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Huron Evening Huronite Newspaper Archive: December 22, 1927 - Page 1

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Publication: Huron Evening Huronite

Location: Huron, South Dakota

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   Huron Evening Huronite (Newspaper) - December 22, 1927, Huron, South Dakota                               THE NEWSPAPER FOR CENTRAL SOUTH DAKOTA" VOLUME XLII NO. 174 HURON, SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1927 SINGLE COPY 5c HICKMAN NOW Two fee Rinks Are Planned For Huron By Christmas _______ ja rn N ALUMNI Investigate Drinking At Sioux Falls Cafes AND :s RIVER Co-operates with Col- j'eo-e and Fred Holton in providing Skating- i'or Pub- Huron is to have two ice sknt- iiiKtead of one. 'in addition to the proposed rink Athletic college field, and planned in Alumni rv Huron Reaves post of the American ihe Lesion post, in co-opera- wiih. Fred Holton, is planning the James river just north Find 15-YearOld Girl in Drunken Stupor in Snow- bank; Two Youths Arrest- ed for Furnishing Liquor. SIOUX PALLS. S. Dec. Investigation of liquor drink- ing in public places in fciioux Palls wiis in full sway today, following1 the finding of a 1.5-year old girl in a drunken stupor in a snowbank early yesterday morning, A con- ference ot authorities was held yesterday afternoon, and it was WillmiiK.. .liluted action may be taken'toward i on. lion ono on Chicago North >Vestern staff Weather permitting, it is plan- M u> have both rinks ready for rJ bv Christmas if possible, and as soon during Christmas v.H-k "H it te found Feasible. To Give First Flooding it planned today to give- tit-Id its first Hooding to- j.urjj. following the banking of the end oi" ihe field. It was thai at least four flood- would he necessary to provide VTnitable link. Those, it was be- -tvt-d by the committee from Hu- college and the Legion post, be'given by Christmas or -.via after.'if ihe u-inporauire.H are enough. The forecast i'or the part of tho week is for low temperatures. The site of Iho proposed rink on James'river r.lso depends on, of the weather. Ice cut lochiy, nnd.ajscpidi- two or three Mi-. HoUon proposed to the JUejy- !mi to Ip.'ivo tho, proposed rink site, iu sjjch coiHlition that -when- it over after the present cut- Tiiii; is done that the new ice will -n.ooth for ska The space outlined by 'Mr. Uol- is around 150 feet wide by at loot long. Posts are to be frozen into the ice and from the .su it is planned to string wir- ing so tha: the-skating space will b- inclosed. Red lights are to be i-iacoil as danger signs near where u-f it being cut on the river out- Xot Too Many rinks are not too many to all the-skaters in II.i- if.n." Chairman Tom Kuosgon of Legion committee said' today. "TluM-.-' are a good many grown- ups A ho like to skate, and the two should prove acceptable to who like skating. "We. arc more than glad to eo- oju-rnto with .Mr. Holton in- provid- rink on tho river. We are trying have both rinks ready by Christ- mas, bur. or course, much depends the weather. "'If the weather permits, we plan 10 give the Alunuii field its first flooding tonight, and the other iioodhigs -will be given just as soon as ;'m> base provided by the first ilooiliim is sufficiently hard. The- Sirs; flooding will lie given as soon the Bides and ends of the field 5 banked, and we expeet that this completed late this after- Coin utif.tee> Pleased K. C. McKenzle and A. B. Blake, i" orher two members of; the committee, also wore en- over the plans for two padlocking places where liquor drinking is flagrant. Found by Milkman While going over his route about o'clock in the morning a milk- man came upon the girl lying in a snowbank a short distance from her homo in a drunken condition. Ho carried her to the home of her parents. The girl did not regain connciou.sne.SK until noon. After a thorough investigation the local police? arrested Jimmy Mavity and Lawrence Lano, local youths. They were lodged in the city jail and are charged with fur- nishing liquor to minors. In their confessions to tho police the boys admitted being with two glrla and taking them to a local oafo Tuesday night whero they hud liquor delivered ;to them from an outside pai'.ty. They in-ed.at the cafe about 12: so o'clock antl from AvaIked to cai'e remained uutU about 3 o'clock in Clirl un Street One of gii-18, dG-yoars-okl, iii- on jjoing home'' _ home. Anqther tax antl they took the 15 year old girl home.. They did not know tho ex- act location ot her