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Huron Dakota Huronite: Thursday, June 18, 1908 - Page 1

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   Dakota Huronite, The (Newspaper) - June 18, 1908, Huron, South Dakota                                Dakota VJ VOL. XXVIII. HURON, SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 1908. HO. 7 OUTLINEOFPLATFORM Principal Planks as Submitted to Resolutions Committee. BITTER FIGHT IS PROBABLE Anti-Injunction, Railroad Regulation and Proposed Amendment of Sher- man Anti-Trust Law Meets With Strong Opposition. Chicago, June principal planks in the platform as prepared for submission to the resolutions commit- tee of the Republican national con- vention are as follows, covering rail- road regulation, revision of the tariff, anti-Injunction, the trust question and currency reform: "We approve tho enactment of n railroad rate law and a vigorous en- forcement of the present administra- tion of the statutes against rebates and discrimination as a result of which the advantages formerly pos- sessed by the large over the smaller ihipper have substantially disappeared. In this connection we commend the appropriation of by the pres- ent congress In order to enable the Interstate commerce commission to thoroughly Investigate and give pub- licity to the accounts of interstate roads. "We believe, however, that the In- terstate commerce law should be fur- ther amended so as to give railroads the right to make and publish traffic agreements subject to the approval of the commission, but maintaining al- weys the principal of competition be- tween naturally competing lines and avoiding the common control of such lines by any means whatsoever and we specially favor the enactment of such legislation as will provide for federal restriction against the over- Issue of stocks and bonds by Interstate carriers. For Revision of the Tariff. "The Republican party declares un- equivocally for a revision of the tariff by a special session of congress im- mediately following the inauguration of the next president and commends the steps already taken to this end in the work assigned to the appropriate committees of the two houses, which are now investigating the operation and effect of existing schedules. In all tariff legislation the true principle of protection is best maintained by the imposition of such duties as will equal the difference between the cost of pro- duction at home and abroad, together with a reasonable profit to American Industrie? and the benefits that follow are best secured by the establishment of maximum and minimum rates, which shall be applied automatically to the trade of other countries in ac- cordance with their treatment of our trade. "The minimum should represent the normal measure of protection re- quired for the benefit of our own In- dustries. The aim and purpose of the Republican policy is not only to pre- serve, without excessive duties, that security against foreign competition to which American manufacturers, farmers and producers are entitled, hut also to maintain the high standard of living of the wage earners of this country who are more direct benefi- ciaries of the protective system. Be- tween the United States and the Phil- ippines we believe in a free inter- change of products, with such limita- tions as to sugar and tobacco as will avoid injury to domestic interests. Regarding Writ of Injunction. "We declare for such an amendment of the statutes of procedure In the fed- eral courts with respect to the use of the writ of Injunction as will on the one band prevent the summary issue of such orders without proper consid- eration, and on the other will preserve undimlnlshed the power of courts to enforce their process, to the end that justice may be done at all times and to all parties." The trust plank is as follows: "The Republican party passed the Sherman anti-trust law over Demo- cratic 'opposition and enforced it after Democratic dereliction. It has been a wholesome instrument for good in the hands of a wise and fearless ad- ministration. But experience has shown that its effectiveness can be strengthened and its real objects bet- ter attained by such amendments as' will give to the federal government greater supervision and control over, and secure greater publicity in, the management of that class of Interstate corporations having power and oppor- tunity to effect monopolies, and at the same time will not Interfere with the existence of associations among busi- ness men, farmers and wage earners so long as their conduct or operation results In a positive benefit to the pub- lic." The currency plank contains this language: "The Republican party approves'the Aldrich-Vreeland currency bill, but only as an emergency measure. We declare for a thorough and new sys- tem of currency laws that will be In accord with the need of tho times and which will be more adapted to the demands of business and more olastlc in its character