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Huron Daily Plainsman Newspaper Archive: May 6, 1964 - Page 8

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Publication: Huron Daily Plainsman

Location: Huron, South Dakota

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   Daily Plainsman, The (Newspaper) - May 6, 1964, Huron, South Dakota                               WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1964 THE DAILY PLAINSMAN, Huron, South Dakota PAGE NINE IIS. Vows To Stay In Okinawa As Long As Threats Continue By ROBERT EUNSON NAKA, Okinawa will remain here so long as threats and tensions continue to The threats referred to are from Communist China. The tensions have gripped this part of the world 19 years. Here happens to be Okinawa', a 67-mile-long island, believed to be Uncle Sam's most impor- tant nuclear weapons base in the Far East. It is 15 minutes, as the jets fly, from Red China. The statement about remain- ing here was made by Lt. Gen. Paul W. Caraway, high commis- sioner to the Ryukyu Islands since 1961. "We're here for national se- curity and to fulfill our com- mitments to the free Caraway told The Associated Press. "We can only carry out that task if we unimpeded." Asked about a suggestion that' political control of the Ryukyus be returned to Japan with the United States still retaining its vast network of air and mili- tary bases, Caraway replied "anything is "Article Three of the Japa- nese peace treaty says the Unit- ed States is and the Jap- anese agreed to any and all powers of administration, legis- lative -and judicial, in the Ryukyu Islands, The United States can exercise these pow- ers so long as it he said. Asked if Okinawa actually .might .je written off in case of an all-put .war because of its proximity to the Chinese main- land, Caraway snapped: "This is an attitude that is de- veloping in the United States, especially among Washington newsmen. We will remain here so long as threats and tensions continue to exist." One school of thought among this island's American inhabitants, including the 3rd Marine Division, is that Okina- wa would be safer than the mainland since both the Com- munists and the United States would be blasting at each oth- er's homeland in case of atomic war. dkinawa is known as "the billion-dollar but that figure can't include all Uncle Sam has invested here. The whole island is one mighty biise. Military and civilian roads, telephone systems, water and power networks are completely integrated. Bases on Japan have been! emasculated, so far as any true strength is concerned, because of left-wing opposition to nu- clear weapons or the basing there of planes or vessels which transport them. "We are here to meet our security arrangements with our Caraway declared. "We're here to protect the Reasons Why Sears Mower Best Buy! Durable 16-inch Hand Mowers Craftsman Best 18 iii.. 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And that is the position some Americans in Ok- inawa want Caraway and his successor to have. "We need an organic act by Congress which will put the Ryukyus in a commonwealth status, such as we have Puerto Rico, Guam, or used to have the Philippine says Howard of the American Chamber of Com- merce on Okinawa. McClellan and other Ameri- cans here hold that a common- wealth status is necessary until such time as the islands revert to Japan. Accuse Chinese Of Searching For Partners MOSCOW (AP) The Soviet Communist party suggested to- day that Red China's leaders are playing up to capitalists in West Germany, Britain, France and Japan. The allegation was made' bji Kommunist, the Soviet party's official theoretical journal, and was distributed in advance of publication by the governmenl news agency Tass. "When Chinese propaganda speaks about the struggle against Kommu nist declared; "it reduces it only to the struggle against the United States, bypassing their European and Jap anese imperialists'. "Is it 'possible that the Chi nese leaders .-are looking for partners among the monopolis circles of West German, Brit France and Japan in the struggle against so-called 'mod era The latter term." is one-the Chinese use in .attacking pre mier Khrushchev's policies, in eluding his espousal of peacefu coexistence with the-West. Insecticides Kill Mississippi Fish NEW ORLEANS, La. Huge on the lowe Mississippi by potent insecti cides may force a choice be tween ;tbe farmer and the river Scientists from the U.S. Pub lie Health Service told a pollu tion investigating committee Tuesday that. Endrin and' sim ilar pesticides are 'the .villain, The kills, involving millions o fish, have hit the lower.Missi; sippi and the Atchafalaya River which branches off the'.Missis sippi through Louisiana! The- problem is: Banning pesticides would make fife mor difficult them to destroy, pests that pre on crops. Some scientists, and spoke, men for manufacturers o'f th insecticide, deny charges the chemicals are responsibl for the river damage. The PHS scientists testifie before representatives of pollu tion control agencies from Ark ansas, Louisiana, Mississipp and Tennessee. Post Off ice Cut Will Have Small Effect Here: Larson The vast majority of the resi- ents of the Huron area will not e affected by the recently-an- ounced adjustments in parcel ost and post office window ervices, Acting Postmaster Sid- ey Larson said today. Recaping the local postal sit- ation, he pointed to these acts: Mail service on the four Ilu- on rural routes will be the a m e as before, six days