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Kingsport News Newspaper Archive: October 02, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Kingsport News

Location: Kingsport, Tennessee

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   Kingsport News (Newspaper) - October 2, 1942, Kingsport, Tennessee                             Cards Tie Series On Musial'sHit. 4-3 Weather KINGSPORT NEWS "Tie Paper With The VOfcl. NO. 77. KINGSPORT, TENN., FRI., OCT. 2, 1942 S PAGES. 5 CENTS. Stocks Stock In October with brisk rally. shares traded. issues return to re- covery side. NAZIS LOOK FOR INVASIO Inning Bally Nips Yankees Speed On Bases Turns Tide For Red Birds By Judson Bailey Sportsman's Park, St. the same speed and grit won them the National championship, the St. Louis Cardinals Thursday tamed the New york Yankees 4 to 3 before 34.255 tea in another breath-taking ciapter of the 1942 world series jnd !eft for New York all even with the American League power- bouse. Toe Redbirds simply ran their (fay to victory with probably. the nojt dazzling show of sprinting the present Yankees ever had 'seen aid their will to win more than offset New York's slugging which w climaxed with a tremendous tru-run homer by Charley (King Kcngi Keller to momentarily tie the score in the eighth inning. Held to only six hits by big Ernie Bonham while the Yankees pum- meled Johnny Beazley, the Cards' 23-year-old rookie sensation for 10, St. Louis scored twice in the first inning, again in the seventh an'd finillywon the game with another thrilling tally in the last half of tpei Figures in Cards figured in .every the Crtnil Tuns but tiui trith the score tied and .the pressure on in the eighth, Jim Brown and Terry .-Moore were easy outs but Enos Slaughter slsamed a scorching liner to the dHpest corner of right field and slid headlong into second base for Roy Cullenbine. who had besn somewhat confused by the P.edbirds' earlier footracing, made a jood throw to the bag, but little Phil Riziuto let the ball slip a few yards away from him and while he Kill was trying to locate it Slaughter jumped to his feet and tohed safely to third. Be.'ore the smoke had cleared Going Dcrvey Jones '.'his enemy submarine ii getting its last look at the surface. R.C.A.F. "Bolingbroke" bomber sightea. the Nazi tea raider on the turfa.ce, circled, it and let fly with bomb's. Sub crashed-dived, but reappear- .ed a moment later at this crazyjingle as bombs blasted it out of the water. Then it sank, leaving trail of air bubbles and a patch of oil. Bill Delay Criticized By Roosevelt Virginia Ends Aisemilj Meet Richmond, Virginia General Assembly adjourned sine die Thursday afternoon after a three-day special session .devoted largely to Adopting measures to liquidate the state's public debt and to consideration of bills related to the war effort. Debate over provisions of a bill to .-permit men in the armed serv- ices to run for office carried the Senate and House over into an aft- ernoon session, but the session end- ed quietly as the controversial Stsn Musial, the rookie died in committee. had a chance to be a hero Wednesday and failed, smashed a ground single directly over second base tp bring home the deciding run. Much of the responsibility for lie Yankees' defeat could be charged to the fact that Bonham, 'lie great control artist who walk- r.nly 23 men during the entire American League season, gave a bass on balls to the first batter he faced. t Apparently feeling the tension that scries, Bonham {h'rew three bears heavily on all in to Brown before he got a strike across at the start of the Same and Brown ultimately was Pissed. Brown Beats Throw was a costly mistake because "We laid down a sacrifice bunt w the first pitch and when the'big ace threw to second trying wtead off the run, Brown beat foe tnrow and both runners were safe. on Page Two) HARSONE'S MEDITATIONS By Allty ToM'fioT BE IN' To 5ECH PAT HE House Form Bloc Leaders Accept Senate's Measure Ecgaujent: Roosevelt Thursday criticized the delay in Congress in enacting his anti-inflation program, but reserved an opinion on the Senate com- promise bill until he had conferred with congressional leaders tonight. He told a press conference a special one called to report on his two-week tour of the country that he would confer with some of the leaders tonight, mostly by tele- phone. He did not say, however, whether any of them .would call personally at the White House. He also .related a hitherto unpub- lished account of a reunion he- had with former Vice-President Garner at Garner's home at Uvalde, Texas, during his '-var plant inspection tour. He reported that Garner agreed with most of the people the President had talked with on his journeyr namely, that the people were a bit jittery about the in- crease in the cost of living. The President added that Garner contended, as did others with whom he talked, that anything that could be done to prevent this in- crease would remove one of the major fears in the country districts. In criticizing the delay on his anti-inflation program, the Presi- dent compared today's Congress with that in 1933 when, he said, it was the normal thing for Congress to- pass needed legislation in a purely domestic economic crisis in 24 hours or in a couple of days. Contrasts Americans Have Way 01 Gelling Scrap For Bombs Air, Ground Forces Hit Japs Hard Australians Have Little Trouble In Moving Ahead General MacArthur's Headquar- ters, meet- ing any Japanese opposition, hard- ened Australian soldiers made progress Friday through the