as a circulating nio- dlum." BIG FIGHT OF CONVENTION Strong Opposition to Anti-Injunction Plank. Chicago, June injunction plank of the tentative Republican platform looms up as the subject of the big fight of the convention. The preparation for the contest has been going on unceasingly for two days and nights and the lines are now rapidly closing up for the supreme test of strength. Those who favor the planl: are more and more convinced of tho supreme necessity for its incorpora- tion In the platform, while thcso who oppose It ore making every prepara- tion to carry tho struggle to the floor cf the convention In the event of fail- ure to eliminate tho plank in the reso- lutions committee. To fall to say that the Republican party Is in favor of the reasonable use of the Injunction would be omitting the necessary answer to the charge which is anticipated In the campaign that Secretary Tall Is the father of the ir.jvnrMon end approves its rad- ical as well as Its conservative use. Vv'btM the resolutions committee holds its fir-it It Is planned to refer the anti-injunction plank to a sub-committee. The [irogramnio of consideration in the sub-committee ia to hold a series of hearings and allow all Interested persons to present their arguments. There seems no doubt of the power of the Taft forces to organ- ize the committee and name thu sub- committee nnd It Is likely that a fa- vorable report will be made on the plank, perhaps in a modified form, to the full committee and then will fol- low the report to the convention, with possibility of a minority report. There are other planks of the plat- form which will also give trouble. These are the railroad plank, which includes a declaration in favor of supervision of the Issuance in the fu ture of stocks nnd bonds by interstate corporations, and the trust plank, or proposed amendment to the Sherman anti-trust law for the purpose of re- lieving trades unions, farmers' organ- izations and kindred aggregations of persons from the implication of being illegal because of their very existence. The postal savings bank plank will be vigorously opposed by banking In- terests. On all of these propositions the plan now Is to open the doors of the sub-committee for the presenta- tion of facts on these subjects. INTEREST GROWS HOURLY Vice Presidential Question Remains Unsettled. Chicago, June grows hourly in the vice presidential situa- tion and it has been augmented by the conflicting reports regarding the pref- erence of the president and Secretary Taft on this subject nnd the effect upon the political situation in Indiana and Iowa of the possible nomination of Vice President Fairbanks and Sen- ator Dolliver. The peculiar conditions In the New York state delegation, a considerable proportion of which is avowedly in favor of the nomination of Represen- tative James S. Sherman of Utlca, and the sentiment, especially among delegates from several of the New England states, to the effect that the ticket would gain strength from the nomination of a New York state man, has complicated a situation which might otherwise have been far more simple. The name of ex-Mayor Seth Low. of New York was mentioned in connection with the and there is still talk centering about that of Secretary of the Treasury Cortel- you, but the liveliest interest among the New York delegates and others favoring the selection of a New York man is in the candidacy of Represen- tative Sherman. Pledged to Support Hughcts. Yet New York is pledged, both by the action of its state and the majority of its district conventions and by the unanimous vote of its caucus, to press Governor Charles J3. Hughes for the presidential nom.nation. Both the Hughes and anti-Hughes men in the delegation realize the absurdity of a claim even by the Empire state of both places on the ticket at the same time. Telegrams exchanged between Representative Herbert Parsons of New York and the governor made it plain that no act of the latter would result In the withdrawal of the gov- ernor's name before the close of the first ballot at least and both elements in the delegation have concluded that before Mr. Sherman's name can be properly breached for the vice presi- dential nomination the candidacy of Governor Hughes must be definitely disposed of. Meanwhile Governor Guild of Massa- chusetts, Governor Sheldon of Ne- braska ex-Governor Murphy of New Jersey, John Hoys Hammond of Bos- ton, George A. Knight of California and others, are more or less active candidates and on the surface at least the vice presidential situation is full of uncertainties out of which almost any some "dark might emerge at last triumphant. SECOND PLACE President Desires Nomination of Dolliver or Cummins, FORMER'S FRIENDS OBJECT Iowa Delegation Will Oppose Nomina- tion of Senator Even In the Face of the Administration's Declared Pref- erence for Him. Chicago, June new turn was given to the vice presidential specula- tion shortly after noon -when an in- timation