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Florence Morning News Newspaper Archive: September 26, 1972 - Page 1

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   Florence Morning News (Newspaper) - September 26, 1972, Florence, South Carolina                               GOOD MORNING! It's Tuesday, September OUR 49TH 270 The Only Daily Paper Published in Eastern South Carolina FLORENCE, S. C. DAILY 10S SUNDAY 15' HOPE FOR SPITZ Mark Spitz, the Olympic swimming star, and Bob Hope enjoy the situation as Warren Dorn, a Los Angeles County supervisor, presents Spitz with another award to add lo his seven gold medals. Spitz will appear on Hope's Oct. 5 TV show. (AP) Nixon Calls for Reforms In World Money System WASHINGTON (AP) With a surprise announcement that the United Slates is ready [o lay reform proposals on the (able. President Nixon called nn Monday for an im- mediate sliin on negotiations to reshape the world's monetary system and Iraele niles. "'Hie lime.has come? for action across the enlire front of international economic Nixon told the governors of Ihe 124-nation International Monelaiy Fund and Ihe World Hunk at the. opening of Iheir annual meetings. Nixon blunted foreign criticism that the United Slates has dragged its feel on reforms by announcing that Secretarv of the Treasury George Shnltx. will present "a number of pro- posals" to this four-day meeting on Tuesday. They represent "the best thinking of my economic ad- visers." Nixon said. "I eommend (hem to you for careful A spokesman for the U.S. delegation said Shullx. wnuld nol offer a complete or comprehensive plan but would offer "some ideas for starters" that would go mere slatemenls of principle. In his unusual appearance before the governing boards of the global financial agencies, Nixon emphasized two basics of US the monetary talks be accompanied by negotiations to eliminate Inide barriers and that this coun- try he accorded Ihe power to adjust the value of the dollar, as other countries change the exchange of Iheir currencies. 'We shall press for a more equilahle and open world of McGovern, Agnew Swap Accusations Nixon pleged. "We .shall meet competition rather than rim away from it. "We shall- be a stimulating trading partner and a straight forward bargainer. Then in a sentence clearly addressed lo Ihe Kuropcan Common Market, which has been creating common barriers lo imports while forging a hloc of trade preferences with other countries of I'ureipe and added: "In turn, we shall look to our friends for evidence of similar rejection of isolationism in economic and political affairs." But llie President also had a sentence lo placate Die AKI.-CIO and others who have accused U.S. mnllinational corporations of closing production lines al home and setting up plants abroad. The U.S. companies argue they mnsl set up foreign subsidiaries because they I'annot penetrate foreign markets wilh exports. "I want to sec new jobs created all over (lie world." said iVixon. "but I will not condone llie cxporl of jobs out ol the United Stales caused by an unfairness built into Hie world's I railing system." Nixon gave no clue lo what method will propose lor giving the United Slates a means of adjusting the dollar's Since all non-Communist currencies are valued in terms of the dollar as a standard it is not possible for the United Stales lo move as other coanlries do lo correct a payments imbalance by a currency devaluation. McGovern's Poll I Record Worst Yet I By Tlir Associaled Press The rival presidential candi- dates' camps traded accusa- tions Monday: lhal George McGovern is too naive lr> nego- tiate effectively with Ihe So- vieis and lhal President Nix- on's administration is eloing "the special-interest bidding of the forces of greed and privi- lege." Vice President Spiro T. Ag- ricw. campaigning in San An- tonio. Tex., again raised Ihe foreign-policy issue. He quoted McGovern as saying be expects the Soviet Union to regard him as a friend ami try In keep his friendship. "It is so naive that it is noth- ing short of frightening.. Agncw said. "The foreign-pol- icy decisions of (he Soviet Un- ion are not arrived at by con- sidering whether they will pro- mote or impair a chummy rela- tionship with our president." With Ihc enrivonmcntal-mind- ed Western States Water anel Power Consumers Conference as his forum in Billings. Mont.. McGovern said (hat if Ihe names of contributors of S10 million to Ihc Nixon campaign were disclosed: "II would be such a shocking revelation of the working rela- tionship between the big oil (Sec CAMPAIGN', Pagc2AI McGovarn trails worse than i any candidate in history of polls, but Gallup says it isn't over yet. PageSA. Columnisl Sylvia Porter trans- lales (he arcane terminology of Ihe international money men. i Page 9B. i Death toll reaches 22 in crash of jet into California ice cream parlor. Page 5A. I WEATHER Parfly cloudy wilh a chance of tonight. High.