home tmt let her out where they thought she lived and Ihe'ti drove away. On regaining consciousness the girl said could not remember anything that happened after ini'd- uight. She lias appeared before tho juvenile court previous' to this affair. ALL S. D. CROPS WAS-tnXCl'TQN, Dec. estimated aggregate value ot! all farm cVopw this year was announced yesterday the department of. agricul- ture as compar- ed with last year, an increase of i. The estimate is an hypothet- ical figure based upon the re- lation "oC value of all crops to that of the 22 prlncipaKcrops as "shown by the latest census statistics. Texas led all states in the value of her crops this year, and was followed by Iowa, Cal- ifornia, Nebraska, Kansas, North Carolina and Minnesota. 'The -hypothetical value of all crops for this year by states included: North Dakota, Sou ill Dakota, '83H.OOO. MAKESAPPEAL Chicago Bread Lines Growing Daily, Report CHICAGO, Dec, lines Kiich Chicago has not seen sin.ce 1913 are growing longer as Christmas wears and as winter strikes with piercing chill through the thin-clad ranks of the jobless. "Five hundred and four in line said Captain. Fred T. Wilke'8 of the Salvation Army, "Four hundred' and eighty the day before, and 400 before that. It's bigger every day as we- get closer to Christmas. "These are only single men we have down here. The family relief department has 150 a day." "These said Captain "Willies, referring to those in the bread Line, 'are representing the skilled workers. t We can't find any jobs and the government agency thinks it has had a good.day finds four jobs." ITALY IS NOW ON GOLD BASIS Liras Established at Ratio of' Nineteen'to One Dol- lar if it PARTY PLANNED FOR BOY SCOUTS Council and Rotary Club Co- operate in Event on December 29 "Two rinks won't bo too many nreommodate all the people who to declared Mr. MteKen- 'The committee appreciates f-o-operation of Mr. Holton an providing a rink on the he Falls lias six ice rinks, why shouldn't Huron have at i'-ast Mr. Blake wanted to know. Tho Legion committee also ex- pressed its appreciation of the Hu- ron college committee for its co- operation in the use of Alumni field for an ice rink, "It's only through co-operation That most things are accomplish- declared Chairman Kuesgen. PROPERTY SOU) Uc of tho Central States Pow- and Light company of Dayen- i, Iowa, to CentralStates Util- Company of New York for announced. GIEDT CANDIDATE FOR SCHOOL JOB RUR'EKA, >.S. D.. Dec. 22. amlidacy Theodore J. P. Ciiertt of this city for the republican nom- nation for coinmiasionei'-ot achpol ind public lands was launched here today. The announcement way authorized by John Hiruing, a life-long friend oC Mr., Giedt, well known throughout the state as former head of the state, banking department. Mr. Giedt is state senator lor McPherson and Campbell counties. i-Ie also has served as clerk of courts, auditor, state's attorney, and has been in the lower house ot the legislature for McPherson county. Other public positions held by him include membership on the'state coal mining commis- advocate general in the South Dakota National Guard, mayor of Eureka and -member ot the board of education in .that -cify. Mr. Hlrning Baid Mr. Glcdt would have the solid backing of. his section of tho state, which thoHo counties in the northwestern corner of the east river region. Amounts Contributed to Aid Salvation Army Poor Below; Par Another appeal was Merchant o" the Salva- _ tipn. Arnjy to Huronians to keep j in tho town district. According to Captain Merchant, the amount placed in the so far is somewhat belo.w.that of last season, and unlesy ib> people res- pond mor.o freely. tJ'io Chrlatmas-. charity work of- t.he army wilt somewhat curtailed The amounts collected in tho kettles are 'Used ,in providing Christmas cheer for needy families, and the larger thu amounts tho mo 10 Christmas choor pro- ODAY OF MRS. F. M, DAVIS Mrs. Frank M. Davis, one of the pioneer residents of this county, died at the family residence, 464 Colorado avenue southwest, ,at an early hour this morning. Mrs. Davis has been an invalid tor six years. The funeral will be held from the Kinyon chapel Friday afternoon at o'clock. The Rev. Keteile will have charge of the services. Huron's' Boy Scouts and those who have applications for mem- pending are to be guests of the Seoul; council and the Rotary club at a party on December Tho party, which also will in- clude a "feed" will be hold in ihe Legion haU. Scout Stay ton that at least 250 boys would he in attend- ance. In addition to the