediately began a discussion of the measure with a group of con- gressional leaders and other offi- cials who had assembled to see it signed into law. The chief execu- tive affixed his signature at Looking on were: Attorney General Biddle. Secre- tary of Commerce Jones, Herbert Gaston. assistant secretary of the treasury; Harold Smith, director of Roosevelt Views SuJb That Sank 9 Jap Ships President Roosevelt discusses with west coast naval officers the exploits of this U. S. submarine (back- ground) shown at Mare Island, Calif. The nir.e Rising Sun flags (arrow) on the conning tower indicate the number oj Japanese ships the submarine has sent to the bottom. The President included this naval base in his tour of defense facilities and war plants. Read story on Page 3 how American subs and army bombers played hai-oc with Jap ships in Pacific. from-Port Moresby, General Mac-: a popular mathematics teacher at tie bureau. Arthur'announced Saturday. [Brooklyn's William J. Gaynor Jun- of labor 'ciairmaff orm comolished "without jfl auc, assisuciiii, LU LUC BCUIC by one two ys Judge Samuel establishing Ine caught smoking In a school man. Supreme1 Court Justice Reds Better Positions In And Near Stalingrad contact with the the bul- wash room. Byrnes, Harry Hopkins, ator letin from Allied headquarters Assistant District Attorney Na- Barkley, the Senate majority lead- and the Math said Joseph RVpres'enta- whfch'6 nierces crest of the 119> admitted firing the fatal bullet (tive McCormack of Massachusetts, mountains. Delaware, I What'had happened so suddenly admitted firing the fatal bullet (tive McCormack after Neil Simonelli, 16, had majority leader of the House. ed the pistol at Goodman and !to the apparentlV strong force of d th trj twice tbe mg the IT of nnp Hmp drove !P trigger twice, me gun jferencc 1 Ailing to fire both times. Neither passed i o nnp mp rove Ailing f Kates except Arizona, Nevada anr! Wyoming. The latest casualty figures raised the raw's announced casualty .'or the'war to 14.466, made up of and then seemed to melt away still 4.099 3.232 wounded and was not expla.ned in official an- a-ssing i nouncements. The rasualtv list includes not; Allied air stri also'of 'nc pack trail fo anese retreat, however bHdge, Inl -s not untii a change of classes Moulded into its final form dur- ing the day by a Senate-House con- committee, the measure passed the House on a vote of 257; 22. It was rushed at once to the debate 70-year-old former Herriol, Former French Premier, Reported Jailed German Losses Run High For Single j Day In Big City Moscow HP The Red army punched more holes in the Nazi i flank northwest of Stalingrad Fri- and bettered its positions in a Edouard fight inside the ty which today entered itsJL. Montgomery announced Friday premier of list only naval personnel, but numbers of the Marine Corpr. andmay Coas: Guard, although in List 1'i only one Const Guard namt ap- peared. a V0ice add'; France, was reported under arrest. A hjgh command communique at midnight said the stoic Stalingrad, garrison had killed more _ ;at his chateau outside Lyon in un- Democratic Leader; _ _ the Senate author- occupied France Friday night be Fortresses Blast Trio Axis Bases Germans Lose Planes In France During Attack By Wes Gallagher With the United States Bomber Command Scmewhere in America's growing air force unleashed its most powerful attack of the war Friday with flying fort- resses blasting a Nazi aircraft fac- tory at Meaulte and an airfield at St. Omer in northern France, and shooting down 13 of Germany's crack fighter planes. U. S. Boston bombers at the same- time bombed Le Havre's docks, and escorting American and Allied fighters totalling 400 accounted for another five Nazi Focke Wulfe 193 planes in the biggest air battles since the Dieppe raid. American Eagle squadrons, re- cently transferred to the United States army air forces from the RAF. accounted for four of the jfive fighter plane victories. i Fortresses Safe I All the fortress planes returned jfrom their 13th raid which saw air- men from 42 states battling as many as 100 German fighters five miles high over Europe. Likewise all the Boston, bombers used in the heavy strike returned to their bases. Six Allied fighter planes were lost, but the pilot of one of them was safe, a joint U.-S. army ard British air ministry communique said. At the same time Britian's secret I mosquito planes, fresh from their i assault on Gestapo headquarters in Nazi-occupied Oslo last Friday, con- tributed to the general Allied I scheme to wreck Hitler's war ma- j chine by a raid on iron and I steel works near Liege. The powerful fortress flight, led by Col. Ronald Walker, of Spokane. Wash., shot Reichmarshal Goer- ling's prize yellow nose squadron other crack Focke-Wulf 190 Cairo, Egypt-.y-Lieut. Gen. B. Mr.jor Charles C. Keglman of El eno, Okla.. who won the distin- that his Eighth Army is preparing guished service cross in the fs.med for the "next round" as the end of Julv raid on Holland in the first venture of American bomb- summer brought conviction among ,ers Qver Western Europe in this New Outbreak Seen In Africa In Fall, Winter share of cas- Japanee supply bottleneck on the trail from Buna, was.now the enemy, the navy said. In- "almost completely destroyed. da-led, however, were the names c! those lost in accidents at sea or the air during duty connected ftrprUy with war operations. Dea'l an.