-mid 80s, low: mid 60s. Details on Page 3A. Deaths IDAS Editorials SB'S Sporls U.S. Asks Parley Against Terrorism Rogers Appeals To U.N. UNlTI'l) NATIONS, X.Y. (Al'i The United Stales has called mi Ihc United Nations in convene a global conference: by early next year lo shape: a Irualy clamping down on inter- national terrorism. While Secretary of Stale Wil- liam P. Rogers was submitting a U.S-proposed treaty In [lie 1X> nation General Assembly on Monday. I'resident Nixon ylso underlined American urgency by establishing a special Cabi- tie'l Committee In Combat Ter- rorism. Nixon, in Washington, named lingoes lo head the Cabinet group. 11 will coordinate Amrri can tint [terrorist efforts domes- tically and abroad. Rogers tnld Hie assem bly that criminal violence against innocent persons is tearing "Ibe very fabric of in- lernalional ordei1." U.S. Am- bassador W. Taplcy ISennetl Jr. urged (he U.N. Legal Com- mittee lo begin work on a trea- ty immediately. U.S. Diplomats said Ihe main effect ol (lie Irealy would he In bring alKJiil cxlradilion of al- legeil offenders to Ihe country where (heir crime was com- millcd in' sliff prosecution by llie coiinlry which holds lliem. They could also he e.vlraeliled lo Ihe country agiiinsl wliom llie crime was commillcil. The Irealy conference plan was pan of an eight-point rcso leili'in Rogers asked the world body lo adopt as "decisive ac- tion losnppre'ss these demcnleel acts of terrorism." Iniliiil reaclion to Ihe secrc- a.lry's half-hour presentation, in his annual policy speech at llie General Assembly opening de- hate, was limited. Hrilain's foreign secretary. Sir Alec Douglas-Monte, said "llie subject has to he dcall wilh" IHI! he deferred further cnrnmenl pending sludy of Ihe U.S. pojxisals. Andrei A. Clroimko of the So- viet Union said he wonld have to study Ihe U.S. offering "throughly." Israel's Abba Kban likewise declined imme- diate comment. The terrorism question Die highlight of general debate so far is contentious because various Arab. African and Asian governments feel it is aimed against liberation and antieolonial causes they sup- porl. .Much international terrorism is politically motivated, and there is disagreement over how to define deeds which their per pelralors portray as different from ordinary crimes. The U.S.-proposed Ireaty wnuld bit al the those who kill, kidnap or cause "serious bodily harm" in civilians in crimes committed "by foreigners in a country uhich is not their rcdil- ical target. YOUNG REFUGEE Mohamed Klialid munches a sandwich Sunday, his fourth birthday and his first day away from his homeland, Uganda. He was on a plane filled with refugees from Ihe strife-torn African nation that landed in Stansted, England. (AP) Vietnam Atrocity Stories Heighten Bloodbath Fears SAIGOX (APi- As refugees tell it. 10 civilian1' in Quajig Ngai Province' were locked in a building and blown up with dynamile because1 they wnv considered "unsuitable lor in doclrinalion." In oDier cases, uives and children have uatciicd their menfolk shot in bal'-hcs of a (I o e n following "people's trials" in Diah and turn provinces. Their crime: lack of enthusiasm for Hanoi brand ol liberation. These and other alror-ny ski- ries trickling onl of enemy-oc- cupied areas have reinforced American apprehensions ol a bloodbath if llie Communists take over South Vietnam. U.S. officials are particularly con- cerned about what they rail "spile killing." "Any time you pursue the bard revolutionary line you're going have a bloodbath." said one American who in- ve.iligates atrocities. "Yon have lo knock off [he old order lo make way the new. In this respect the Viet Cong arc- as nasty as ever. "Spile enters inlo it when you gel a guerrilla who's lived in Ihe jungle for five years and siiddenlv Siruis himself oct.'iipy- Senate Hits Thieu rAi'i TIIK Senate adopted a con- (leimjalion whal il called repressive acts ol (he regime of Presidenl Xguyen Van Thieu