invitation to boys who have Scout member- ship applications in, one has been issued to all boys who soon will be 12 years of age. ROME, Dec. 22. was on a gold basis today with, the lims established .at the ratio of nineteen to' the dollar. One gold lira will bo worth 8.0 paper lire. The decree-of (.he council of min- isters announcing the stabilization marked the culmination of a cam- paign established by Premier Mus- solini in a speech at Pesaro more Lhaii a year ago. He then started "n battle i'or the revaluation of the The stabilization was the result of negotiations by Benjamin Strong, governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York; Montague Nor- man, governor oiV the Bank of Eng- land; Donald O. Stringher, director general of tho Bank of Italy, and a group of Anglo-American bankers. AB a result two credits totaling will be opened. Tlio-stKbilizallon does not affect In the -leant various American loans made to the Italian govern- ment, several municipalities and many private concerns. Payment of interest as well as principal of these is to be made in dollars. These include a loan of made by J. P. Morgan and company after Minister of Finance Yolpi went to America to settle Italian war debts. Beaty Quits us Oil Chairman Weather Huron and Vicinity: Unset- and Friday. Slightly tonight. Fov Dnkotn: Mostly and Friday; lion northeast elou nor- NEW YORK, Dec. L. Beaty, chairman of the board of the Texas corporation, of the largest so-called independent .oil companies in the country, today announced his resignation as chairman and an a member the board of directors. Mr. Beaty had held the post chairman for two years and to that been president corporation. aft- Beaty declined to make anr statement regarding the reasons for his resignation, his secretary stating that he considered it in bad "taste" to make any announce- ment at this time. No announce- ment was made as to his successor. Order Raise in Interurban Rates here tem- charge of prior of the. WASHINGTON; Dec, 22. Declaring Its. Interurban Passenger rates into and out of Chicago and Milwaukee were unlawful, the in- commerce commission to- lay orclerecl the Chicago, North Shore and Milwaukee jajlroad raiser these on or before ruary JB to like charg- es in to W.W.HOWES TO OPEN MEET WATERTOWN, S. Doc, 22. W. Howes of Beadle county will make the principal address at the democratic state-wide meeting in Watertown on December 28, called Cor the purpose of organise, ing Billow for governor" movement, it was announced today by James F. Houlihan, chairman who has of the arrangements. Mr; Howes is democratic na- tional committeeman. Hay AS. Daugherty ot Sioux Falls, assist- ant state's attorney for Minnehaha county will also be one of the prin- cipal speakers. Tho announcement adds there will be short talks by other demo- crats of state-wide prominence to- gether with a musical program. These features will be a part of the banquet in honor of the birth- day of former President' Woodrow Wilson which will be held during the evening1. The mass meeting for open dis- cussion of the availability of Gov- ernor Bulow for re-nomination wil be held in the afternoon. The BRITAIN WON'T BOOST HER NAVY LONDON, Dec. 22. dec- laration that the British govern- ment has no intention of embark- ing upon an increase to its naval budding program despite "t.he tem- porary failure" of the Geneva nav- al conference to reach u general agreement, was the outstanding feature from'the American point of view of King George's speech pro- roguing parliament today. A section of the speech dealing with allied war debts emphasized that the policy of the government was to limit its claims on the al- lies to such an amount as together with the reparations receipts would cover the government's own war debt obligations. It was brought out that war debts funding arrange- ments had been signed by Great Britain with all the countries con- cerned except Russia. After brief sittings of both houses to dispose of certain out- standing bills, and the reading of the king's speech, parliament, was prorogued until February 2. The king declared that Great Britain would continue to base its policy on loyal cooperation with tho League. 6t Nations. INVESTIGATION REVEALS NEW FACTS CONCERNING SLAYING FIVE NABBED ON RAPID S. D.