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Huron Dakota Huronite Newspaper Archive: April 29, 1909 - Page 1

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Publication: Huron Dakota Huronite

Location: Huron, South Dakota

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   Dakota Huronite, The (Newspaper) - April 29, 1909, Huron, South Dakota                                VOL. zzvm. HURON, SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 1909. IETHRONED BY HIS SUBJECTS [niton of Turkey Succeeded by His Brother. (DHL flAMID A PRISONER lehemmed Reechad Effendl Now Oc- cupies the With Progress of Popular Govern- ment Given as Reason for Changing Alive With I Excitement Constantinople, _ April I II.. sultan' of Turkey, was de- ssert from the throne of the Ottoman Dire by his subjp.-ts for hlg Inter- jrerce with the progress of popular 3vornmont under the constitution anted by last July and his ether, Mf-hemmod Rosnhad Effendl, DW occupips the tlirone. I This change was decided upon by pe national assembly without a dls- bntlng voice and It was carried out [1th the utmost rapidity. The sultan now a prisoner in the hands of the oung Turks and carefully guarded his captors. [The formal decree removing Abdul Jam Id from all power of the Turkish aplre Issued by the Sheik Ul Islam, le head of the church, is tho regu- Ir form prescribed by the tenets of le Mohammedan faith. (The city of Constantinople Is alive llth excitement and throngs of the pnulace fill the streets. A number arrests have been made, but the (lange of sovereigns has been effect- without disorder of any kind. A. salute of 101 guns announcing of the reign of Abdul Hamid anc. Pe beginning of that of Mehomraed eschad Effendl was fired. lUSSIAN OFFICIALS ANXIOUS and Massacre May Result In Intervention. April Rus- governmcnt Is far more anxious j'Cr tho occurrences In Asiatic Tur- than over the political events at stantlnople, for it Is feared that re rioting and massacring east of Bosphorus may bring about the esslty of foreign Intervention. Ills question has not yet been raised, kt there is nothing to guarantee that J will not come up In the Immediate Iture. to the latest advices re- lived here from Constantinople It ould apear that the adherents of the regime In Turkey are determined continue the struggle. Seeing no lance of success in Constantinople are kindling racial and fanatical sslons in Asia Minor and thus ere- jing danger to Europeans in the be- pf that foreign ships will be forced land detachments on Turkish soil, Irtlcularly if the massacres at tana and elsewhere can be con- CHOKER ON HIS WAY HOME Pleased With American Visit H For Ireland. New York, April on tht Lusltanla today was Richard Croker ioraer letder of Tammany Hall, who Is bound for his home in Ireland. Be- fore sailing Mr. Croker expressed his delight with his stay hero of sevcra months, during which be visited Palm Beach, Fla.; Washington and othei RICHARD CROKER. places. His visit to the national cap- ital was marked by a call at the White House. Mr. Croker declared his Intention of returning to this city In tho fall, but disclaimed any Idea of participat- ing in the coming municipal cam- paign. NEW TRIAL DENIED IN COOPER CASE Slayers of Senator Garntack Will Take an Appeal. Nashville, Tenn., April Judge William M. Hart overruled the motion for a new trial In the case of Colonel Duncan B. and Robin J. Cooper, re- cently convicted of the murder of for- mer United States Senator E. W. Car- mack. The defense at once gave no- tice of an appeal to the supreme court and waived the formal sentence of twenty years In the penitentiary. The defendants were in court early, Mrs. Lucius Burch coming tn with her father and brother. The colonel was attired In a new black suit and ap- peared in excellent spirits. pale and 111 at ease. Robin was DUPES FOUND CUT HIS GRIME Van Vlissengen Testifies in Bankruptcy Court SENSATION IN CHICAGO "'i Kan Confused to Forgery ol Mortgages to the Extent of On: Million Dollars Declares Two Per- sons Who Held His Paper Were Partially Reimbursed by Him Four Years Ago. Chicago, April Van Vlls- eengen, whoso confession last winter to the forgery of mortgages to the extent caused 'a great BcnsnUou In Chicago, .where he hud been known ,for twenty years as a leading real estate man, exploded a bomb shell in the bankruptcy court