ill Vietnam. The amendment to the: billion foretgn-military-aid bill uas adopted by voice vole with only four Democratic senators and no Republicans on Ihe floor. II would require Ihe Presi- denl lo "ose all available lever- age, including llie withholding ol assistance aulborixed by this act." to implement the policy ol of Thieu-regime actions. ing a town where everyone owns radios and Hondas. There'll be a lot more gmlly verdicts in llie people's trials. "The Noilh Vietnamese are supposed lo be belter dis- ciplined. more well behaved, but they're becoming downright spiteful loo. They come south expecting to he greeted as lib- eralois and find everyone run- ning away. They gel mad and slmnl up some ne-e farmers. Sheer spile." The official noted th.il in Tet Ihe Communist command h I a m e d American combat Iroops for an expected popular uprising. This year the North Vietnamese couldn't use this excuse and they "lost Iheir cool." A North Vietnamese prisoner who participated in the April ambushes said he had been told by his officers thai "anyone go- ing south was my enemy." Since ihen it has become a standard .North Vietnamese lac- lic lo encircle a population cen- ter Freed U.S. POWs Scientists to Chart BCG Cancer Fight Due Here Thursday By BRIAN SULLIVAN AP Science Writer NEW YORK (AP) Scientists from 10 nations will meet next month to discuss one of the possible ways of treating cancer the use of a substance called 'iG to "wake up" (he body's natural defense mechanisms. BCG research is part of the burgeoning science oi immunology. Ihc study of the way the body fights off foreign invaders. It is one of the main avenues of cancer research, along wilh such approaches as the search for viruses as causes and Ihe possibility of developing a vaccine. The scientists involved fn all this research agree that any answers arc a long way off and caution against raising hopes prematurely. The BCG meeting, lo be held Del. 5-6 al the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., will be the first devoted solely to lhat subject. About 80 scientists will attend. Attention was focused on RCG on Saturday with a report from !he Atomic Entrny Com- mission's Oak Ridge National a'lory of BCG's successful use in eradicating lumors in laboratory animals. The most dramatic report so far came last May from Dr. Edmund Klein of Roswell Park Memorial Institute, in Buffalo, N.Y., who said he had successfully treated wilh irnrmmolherapy five advanced cases of breast cancer in humans. The five cases, he said, were all in varying degrees of remission or slate of arrest. But he. loo, cautioned against raising false hopes: "The data presented he said, "should he viewed as exploratory and are pf'ulim'iiy indiCrtiiv't- of fctiAi'ujiiiy and oi avenues justifying further pursuit, raihcr llian as therapeutic procedures." Klein and other scientists will report on clinical trials wilh RCG at Ihe Belhescla mccling. Among the will be Dr. Georges Malhc of France and Dr. Ian T. Magrath of Uganda. HCG Bacillus CalmotleGuerin is a strain of tuberculosis bacteria used for many years in anli-TB vaccines. Most peo- ple have developed an immunity (o TB. so Ihe idea is lhat in administering Hie BCG Ihe body's memory of Ms reaction to (he TB bacteria is reawakened. Wliuii iliis happens, (he natural deiense mechanisms arc- brought forth in struijjiii and attack the. foreign cancer cells, just as the body naturally tends lo reject an im- planted heart. The BCG apparently initiates a complex reaction lhal results in killer known as hisliorycles attacking Ihe lumors. N'iW YORK (APi A spokesman for an antiwar group lhal was instrumental in getting three American prisoners ol war released by .North Vietnam said Monday the party would arrive in York Thursday night via Moscow and Copenhagen. Vincent McC'ec. who said he was (he executive director of Ihe Committee of Liaison With Families of Servicemen De- tained in North Vietnam, said he had been informed by members of the group in Hanoi lhal the partv would fly ou't ol .Moscow Thursday morning, presumably on Aerofloi, the Soviet airline, bound lor Copenhagen. I .ale in the morning, he said, a news conference will be held at Ihc airport in Ihc Danish capital. Then, McGce reported, the nine-member party will board .Scandinavian Airlines .System Flight (in, due at'Now York's Kennedy International Airport al 7 p.m.   

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