was received from Washing- ton that the president desired the nomination of either Senator Dolliver or Governor Cummins. The Iowa friends of the senator were greatly surprised by the announcement, but wore unmoved by it and Chairman Perkins of the Iowa delegation ex- pressed the opinion that Iowa would oppose Mr. Dolllver's selection even 'in face of the president's preference for him. "We cannot consent to his nomina- be said, and he added that this CONGRESSMAN SHERMAN. Now Yorker Is prominently men- tioned for second place on the Repub- lican ticket. decision was as much in Senator Dol- llver's interest as in the interest of the state and the party. The AIllson-Dolllver delegates from Iowa do not take any more kindly to the suggest Ion said to emanate from the White House at Washington that Governor Cummins might be nom- inated for vice president than that Senator Dolliver might be given the plac-3, but their reasons are different. They do not take kindly to the idea of conferring this honor upon Cum- mins and they say that if nominated many members of this faction would on that account refuse to support the national ticket. IOWA MEN VERY ACTIVE, Oppose Plan to Nominate Dolliver for Vice President. Chicago, June Is an ap- preciable falling off in the talk of Sen- ator Dolliver for vice president. The Iowa men who are opposing his nom- ination were out early and giving their undivided attention to heading off the boom of their senator. They were soon joined by former Secretary of the Treasury Shaw, who sought out Senator Long before the latter had fin- ished his breakfast and immediately began a vigorous remonstrance against further efforts in Dolllver's behalf. He went directly to the point. "You don't want another La Folleite in the senate, do he asked. "Well, he added, "don't open the way for sending Cummins to the senate, as you will do if you cause Dolliver to vacate his seat there. he went on, "we might vote for Dol- liver if be were nominated, but we are going to see to it that be is not nom- inated; it must not be." With Dolliver out of the way the contest narrows practically to Fair- hanks and Sherman, with Fairbanks declaring emphatically over the long distance telephone that he will not ac- cept second place if tendered him. California Has a Candidate. Chicago, June movement was sprung among the California delegates for the nomination of George A. Knight of San Francisco for vice pres- ident. Several of the leading Repub- licans of the state have been urging upon Mr. Knight to enter the race, but the latter has not yet given consent to the use of his name. His backers, however, say they will not wait upon this, but will go ahead and launch his boom. They say they will be able to line up practically all of the Western delegations behind Knight and to pre- sent a formidable front in the con- vention. New York. If it is thought that the nomination ought to go to the West let us pick out some bright young man in the Pacific states who could be relied upon to make a good campaign." Senator Borah Declares lowan the Best Man for Second Place. HOME DELEGATION DIVIDED Some of the Hawkeye Delegates at Chicago Bitter In Denunciation of the Governor of Their State and Will Oppose His Nomination. Chicago, June sharp upon the announcement from Wash- ington that the president and Secre- tary Taft -were inclined to Insist that the vice presidential candidate must come from Iowa and that they would he satisfied with either Senator Dol- liver or Governor Cummins a boom was formally launched for Governor Cummins. It was fathered by Sen- ator Borah of Idaho, who was in tele- phonic communication with potent Washington friends of the Iowa gov- ernor. As soon as he came out ot the telephone booth he announced his ad- vocacy of tho Cummins candidacy mid started out with real Western energy to promote the new boom. The move is significant in view of the fact that Mr. Borah has been I among the most ardent of Senator Dol- liver's supporters. He now soys he Is convinced that of the two men Mr. Cummins Is the more available and declares he can carry ti much larger vote in the Far West than any other man. i According to George D. former director of the mint and one of the Iowa men prominent in the move- ment to steer the vice presidential nomination away from Senator Dol- liver, the Iowa delegation will give its undivided support to Governor Cum- mins for second place on the national ticket When it was reported from Washington that Secretary Taft 'was said to favor the nomination of Cum- mins for vice president Mr. Roberts said: "The Iowa delegation would bo sat-! isfied with the nomination of Governor Cummins. I believe thut it would be a good solution of the Iowa contro- versy. Iowa would feel honored if the vice presidency should be given to that state, but as friends of Dolliver, who is still a young mnn in the sen- ate with a "bright future before him, we felt bound to protect against his being offered up as a