here when he stated that his confes slon a few monthu ago was antedated by four years.by a confession reade prlvatery to men who held of als spurious paper. Van confession and' bis conviction ou a plea of guilty last winter all occurred within twenty- four hours. HeYwas brought back to Chicago from prison to testify before Hoicrne in Bankruptcy Frank L. Wean, who is attempting to locate the valid of tho prisoner. Aran Vlissengen declared that In 1004 he was-compelled to confess to Maurice Roeonfold, at that time a di- rector of the now dofunct Chicago National bank, and Bernard Rosen- berg, a real estate dealer, that the mortgages held by them and valued at had been forged. "They discovered some Irregulari- ties In the paper in that said the witness, "and came to my offlco for a conference." Admitted the Forgeries. "I admitted tbe forgeries" and said: 'I will go before the state's attorney, tell him Just what I have related to you gentlemen about these wholesale SPECIAL GRAND JURY MEETS Will Thoroughly Investigate ,Okla homa Lynching. Ada, April special; grand Jury ordered by Governor Has- koll to investigate lynching here on April of 'James Miller; Jesse West, 'Joseph Allen and W. T. Bur- tell, the cattlemen, for the murder ol A. Ai Bobbltt. a United States deputy marshal, convened here. Attorney conduct the exam- ination of witnesses. 200 witnesses have been summoned and every effort will be, It is said, made to obtain Indictments against tha leaders of the mob. There ias been talk of another lynching. This talk centered1 around fact. that Oscar, Teller and Ed- ward and David three of whom "were, taken to Tecumseh Jail for safe keeping Mreral days ago, have .been to Ada. Peller, who la a young boy. Is being held as an'alleged'accessory to the murder of Bobbltt and It 'was bis con- fession that is belferoicto have been the primary cause-of the lynching of the quartette of cattlemen. The John- son broth era are. charged with the brutal murder of L H. Putnam at Allen last January, and up to this time there baa boon no trial in their case. WAS IN NATURE OF A BRIBE Disorders in Asia Minor. April LIberte pub- lies a dispatch from Constantinople ing that although Schefket Pasha, nmander of the Young Turk forces, announced his ability to restore ier in-Asia Minor the latest reports beyond the Bosphorus, are all ling. The whole of Anatolia given over to, the" passions: of la mob.. Sultan Reported Dead. (London, April 'dispatch re- lived from Constantinople by a news tency says rumors are current in the >rklsh capital that .Abdul Mamid is The troops who are said to i taken htm from the palace.found unconscious on the floor In an r room of yie NTING FOR SMALL GAME llonel-. RooMJyelt and Son Having Some tuectst, East Africa, April Roosevelt and his son alt had sufficiently.., recovered, tho fatigue connected with their' shooting .trips and: their .Journey: Kapltl-J Plains station to the of Sir Alfred Pease on the Athi out shootlni; for small were successful In so- a gaielle-and a hattebeeste. Governor of Georgia Criticises Offer of Harriman. Amerlcus. Ga., April re- rant offer of E. H. Harrlman to spend on his Georgia railroads It the legislature would repeal certaii laws was denounced by Governo: Hoko Smith in nn address before th board of trade. Governor Smith d- clarcd the offer was in the nature r a bribe and that Harriman evident thought was enough to pr. for tbe privilege of doing as he plea? in Georgia. "We said the governor, "t; investment of foreign capital in Geor gla, but it must not take from tli-> state excessive rates of Interest I" that event it would impoverish rathei than enrich the state. "We would pleased to see Mr Harriman Improve his property. He make a good "investment by doing so, but we cannot change the policies of the state at his blddtag. "The railroads once controlled politics in Georgia, .but the people control now, and Mr. Harriman might just as well realize It He will gel Justice'in Georgia no more, no less, forgeries, plead guilty and go to prison like a man.' "We had another conference soon continued the witness. "Final- ly I proposed to settle with them. I promised to pay them from to a week. Altogether ultimately I paid them approximately Maurice Rosenfeld Is a well known capitalist and real estate dealer.' Ha has been engaged In the real estate business In Chicago since 