( Dec. alleged hootlegRers were arrested here last night on infor- mation furnished hy under-cover men in the employ ot K. Senn, district prohibition director, and one large sedan was confiscated, Frank Gilmore, deputy United States marshal said today. Those charged with possession and sale, are J. W. Scott, Nate Reynolds, Mrs. L. Pense and Mrs. Amos Michaels. Amos Michael is chars- 3d with possession, sale, and trans- portation. His machine was con- fiscated. It was unofficially rumored that the Senn operatives have been for three weeks, making 'buys" from the alleged bootleg- ger-s arrested last, night. Remus Must Stay in Jail for Hearing CINCINNATI, Dec. George Remus, former ''king of. topotleggerfc" Avho stands acquitted of .slaying his wife Imogene, last October 6, will remain in jail until ills sanity hearing is held in pro- bate   rriday win enjoy their first said. Doheny Justice Resigns Bench WASHINGTON, 22. Adolnli Hochling, of the Bifctrlct of Columbia su- preme 'court, who the Fall-PoliW conspiracy Cripple Kills One; Wounds Parents BRUNSWICK, MAINE, Dec. Petit, 23, insane cripple, shot and wounded his father and mother here last night was captured today, but not until be had killed Mrs. M. B. White, 78, ,in her home at Topsham, and had been critically wounded by office: s. liberty since commitment to the penitentiary, Governor Bibb Graves bag issued them Christmas paroles, each for a period of seven days, ef- fective December 23, 1XLAPAZ Coetes and Le Brix, French trans-Atlantic fliers, arrive at La Bolivia, enronte to United States, after mile flight from REPORTED SANE Board of alienists reports to Gov- ernor Smith at Albany, N. Y., Mrs. Ruth Snyder and Henry Judd Gray, condemned murderers, are saiie. ENGAGEMENT Turin. newspaper forecasts en gagement of Crown Prince Hum- bert of Italy and Princess Marie PROVINCETOWN, MASS., Dec. operations at the sunken submarine S-4 were re- sumed at this morning, the divers, being instructed to survey the position of the wreck prepara- tory to an attempt to raise it to the surface. No sounds had been heard the torpedo room the "S-4, which six men have been impris- oned since Saturday at that hour. The oscillator of the mine sweeper Falcon, flagship of tho salvage fleet, sent messages to the. S-4 at 15 minute intervals all night. When work was resumed today after a five hour suspension the air compressor of the Falcon had been forcing air into the torpedo room of the S-4 for more than 10 hours. Expert Has Hope Simon Lake, an expert in sub- marine construction sent a-radio message to the Falcon from his home at Bridgeport, Conn., during the night, stating that there should have been enough air in the torpe- do room of the S-4 to last one man 700 hours. He computed that there should have been sufficient to keep six men alive 116 -2-3 hours. The men might lit unconscious for many hours before they died, the message said. At eight o'clock this morning they" had been approxi- mately 113 hours in their steel pri- son. The first diver to descend this morning was William Wickwire, who was also the first to be low- ered yesterday. He was instructed by Commander Edward Ellsborg, In charge of diving operations, to land on the bow of the S-4, and dis- entangle an air line and. a descend- ing line which had become fouled. Ho was then to drop over the star- board side of the vessel to the bottom. To Inspect Damage The diver was to make his vray to the jstern of the S-4 to estimate how deep she was imbedded in mnA. Ha was for-er Man Thought to Have Been Killer Passes One of Ran- som Bills after Purchasing- Gloves and Underwear. CRITICIZE XAVV COTU1T, Mass., Dec. 22, criticism at the "in- activity of the navy" at the scene of the S-4 disaster and refusal of officials in charge of rescue and salvage at- tempts to give "the truth to the newspaper men11 was found in Provincetown "on every by Congressman Charles L. Gifford, of .Cotnit, Mr. Gifford said today. "They wouldn't tell the newspaper men that the sub- marine was lost. They gave out wrong stories, and the boys had to resort to speculat- ing in many cases. The rope attached to the submarine never should have become detached or broke, causing yesterday's delay. They could have worked all day yester- day. They could have worked the day before, ward on the starboard side to in- spect the damage there and to see how the keel was resting. Wickwire was warned to avoid the diving rudders of the submar- ine which are opened because she was submerged when struck by the coastguard destroyer Paulding on Saturday. He also was told to give the hole in her hull on the starboard side forward .'of the con- ning tower a wide berth. A second diver was to go down when Wickwire had carried out his assignment. He was carry out the same orders on the port side of the