sacrifice." When the statement by Mr. Roberts was shown to Colonel Lafayette Young of Des Molnes, one of the Iowa dele- gates at large, he said that Mr. Rob- erts "does not live in Iowa; he lives in Illinois." He expressed disapproval of any movement to "recognize" Cum-. mins on the national ticket and added: "He might be nominated on a ticket with Bryan, but certainly not on the j Republican ticket." ENDORSED BY MINNESOTA Kellogg Now a Full Fledged Candi- date for Vice President. Chicago, June B. Kel-! logg is now a full fledged candidate for vice president. At any rate the Minnesota delegation thinks he is, for It endorsed him for the place. Mr. Kellogg protested mildly, but it availed him nothing. This action was taken when the del- egation met to ratify tho organization slate. The motion to endorse was made by W. W. Heffelflnger of Min- neapolis and was seconded by several of the delegates. In muking the mo- tion Mr. Heffelflnger sold Minnesota had an opportunity to secure this honor and he knew of no one more entitled to it than Mr. Kellogg. Mr. Kellogg's principal protest against the endorsement was that he was not a candidate and did not want to be understood as seeking the place. While a protest it was not of the posi- tive kind and it leaves the members of the delegation In to push his candidacy without interference. Mr. Kellogg said it was an honor that he appreciated; should the office come to him he declared that he would be further honored, hut he was frank enough to state that he did not believe the nomination would come to Minnesota. NEW YORK MEN CAUCUS. No Mention of the Vice Presidency at Meeting. Chicago, June har- monious, so far as surface indications went, characterized the caucus of the New York delegation. For tho first time in modern politics in that state United States Senator Thomas C. Platt of Tioga county was not in attendance, his place being token by State Sen- ator J. P. Aids of Norwich. United States Senator Chauncey M. Depow chosen as the state's representa- tive in the list of honorary vice presi- dents. The conflict which existed over the membership on the committee on resolutions between Representative Sereno E. Payne of Auburn and Rep- resentative Herbert Parsons of New York had been settled and Mr. Par- sons himself presented Mr. Payne's name for the place. State Chairman Timothy L. vVoodruff of Brooklyn was made chairman of the delegation and William L. Word of Westchester was re-elected member of the national com- mittee. A resolution was adopted unani- mously, on motion of Representative Parsons, requesting General Stewart L. Woodford, as head of the delegation at large, to present the name of Gov- ernor Hughes as the choice of the state for president. There was no mention of the vice presidency, nor of any of the New York state men whose names have been mentioned In that connection. Congressman Herbert Parsons sent a sharp telegram to Governor Hughes in which he said that the nomination of Secretary Taft was now practically assured and that Governor Hughes was practically out of the running. He advised the governor that there was a general feeling that Now York would be accorded-the vice presidency If a suitable name wore presented from that state, but that so long as the delegation was bound by their obligation to Governor Hughes It was Impotent to secure the recognition to which it was believed New York was entitled. USED AS SAVINGS BANKS Postoffices Hold Eight Millions of Pub- lic Money. Washington, June post- offices of the country have come to be, to a extent tl'in would be supposed, tcviurs for the peo- ple. This fact lies teen brought out as a result of Inquliles by the depart- ment officials. Recently the third assistant post- master general asked every tlrst and second class postmaster In the United States for Information relative to the money ordors that had been sold for savings purposes during the year end- ed Feb. 29, 1908. The returns from these Inquiries show that money orders, aggregating were purchased during the year at first and second class postoffices for savings purposes by patrons hav- ing tho money orders made payable to themselves. The savings bank bill Introduced In the senate by Senator Carter, which has been made a special order for Dec. 14 next, is said to embody the ideas of Postmaster General Meyer on the subject. DOLLIVER FOR FAIRBANKS Iowa Man Favors Renomlnation of Vice President. Chicago, June D. Per- kins, chairman of the Iowa delegation, has received the following from Sen- ator Dolliver expressing his opinion that Vice President Fairbanks should be renomlnated: "I think Mr. Fairbanks ought to be renominated in case Taft shall be chosen. Mr. Fairbanks has sacrificed his active relations with public life by accepting the office of vice presi- dent and no man in the history of the government has proved 110 satis factory as a presiding officer in the senate. If bo is not available it looks to me as if we ought to find sorna