-l next of kin: at a.m. that Goodman's body was found. Math said that Simonelli first responsibility for the slayinp, that later when he and An- Mrs. American flying smashed at the distant bases of Rabaul and Buin in New Britain j Simonelli told his and the Solomons, scoring a nit on i v one cruiser, setting two large trans- ports afire with direct hits and Sarah probably hitting a second cruiser ;and another vessel. The Rabaul airdrome and an am- mother Kfbb of Knoxville. Hissing aivl next of kin: Oscrr John Bennett, _ f-v father, Stanford thc at Buka ln the nunziata were brought together at I chum: "Go ahead, handsome, tell these people the truth." Math said Annunziata replied: "All did it. I killed that munition dump also were blasted, 1 SimiicI Cant roll, mess attendant, lather. Judge C.intrell, 104'i Jack- son Aver ;ie. Knoxville. Jim T.-.ylnr, fireman, first class, Jc.hr. H. Taylor, Johnson Solomons attacked. HAMBONE'S MEDITATIONS By Alley A MAM A WAUIT fwPuRliOES HIT AIM' MO Joe Cannon, Head 01 Plane Plant, Killed No Poll Tax Plan Is Hit day ig: final action came one, later than the October 1 dead-.made The German and Italian radios city, the announcement, without. nra ongmery ae s line set by the President, and was giving the reasons for the arrest, a 'vedge "ve" announcement after his troops in a reached only after a vehement con-; troversy over standards governing] the enemy's positions after 16 of and the Swiss telegraph agency re-ithe 50 agamst them rocky ridge, ._ _____ ___ rica JDU' fut'le efforts to bag one of the There the Russians were said to; Gcnera] Montpomcry made his mammoth planes. Only two have been shot LLUVC13VUVUI it. f TT'U UJ1_ J J. 1 the establishment of prices on farm If- ed in a dispatch .rom Vichy ,had been destroyed. commodities. This ended in a com- that he had been under surveillance f promise, however, and Friday's I pinched the El Alamein line 80 miles west of Alex- andria and after American four- motored bombers, striking, deep j B i for several days since writing a let-! Germans Blasted ?he I In front north-j into the Axis supply system, tempers and frayed nerves that ac- i companicd the earlier stages of its not stand for, consideration. dragged into a war against tneir How Bill Works former Allies. In general the bill directs the! An Axis-controlled station. Ra- ment and declaring that French- Stalingrad the communique shipping in the harbor of Pylos on fn, !said the Russians aid this: j the southeast coast of Greece. Dislodged the Germans from aj The mammoth raiders more number of fortified points, includ- j than 200 of which, the Vichy radio ing a smashed seven enemy said, recently have flown toward fic-.tui LUC I jin hv Rpl. tanks, five guns, 34 battlegrounds by President to issue an order stabil- "4-w, nrvtcVdprlarP Fri ;alld olit about companies way of Gibraltar-were declared in izing wages, prices and salaries by thus far. First Lieut. John M. Smith, Brooklyn, N. Y. bombardier in Col. Walker's plane, said "despite the _ camouflage the target showed up j plain anl I could see bombs bursting all over it." 1. So far as is practicable, n'Sh? to be stabilized at the; mv.ot OI Nov. they are levels of Sept. 15, 1942. Farm price ceilings can not be that Herriot somber "pivot of n somber against the policv of Marshal had bee" burled as station- m tain and his government." :ary ,bl In Ixmdon. the arrest drew the In.the cUy area itself the com-j. as a prerequisite to voting for members of congress and president- ial electors was disapproved Friday -N' f JD Tno IT ran 'by a senate judiciary subcommittee, no? J A report which bore the names Corporation of Charlotte, a member of the wealthy Concord, Connallv (D-Tex and Aus-' The government crop loan rate is N. C., textile family, and two jfixed at 90 per cent of parity for the duration of the war and mell) enemy infantry; communique to have scored two captured 330 crippled German tanks direct hits or. one supply merchant- man yesterday and a large num- ber of near misses on others. One German Messerschmitt fight- which rose to sent off smoking, fighters, trailing into a look at a feeble and disap- addecl. 