a eek with all types of service oatinued. The eight city carrier routes 'ill continue the same service ]Iark Receives Most Superiors At Music Contest DOLAND More than 300 students entered the grade ichool music contest at Doland May 2. Clark took high honors with 23 superiors. Doland re- ceived 22. Superior ratings were award- ed to Doland, Janelle Tschetter, Cherrie Hofer, Rita Ann Bolk, :heryl Becker, Sharon Franz, Sandra Warren, Douglas-Rahm, Maria McL'eod, Dwight Gooson, Judy Rahm, Candyce Gilbert, Dick Rabm, Jill Cluts, Janet Hansen, Lon Roberdeau, Patti Labrie, Sandra Dittman, Cherrj Coats, Debbie Thompson, Kent Cartner, the clarinet trio, cornet trio; Clark, Valarie T h o r s o n Therisa Weisbord, Joe Peters Jim Roseland, Larry K e y e s Diane Gustoffson, Marcia Lura Gwen Resick, Rebecca Mead Mary Jo Clausen, Candyce Woodland, Kay Phillip, Judj Mead, Margil Ferra, John Hamre, Geoffry Heig, Anna Harare, Dennis Keyyl, R i t Voas, Chuck Larson, John Clau sen, Vic Hamre; Tulare, Rita Ames, Keith Trubandth, Janet Sires, Bob Feldsen; Cavour, Marlyse Cul ver, Mike Farrell, Darial Wai lers, Merlin Smith, Sandra French, Sandra Bick, Deboral Dennis, Deborah Jensen, Tom Moeding, Jeanis Bick, Deborah Gilchrist, Marilyn Maecler, Ju dy Eckman, Bruce'Wintell, Col leen Culver; Redfield, Rollie Titus, LanetL Jones, Clark Seinstrom, Perrj Hootland, Lynette Johnson, Path Fogelson, Sandra Eicon, Debbi Greak, Kathy Meyer, Richarc Moller, Jerald Puss, Sarah Per Jeffrey Johnson, Lyn Asker; Willow Lake, Rud Haug, Jani Mitchell, Rita Bruley, Cind Burnes, Curtis Lamb, Jan Madsen, David Haug. as in the past. Parcels up to two pounds (and not bigger than a shoe box) will be delivered by city carriers. Mounted routes will deliver parcel post as us- ual six days a week. About one- j fourth of all parcel post pack- ges are in this category. In the small post offices in the uron area where no addition- 1 clerical hours will be requir- d on Saturdays, they will con- mue the same services as us- al, including issuing money or- ers on that day. At time, Larson aid, .he has received informa; ion on the national scope of the ervice adjustments which ate very little overall effect ia nticipated from the order, hoich started Monday. "Many -of oui- -local people who send mail to other points many who visit other cities nd transact postal business in hose and many others who will be in other communi- ies at vacation lime will be he explained. He released the following na- ional findings on the overall ef- ect of the adjustments: Parcel Post Only an estimated six to eight per cent of toial parcel post will be affected in any way. Ac- tons to elininate delays will" aregly or entirely offset any de- ays that would othenvise result from the adjustment, and it is expected overall service will be improved. About smaller and medium-size post offices do not have any parcel post routes now and their service is not in- volved at all, of course. Window Service Window service on Saturday will continue to provide all es- DANNY QUINN LEAVES OLDHAM Danny Quinn le for California Sunday where h will make his home with hi parents who moved there recen ly. He spent the weekend wit the Bob LongviUes. ART DISPLAYED WESSINGTON 'SPRINGS The Jerauld County rural a r exhibit may be viewed at th community room of the.court house May 2-9. sential services stamp sales, parcel post transactions, reg- istry, COD services, etc. Post office lobbies normally open on Saturday will not be "closed down." Lobbies will ba open for lock box services, stamp dispenser service, mail deposit, etc. Postmasters at most smaller post offices will sell, and rural carriers will continue to take applications for money orders on Saturdays. Rural carriers serving out of. such 'offices will .dispatch money orders received on Saturdays, oh the same day; otherwise if they serve out of larger city offices, their rural money order applications will be handled early Monday. Window services in at least post offices which have never had more than one win- dow open on Saturdays art, of ;Dr. J. D. McMillan OPTOMETRIST 2 Doors East The Plainsman Phone EL 2-5353 FOR USED CARS SEE D. Urquhart Sons for Chrysler Corp. DICKINSON INCINERATOR CO. Huron, South Dakota 57350 YOU Ca" Beautify Your Garden I With A C< Heg. Introductory. Price_____ CONCRETE INCINERATORS LAST FOR YEARS CONCRETE incinerators resist weather, fire and rust burn refuse and garbage with a minimum of odor, and never become an rusty burned out -eye sore to disgrace your yard. 'V CONCRETE incinerators stay attractive and clean looking throughout the'ir long life and can be painted your favorite color with any water or oil base paint. The 2" walls never get hot and cause the paint to burn off. CONCRETE units have been in use for many years, and are still attractive looking. They are rein- forced with steel imbedded in fire resistant concrete formula that resists fire, rust and weather, comes to you with a grate and cast iron cap spark arrestor. The unit is 36" high with a base 23" x 23" 3 bushel capacity ashes are removed through a handy cleanout door at the bottom. Cast iron cap opens out, to form a convenient chute for easy loading. Our careful planning and designing is your assurance of long life and trouble free operation j Phone Your Order Now For Early Delivery In Blunt see Ruby Parks In Hitchcock Dale Van Yoorhis Other Area Agents Wanted Or Contact j DICKINSON INCINERATOR CO. 1631 Kansas S. E. Huron, S. D. 352-4380   

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