1887. He was a director of the Chicago Na- tional bank and tho Homo Savings bank. two.of the John R. Walsh Insti- tutions which failed some years ago. He was vice president ot the United Hebrew Charities and a director of the Chicago Relief and Aid society. In 1900 he served a term as county commissioner and Is a 'prominent member of the Standard club. Bernard Rosenberg likewise has been prominent in the real estate business and in Jewish society circles for many years. whether he' nothing." invests ci pRotlred Officer Dies at 8ea. .York. April Gen- I'r John Breckenrldge' Babcbck, _U. retlredi died at'sea on board the ner Prinz Frlederith Wflhelm :arrived here..from Bremen, aabcdck-had-beiii rtfme. Gemiral Babcock was born Louisiana in 1843. He served In York regiments during the of the Civil War. Shot by Alleged Burglar. Ga.. April Rutherford, assistant postmaster at Lenox, was shot and'killed by a sup- .-posed nogro burglar, who had robbed the postoffice, two stores j and a bank. Rutherford'went to the depot waiting room to help arrest the burglar. He struck a match'to look Jntp-tne room 'when a-negro inside flred. 'twice. i .1.- .1 Train Strides Speeding Auto. Chicago, April automobile containing merchants from near- by towns was struck-''by a Chicago and Northwestern'' railroad suburban .train near Elmhurnt; IlLV resulting In the death of one'man and the severe injury of the four others In tbe ma- chine. Explosion on. Submarine.; Naples, April explosion oc- curred on the submarine'1' boat- seven men being killed und -several BAKERS DENOUNCE PATTEN 8ay. He Brought Despair to Many Poor Men's Homes. New York, April Journey- men Bakers and Confectioners' Inter- national union has Issued an official denunciation of James A. Patten be- cause of his dealings in the wheat market and blaming him for the pres- ent hard times the bakers' are suffer- ing. The protest In part reads: "He Imposed a tax upon this nation which no legislature would have dared to inflict by purchasing all the avail- able supply of wheat and purposely holding it back until he could realize an., extortionate price "for it This brought despair to ninny a poor man's .home." PERSONS INJURED Tornado Does Great Damage at trahoma, Okla.' Oklahoma City. Okla., April Sixteen persons were injured, one perhaps In a tornado i which destroyed a1 large part of the town of. Centrahoma, near, ,Not a bufldlng (In the. town remains wholly (Intact. Twelve buildings, 'in- cluding the Methodist, Baptist and Presbyterian churches, we.ro' totally wrecked. 'The town contains about 800 Inhabitants. Many 'aru homelessi TO PAY EXPENSES OF TAFT'S WESTERN TRIP Congressman Tawney Will Intro- duce Appropriation Bill. Washington, April tive Tawney, chairman of the house committee on appropriation's, talked with the president about the latter's plans for an extensive tour through the West late this summer and at the conclusion of the Interview said ho would'place a bill before the house appropriating for the presi- dent's traveling expenses during the coming fiscal year. Tawney said a false Impression had gotten abroad that be was opposed to such a meas- ure. .He said he did not know, until now definitely that President Taft sired to go West In the summer and to take a run up to por- tion of United States 'territory on which Mr. Taft has not yet sot foot. No president of the United States has ever visited Alaska In fact and Mr. Taft is anxious to learn at firsthand Just what conditions are In 'that Far Northern territory. Mr. said that he had no doubt the meaiiure he proposed would pass tho house with- out objection. If unanimous consent could not be secured, however, the bill could be called up under a special rule. Already In the senate several to set aside for the president's traveling expenses are pending and no trouble is expected in getting the appropriation through that body. ATTORNEYS IN HOT WRANGLE Nearly Come to Blows in Sao Francisco Case. HENEY LOSES HIS TEMPER Prosecuting Attorney Vigorously Re- sents What He Characterizes as Continual Assaults Upon Him. Maintains He Stood 8uoh Tactics for Months but Is Determined to Put an End to It San Francisco, April "I never take any notice of a barking said Francis J. Honey Lewis F. Tiyington in the trial here of Patrick Calhoun, president of the United Rail- "I may be a said Byington, rls Ing to his