'Enough Food' Seen By Nelson pance am to the republic'' Franc andto epublic flyers were killed in a plane crash late Friday near Morris Field here. The other victims were Lieut, j Jenkins M. Robertson of and J. R. Ibing. They were killed j instantly when their Ferry Com-! mand B-34 transport plane plunged; into a forest about two miles south-' west of the field. Details of the crash were an- nounced by the public relations of- fice of Morris Field at 9 p.m. Cannon was piloting the two-mo- tored plane as it was coming in (at a landing when it plunged into the woods. The plane was enroute from Love Field, Dallas, Tex. It had landed at Jackson, Miss., and again at Greenville, S. C. Cannon, a membnr of the U. S. Ferry Command, was the son of the late Joe F. Cannon, textile magnate of Concord. He was a brother of Anne Cannon, divorced wife of the late Zachary Smith Reynolds, to- oacco heir. Warmer Wealher Seen For Day two years after the termination of hostilities. This is conditioned, jor arrest 01 .nerrioL was 'which the experienced Pierre Laval. chief of the never Vichy Amid prepara- tions for meat rationing and ef- forts to cope with the farm labor "i! j shortage, Chairman Donald M. Nel- son of the War Production Board gave definite assurance Friday that "there will be enough food to eat" during the war. Nelson gave this "considered statement" to the House agricul- ture committee whose members have warned that the labor situa- tion threatened to result in an acute food shoortage. Nelson ac- knowledged that the farm problem was a major one but expressed con- Like her predecessor, October seems prone to live in the past and enjoin the balmy breezes of linger on after her fate has been plainly scaled-to bring the year's most beautiful Could he it only seems to he, but Friday's temperatures of 80 to 42 degrees were of the right brand. And the forecast for Sat- urday sounds as though the re- vival of summer is here. Virginia point between 5 and 00 per cent for learn and wheat if it becomes de- 'nconce.vable, headquarters added. js'rable to avoid high prices for live; i stock and poultry feed. j Public utility and common carrier j 'rates may only on condi- tion that such concerns give 30 a now fast-dying summer, who notice to the President and makes a last gallant stand to j permit a representative of the Price Administrator to appear in. behalf of consumers at any rate] hearing that may be held. The conference committee made j earlier in the week came one change in the wage-salary sec-1 unharmed anil intact. I tion of the bill, the effect of which j Thanks to Mrs. Flora Kurd, I was to require the President to find 54 Robert E. Lee apartments, not only that there were "gross! who found Christian's wallet con- inequities" but that the effective taining the muney in Kiess' store enough and intelligent nation to meet the "About one battalion (500 The dawn thrust Wednesday by DcGaulle's headquarters said the of German infantry was wiped out'British forces, erased a wedge arrest of Herriot was a blunder, i" street it added. i around the El Munassib de- Those two actions apparently j pression near the center of the El government formed part of the Red army's stif-i Alamein line which had existed a ur or would never make unless he was fencri stand in the northwestern (since German Marshal Erwin Rom- t, u. however by an authorization to d make un, h stalingrad where the mel made his abortive thrust the are toset theloan rateat a, blunder b-- Petain is Russians yesterday acknowledged week of! September. I ja 200-yard German penetration. The British thus gained fairly j In the Caucasus the Russians said j h'Sh ground around the lip of the, (their troops withdrew to new posi- [depression, but British sources em-1 tions in a defensive fight east that its value should not iMozdok on the road to Grozny's overestimated, jfields, 50 miles away. The. corn-' Imunique said more than two enemy !infantry companies were wiped out and 19 tanks crippled or burned before the withdrawal. Recovered Through Ad Billy Christian Friday. The felt unusually he had lost home Good Mormncj A Little Chuckle Markets Ai A Glance j Stazt the draws moderate temperatures, I prosecution of the war demanded with scattered light showers. Ten- action before he. could sanction nesseans are slated to be quite raises in wages and salaries above warm Saturday. ithe Sept. 15 level. several days ago. She kept the money until she saw his ad in the Kingsport Times and News when it was returned to him. Livestock Hog prices hit new high at 515.70 for best. Cattle and sheep generally steady. j grains decline. poultry irregu- ]ar and live poultry weaker. Butter ;and eggs firm. Topeka, Kas. JP Patrol- men Eugene Martin and Frank Kinney filed this report on a disturbance call: "There was a man sick. His wife wanted us to make him take his medicine, but we would not bother with it, so we left." Husband Claims Wife 'Bought' Him case of a hus- band who claimed his wife "bought" him 13 years ago when they lived in Germany came up in superior court Thursday. The husband, Bernhard Desaaer, 39, is a refugee. His attorney, Sol R. Friedman, stated that "Mrs. Desauer and her father bought the plaintiff on Dec. 8, 1929. when the wedding took place. He said the transaction took place in Wurts- burg and involved marks. The- couple, he added, separated' after a two-day honeymoon. fighting Words: Turn In Razor Blades To Shave Tojol (This Slogan won SI for James Lambert, Route No. 3, Castlewood, Va. The Kingsport News pays for each slogan published. 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