moun- tains and jungles of New Guinea toward Menari, 46 miles north of Port Moresby, while Allied heavy bombers destroyed a large section of the important Wairopi bridge on the Japanese supply line, General MacArthur announced. The Japanese were being harried from the jungle and from the air by the Allied offensive in the Owen Stanley mountains. The advancing Australians have advanced more than ten miles over tortuous terrain since they dislodged the Japanese from their advance point only 32 President Says War Production Is At High Peak miles from Port Moresby. "Ground forces continued to (By The Prni) Americans, brewing a mess of steel destruction for the Axis, today had cooked up individual ways of harvesting vital metal scrap for the mills' wur furnaces. Their collection schemes ranged from declaring a business holiday j A' progress north of Nauro toward General MacArthur's com- munique said today. The communique gave no indica- tion of the exact distances the Aus- tralians have advanced .although it was considerably less 'than, the pre- vious day. Nauro is 42 miles north of Port Moresby and Menari is four miles inbr'th of. Allied heavy bombers and fight- i ers. the communique- 'said, "ex- ecuted a series of'co-ordinated at- tacks -on the Wairopi bridge, .which had been partially repaired during the night, making direct hits. "A large section of the 'span was destroyed by high explosives; fires were started by incendiary straf- so merchants could get out and join A spokesman said the bridge ap- to be a bottleneck in sup- cream for every set of old license plates contributed. While the three-week collection drive under the leadership of the nation's newspapers went through its fourth day, plans were .being completed to turn loose a young army whose eager eyes will find the scrap their elders may have missed. Children Aid Employers how join Next Monday school children, trained by their teachers and employees will to look for metal junk, will the hunt on a nation-wide, organized scale. Here were some of-the things that happened or we're going to happen as householders, farmers, factory hands and bosses came up with scrap that can be translated by a mill into tanks, guns, planes, ships, bombs, helmets: A scrap holiday will be declared in Martinsville, Va., next Wednes- He contrasted this with today's i day at 1 p.m. so every business firm situation where he said the very existence of the nation was threat- ened from the outside and it was important to have speed. the row in Congress over farm price ceilings in the anti- inflation bill appeared to be near- ing a peaceful ending as House farm bloc leaders disclosed they would support a compromise ap- proved by the Senate. As plans were drawn by admin- istration leaders. Congress will give except those engaged in the war close its doors. Employers and employes comb their shops for scrap will and Earlier in the day, another con- troversial measure giving sweeping powers to the governor during the killed by the House courts of justice committee. The special session passed 22 bills and killed four others. In addition to the war emergency powers bill ami the war candidate bill, the House killed on the floor a bill'to furnish free birth certifi- cates to .men in the armed forces and to members of their families. A House bill'authorizing the gov- ernor and the state treasurer, joint- ly, to invest surplus state funds and a providing for the liquidation debt" were dis- missed because they were'identical with other .bills approved. ..i Lee Teachers To 3ny Bonds Jo'nesville, JP teachers in-the'public schools cf County have united in author- izing the division, superintendent, S. J. Shelburrie, of Pennlngton Gap, "10 -per 'cen'j of their monthly salaries for the purchase r____________ _______ of .war bonds 'and stamps, effective morrow and send it on to the White He got about set. sold them with the first'school month of the House. It will arrive there one clay'as scrap for and gave the money to the Navy Relief Fund. Two 28-year old fire trucks complete with solid rubber were given by the city of Wilming- ton, N. C. They .had been in stor- age for an emergency and Fire Chief Ludie Croom believes the emergency has arrived. Cannon and cannon balls keep rolling into the junk pile from all sections. Turfman Samuel D. Riddle contributed four cannons from his farm at Berlin, Md., where the scrap campaign is called "for Berlin from Berlin." Mayor Wil- liam Whaley said approvingly of Riddle's cannon: "There is plenty of misery in them yet." The Mariners' Museum near Newport News. -rolled out 150 eight-inch cannon' balls, each weighing 80 pounds. They were leftovers from the Civil War. The museum also contributed an 18th century coast defense gun that had been brought long ago from the West Indies. then go home and search their own houses from roof to cellar. Offer Prizes In Arkansas a lot of ice cream has been consumed for, through his outlet stores in that state, a Memphis ice cream manufacturer offered a pint of ice cream for each set of 1941 automobile license final approval to the measure donated to the scrap drive. j >-vr just begun. Lee is the' first county in Virginia where the teachers have gone 100 per cent; for payroll deduction for. the purchase -of war bonds and stamps. The 'movement in Lee County originated :'at St. Charles and was sponsored by 'Prof. J. Kelly Ball, principal of St. Charles high, scho'bl- with 900 students. The action was. taken at a meeting of the county teachers held at Pen-nirigton Gap and applies to the