feet, "but I am not a trail- lag dog as you are." Judge Lawtar Intervened as the at- torneys stepped toward one another and warned the combatants.1 Thereupon Mr. Heney said: "I do not Intend to be assailed by any per- NO. 52: HAD BFEN ILL SOME.WEEKS Former Congressman Joseph WJ. Babcock Dead. Washington, April Rep- resentative Joseph W. Babcock oE Wisconsin, for fourteen years mem- ber tho lower house of congress- and for many years chairman of the national Republican congressional committee, died at his home here. He was fifty-nine years old. He had beets 111 for some weeks with a tlon of liver and kidney troubled. Mr. Babcock was known the yeoman work he informed; for the. election of Republican ria- gressmen as chairman of the TV Tjubv licaa congressional committee. He was regarded among his colleagues when he was In the house as one oC the shrewdest politicians in ,As chairman' of the Republican coir- gresslonal committee Mr. Babcock managed six congressional campaigns for the election of a Republican ho 'not one of which did he lose. Mr. Babcock was an ardent chamv plpn of the nattomtl' capital and ch'alrmnn for many years of the house- committee on the District of Columbia ho worked with great for :an.v movement looking to tl.c iirr' taent of this city. AMERICAN NAVY NOT _ TO British Admiralty Dote Two? Power Standard. a Explosion Destroys Plant Fond du' warehouse and1'finishing -plant iof the Winnebtigo Furniture company was destroyed by a boiler explosion. Loss. As-a result of tbe explosion every window In, courthouse was broken. A 'portion -of the boiler was two-blocks and.In the .flight 1 cut off tin electric GRAND MARATHON ON MAYS Puree of to Be Divided In New York City. New York. April grand international Marathon raco" is announced for May 8 at the Polo grounds in this' city. The promoters say It is for the championship of the world. St Yves, the Frenchman who won the derby; Simpson, the Indian; Dorando, Muloney and Orphee and Clbbt, the winners of tho recent six days go-as-you-pleaie'race In Madison alreiidy entered. The management expectil that Pat White of Carvajal of Cuba. Fred Appleby, the Englishman who twice defeated Shrubb; Svanborg, the Swede; Johnny Hayes, Tom Long- boat and Shrubb will also enter. It Is announced that the "will be to the winner, then In order of; the finish and Guilty of Robbing Poitoffices. Greenville. S. C., April Barton, on trial here for. postoffice robberies at several places In the state, surprised everybody by' plead- ing guilty In federal court The court sentenced him to five years' Imprison- ment In the federal prison at: Atlanta and FRANCIS J. HENEY. son engaged In this case. I stood It for months when I was opposed by Henry Ach. but. so help mo God, I will not stand for It again." The outburst marked the end of nn argument relating to admission of tes- timony given by Gallagher on redirect examination. London, April 28 Answering? Question in the house of commons aic to whether It was the policy ot the- government to take into consideration the American navy when estimating; the number of ships necessary to- Great Urltlan to maintain a fleet Ifr per cent more powerful than the com- bined fleets of any other two powers, a formula known as tho "two power- Reginald McKenna. first: lord of the admiralty, vsald tail was; an academic question as under exist- ing conditions the navy of the United? States for practical -purposes ot the- two power standard as defined In the speeches of Premier Asaulth woulut not enter Into account. Asked further If it was not a moot point whether America was not at, 'the present moment the world's ond strongest naval power Mr. Mo- Kenna replied: "Tinder the two power standard as defined by Mr. Asqulth the American-, navy is not to be so KILLS YOUNG BUSINESS MAN Girl Ball Game- Results Fatally. Lamonl. In., April Da Long, a high school student, .Injured white playing baseball here Saturday., la dead.. Lamoni and Mount Ayr high school teams were the 'contestants and De Lonp played second base. He collided wltli' a base runner; bursting a' blood vessel Wounds Daughter's S'wcetheart. Tenri..- "April Thompson, t wenty: years of age, was shot 'and per haps, fatally by a farmer...whose, home Is near' here. It IB claimed that Thompson was attempting 
                            

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