ntrocg man in WILL KEEP OUT OF FIGHT Taft Men Have No Preference for Vice President. Chicago, June view of the continued intimation that the Taft forces bad a preference for the office of vice president a conference was held in the rooms of Myron T. Herrlck of Ohio. There were present Messrs. Henry Taft, Arthur I. Vorys, Frank H. Hitchcock and other friends of Secre- tary Taft. After full consideration of the subject they announced for pub- lication that under no circumstances would Secretary Taft or any of his friends take any part in the contest for vice that they pur- posed to devote themselves to the nomination of their candidate and that they would make no effort whatever to influence the decision of the con- vention upon the vice presidency. Pickpockets Make Big Haul. St. Paul, June C. Taylor of St. Paul and Seattle was robbed of about In cash and securities which he carried In the Inside pocket of his coat. The robbery took place as he was about to alight from a North- western train on which1 he, his wife and hi? four-year-old son had just ar- rived from Chicago. The work was done by pickpockets. They are de- scribed as having been well dressed, but, further than that, nothing is known of their possible Identity. Fifty Fishing Boats Wrecked. Tokio, June fishing boats have been wrecked off the coast of Kagoshimn and 350 of the crews have been drowned. The governor of the province has requested assistance from the government navyyard at Sasebo. First Session of Republican Con- vention Passes Quietly. CHEER ROOSEVELT'S NAME Mention of President Calls for Dem- onstration, but Defense of Constitu- tional Powers of the Courts Calls for Long Applauce. Chicago, June first session of the Republican national convention was devoid of any unusual incident and was devoted largely .to the ad- dress of Temporary Chairman Bur- rows, who occupied over an hour of the two-hour session in making the keynote speech of the campaign. In calling the convention to order Harry S. New, chairman of the Re- publican national committee, spoke briefly and his mention of the name ot President Roosevelt was greeted with an outburst of cheers. Mr. New Introduced Bishop Muldoon of Chicago, who recited with a clear, resonant voice thu "Lord's Prayer." Following a second announcement of the chairman Secretary Malloy ad- vanced to the front and read the- call for the convention. At the conclusion of (he reading ot the call of the convention there was some applause. Chairman Xew an- nounced that the national committee NATIONAL CHAIRMAN NEW. had recommended Senator J. C. Bur- rows of Michigan for temporary chair- man and the recommendation was unanimously approved. Senator Burrows was warmly ra- ceived as he stepped to the front ot the platform extension arranged for the use of the speakers. Senator Burrows' opening words spoken In a modulated hut dis- tinct tone. He constantly referred to the printed copy of his speech. He had been speaking about six minutes when he came to the first mention at President Roosevelt. He evidently felt just a little excited over the men- tion of tho president, for he bad some little difficulty in pronouncing the well known name. After several efforts he succeeded and at once a demonstra- tion began. The cheering lasted near- ly two minutes. Senator Burrows, in resuming, mentioned Fairbanks' name and there was a round of applause. Applause greeted the utterances ap- proving President Roosevelt's policy in relation to public lands and an addi- tional handclapplng followed the sen- ator's expressed regret that the ship subsidy had failed. The mention of Ellhu Root as "that matchless secre- tary of state" brought the New York- ers to their feet with cheers and wav- ing flogs and handkerchiefs. The struggle that Is going on over the adoption of an anti-injunction plank found a place in the day's pro- ceedings when an outburst of tumultu- ous cheering greeted Senator declaration that: "The Republican party has no sympathy with the spirit which would divest the courts of their constitutional powers or impeach their integrity." The demonstration was probably thu most enthusiastic of the session and was repeated when a little further on in his speech Senator Burrows spoke of the refuge which always could be found in the supreme judiciary. Senator Burrows; was unable to send his voice to the confines of the Coli- seum and only those in the front of the hall were able to hear his ad- dress. Toward the close his voice be- came weaker and very few of the thousands In attendance could catch his words. When he concluded tte roll call of states for the announce- ment of committee members VUK called for, but many in the audience had no time for this routine procedure and started to leave the hall. Before half the states had been called a mo- tion carried to hand the printed slips containing tho names to tho necretary and the convention adjourned for tho day.   

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