vessel. Commander Ellsborg, who made several trips down to the submarine S-51 when he had charge of the salvaging of that vessel off Block Island two years planned to put on a div- er's suit later fn the day and make a personal inspection of the S-4. Rear Admiral Frank H. Brum- by, in charge of salvage operations of the sunken submarine, admitted at 11 o'clock today that there was no longer hope that life existed on board the submarine. "I have not the slightest doubt that there is no life on the Admiral Brumby said. Commander Ellsborg said this morning that divers had reached much wreckage from the Paulding on the forward deck of the sub- marine. This included several frames, two ribs, plating and part of the keel. The bottom of the Pauldlng's hull cut a hole in the deck of the submarine from a point just aft of the forward gun to a point back of the conning tow- SEATTLE, WasliM Dec. (A'3) New impetus to the quest for William Edward- 11 Ickiuan, sought as the slayer -of Marian Parker oi Los Angeles, wiis tt'lven today by (lie report from. the Y alley garage at Kent, 15 miles south of liefe tlint iin- other of the hills Included in the ransom money had Mcen rewiiyed there. On ni employees saM Jhe bill hud been presented by a motorist; between m. jind midnight last night. Slier- iff Claude 0. llnitnick patched deputies to Kent. The said the motorist ;was driving- a irrecn Hudson' sedun bearing the California license number of the ear reported stolen .by llfckman in Los Angeles last; 8inulav night. 'SEATTLE, WASH. Doc. Belief that William Edward Hiekman, accused abductor and slayer of little Marian Parker In Los Angeles, had eluded tho hast- ily drawn pol.ico net set for him.. here and had headed for Cahada, was admitted by officers hero today after a night of search for the 'youthful fugitive. searciv'-for the fiend who nVutilated tho little daughter oC d tho torn body almost at the feet of tho distracted father after receiving switched from. California to the state of Washington with electrical suddenness last night when the ex- cited haberdasher showed the pol- ice a bill identified as one ot those which Parker had given tha kidnaper. Slips Into ISiglit Seattle's police force of. 600 was mobilized and set on the trail only a few minutes after the suspected youth made a purchase at the cloth- ing store and slipped into tho night. t Feverishly the police hunted, be- lu-vlng that their quarry was head- for tli e Canadian lino or a ship bound -or the Orient. 'V-c clue wan riiguHed as the lio'Swt ant -has t. n covered tho search beuan. belie -o that if tha youth cc-.r.jr.ii'.'a tn lonvo a trail of bills he cannot evade cr.jjture. The kidnaper had 15 of. the bills, the. numbers of which, have been broadcast. The entered a haberdash- ery in the heart the downtown at last bought a pair of black gloves and a suit of underwear, gave QUO oC the bills in payment. Itecogntaed Slayer The proprietor, alone in the store said lie immediately recognized stranger as the Los Angeles fugi- tive from newspaper photographs. The suspect, who appeared tired and worn put tho gloves on while the underwear was wrapped. Then he pulled from a pocket a gold certificate, gave it to the proprie- toV, who placed it in the cash reg- ister and made change. The young. man walked out. The haberdasher immediately took the bill from the register and, telephoned Captain William Kent, chief of detectives. tt "What are tho serial numbers, asked captain Kent, "on those bills that were paid to tho Los Angeles kidnaper by the fath- er ot the girl he >'u inner Tally Kent gave the numbers. A mo- ment. oC silence ensued. the haberdasher replied excitedly, "Hiekman has just left my store." On the bill which the store pro- prietor received from his custom- er was the number K-68016970. The exact location of the haber- dashery store and the name of tho proprietor were not made known. Possible revenge upon the proprie- tor was given as the reason for withholding his name and that of. the store. t Several hundred copies oi a newspaper containing photographs of t.he fugitive were obtained by police for distribution to hotels and lodging houses. The numbers of tho bills given Hiekman by Parker were K- 08016901 to K-68016975 inclusive. COLD TRAILS LOS ANGELES, Dec. Southern California officers have been following what now ap- pears to have been cold trails m the hunt lor William Edward Hick- man, accused "fox" lit. the -kidnap- ing and slaying of little (Continued on page four) who   

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