superintendent, principals' and the deadline established fa; President Roosevelt for its enact ment. Kingsport Firm Expands Business Richmond, Va. Amendmen issued Thursday by the State Cor poration Commission: Kingsport Grocery- Company, Tennessee corporation, authorizec I0-t In the. entire .county system. Markets At A Glance back at f 15.40 mark. Sheep .steady. Grains "Wlieat after early upswing. Poultry steady, (dressed) Butter; and eggs linn. its maximum authorizec capital stock from to 000. A. T. Siler, president, Wil liamsburg, Ky., filed amendment. Alarm Sounded JP The Vichjf radio resorted Friday that anti-aircraft funs, went .into action when an Uarrn was sounded at Lyon at a_m; Friday. C. K. Koffman Appointed Head Oi OCD In Area Announcement of the appoint- ment of C. K. Koffman as com- mander of the Kingsport area of civilian defense was made Thurs- __....._ day night by C. P. Edwards, war spirit. Roosevelt Makes Report Following Visits To Plants Washington JP President Roosevelt, completing Thursday a secret inspection tour of war ac- jtivities from border to border anc coast to coast, expressed the firm conviction that production was go- ing along extremely well and that the national capital was lagging far behind the rest of the country in Men Moved By Hitler From OCD coordinator, at a meeting of the the civilian defense corps held high school auditorium. Paul Scott was named to succeed Mr. Koffman as chief of auxiliary police. Surprise Blackout Around 600 volunteer wardens, policemen, firemen, and other de- fense workers from Kingsport and surrounding territory attended the meeting which was held to perfect the workings of the organization preparatory to a surprise blackout to be held next week. Speakers at the meeting included Coordinator Edwards, George An- derson, chief air raid warden, H. G. Stone, representing the indus- trial plants, Carter. Crymble, as- sistant chairman of. the education committee, and Sydney MacBeth, assistant coordinator. Most of the meeting was devoted to an open forum presided over by ilr. Koffman, during which time the audience asked question to clarify their duties and jurisdiction in an air raid. Warnings Issued Air Raid Warden' Anderson in- structed the wardens to notify their sector residents that no war- den would enter their home during blackout unless he had made plying Japanese forces from the previous arrangements to do so and main base at Buna. to warn them against opening the The Japanese have kept up door to strange people. He said strong efforts to repair the bridge, j that all persons except members of across the Kumasi river. The Allies :the civiiian defense corps were ex- have hitting at the j pected to seek shelter when the air raid signal sounded. Vehicles must be parked on the right side of the street or road, unless a parking lot is accessable. air almost constantly and it was bombed four times yesterday by flying fortresses. There was relatively little action elsewhere in the southwestern Pa- cific area. Aged Elizabethan Woman Snccumbs Elizabethton JP Excitement following discovery that her house was afire brought death from a heart attack Thursday night to Mrs. Nell Honeycutt, 66, of Eliza- bethton. A daughter, Miss Berlin Honey- cult, said she and her mother were preparing to eat supper when they heard a "popping noise" at the rear of the house.: ,They saw the house was on fire, and the daughter call- ed the fire department. While she was calling, she said, her mother collapsed. Rail Coach Ratei Raised h Soilh rates on Southeastern railroads increased to 2.2 cents a mile Thursday. The old rate of aboift cents a. mile on the Southeastern roads ended Wednesday midnight The new rate brings the fares for these carriers to the level now prevailing for the rest of the nation. Good Morning A Little Chuckle To Start the Day Nyack. mmn- news: it skunlr wu here to trace the origin of an odor so bad it made work at .the Bear Mountain Trailskle Im- possible. Official of the museum brought the skunk into the museum, then followed it as' ft' tracked' down- the odor. Source of the icent found, to be rotting meat, stored by rats ta the walls a nearby building. Stalingrad Holds; Axis Moves To Face "Second Front" (D.v The Associated Germany was using whole fresh divisions to crawl ahead in Stalin- grad's streets Thursday night in a feverish effort to make good on Hitler's promise to capture it, and from the comparatively quiet sec- tors of Russia the German sol- diery was moving back west and south to guard occupied and Axis territory against a "second front" in either Europe or Africa. Moscow's midnight communique reported the Germans had ad- vanced a little more through Stal- ingrad's northwest outskirts on the last of six attacks, but on the south of the city the Russians flung the enemy out of another populated point, the fourth recently reported reconquered. Rommel Absent Already the Allies were taking the initiative in Egypt. While the. Nazi desert commander, Marshal Erwin Rommel, was listening to der fuehrer's speech in Berlin's Sportspalast, the British Eighth Army opened an attack Wednes- day in the central sector the -Bgyptiari-rfirttfegroTind. From Berlin the Nazi propaganda was starting the preliminary ma- chinations of a great squeeze on Europe's scattered ar.d hemmed-in neutrals. Crafty Dr. Goebbels was broadcasting to Sweden, Spain, offenders .are some commentatorsjportugal and Turkey Carimarily) and columnists. (Asked to Switzerland and Eire 
                            

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