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Florence Morning News Newspaper Archive: April 16, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Florence Morning News

Location: Florence, South Carolina

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   Florence Morning News (Newspaper) - April 16, 1951, Florence, South Carolina                             Published In The Heart, Of The Pee Dee Section The Richest Farm Area In The Palmetto State VOL. XXVIII NO. 102 DAILY AND SUNDAY Wood Fires Cause Great Damage In Pee Dee, State To Acres Burn In Cheraw Park South Carolina forests dry as a tinder box burst into flames yesterday throughout the state and the Pec Dee nrea. Fanned by 20 mile an hour winds, fire dcstrovcd an estimated lo acres of limber in Cheraw State Park in Chesterfield county, state forestry officials told The Morning News by telephone last night. The blaze was reported under control early this morning. That was the major fire of the day. But Florence and surrounding counties had their fire troubles. Hay Anderson, Florence district ranger, repoited five forest fires in Florence county, another five in Horry two in Darlington and Dil- ]ort and one in Marlboro county. All were under control last night, lie said, except one in Horry. While lighting its own fires, all manpower and equipment here that could be spared was sent to fight the Cheraw State Park fire, Acting District Forester A. E. spent the day in Horry helping fire fighters there. Anderson said no report on the acreage burned in this district wa s avail able yet bu t pre d i cted Ihe damage would be "pretty se- vere." A light suppression unit from Darlington county was sent to help fight the Cheraw fire. Flor- ence District Assistant Forester C. A. Broadway also went to the scene. Meanwhile, the Associated Press in Coluinbia reported dry woods and a stiff breeze combined in at lensi two bad forest fires in the state's sandhills belt. The State Forestry Commission reported bad woods blazes east of Blanoy, about 20 miles north of here, and in the Cheraw Stale Park in Chesterfield County. At least two other fires were burning between Blancy and die- raw Park. The fire near Blaney was ob- scni ing Str.tc liignway GOl be- tween Cam den and Sumter with smoke. Stale Highway Patrolmen were sent "onl to warn motorists against entering the area. Both the .Blancy., ajid Cheraw Stole Park fires were brought'un- der control. But a third was raging on the Fort Jackson army train- ing reservation northeast of here. Mor: than 200 soldiers, forestry men and other volunteers were fighting the Jackson blaze. Nearly nil the sandhill hell counties north of Columbia bad woods fires. Below Columbia, Or- angcburg and Aiken were suffer- ing from ati outbreak of blazes. Horry county also had some fires. All these blares are "particular- ly the forestry com- mission because the sap is up in the trees, and the heat of the flames will kill trees they don't burn The Forestry Commisirm gave tbis sum ma i y of the disastrous Cheraw Park fire, which burned over nn estimated to -1.000 ft destroyed the six-room house, and all personal possessions, ol Park Foreman William McMillan. It burned down the Laurel pic- nic ?heltef', several picnic tables, two latrines and oilier equipment. The flames burned out the fam- ous dogwood tree picnic area. A iifih' jraclor was destroyed. Thiue fire fighters escaped possible death from the flames by taking refuge in the park lake. A large recreation area and nine vacation cabins escaped damage. The Campbell pond Negro vecre- area was burned over, orestry commission personnel Avcre aided in bringing the park fire undo-' control by the Cheraw fire and volunteers. The blaze began near U. S. Highway Number 1, raped through the jumped U. S. highway No 52. Cause of the blaze was being investigated. FLORENCE, S. C. MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 16, 1951 DAILY Sc-SUNDAY 35c HAMBONE'S MEDITATIONS By Alley VAN-FLEET TAKES OVER KOREA Gen. Matthew 15. Hiditwiy new suiirrmc commander, and Li. (Ten. James Van Fleet, new 8th Army commamlrr. salute Hie colors during a changeover of commands in Korea, Kidjtuav rcliimuishpd field command of the Eighth army and flew to Tokyo where he replaced General Douelas MacArllmr. via Radio From Tokyo) Byrnes Asks House To Adopt Free Conference Money Bill SPAKl'ANBURG (.-Pj The era! Assembly, nt odds on a j appropriations and 3 per- cent sales tax bill for 1951-52, was urged yesterday by Governor-! Byrnes lo a quick agreement. i The measure will inaugurate a sales tax and carries the most extensive public school program in the state's history. It includes a school building program, u r.tate school bus system, and substantial pay raises for teachers. The bill, worked over by a free conference committee, was adopt- ed by the Senate but rejected by the HOUFC. The representatives, upset by a change in liquor taxes, still left tlie door open to recon- sider its rejection action when the assembly reconvenes Tuesday at noon. Byrnes said his home here yesterday that he hoped the lluiibe .would, reconsider and adopt the bill. Discussing the situation which Thursday found the House re- jtecting the report by.a 5l-o9 vote, the governor told The Herald that he disapproves of the change in levying taxes on liquor profits but that he hopes ihe House will re- consircd its vote and adoot the measure. Governor Byrnes suggested that the provision on liquor taxes could changed in the deficiency ap- propriations bill which the Houte will consider in a few days. "I hope 11 ic House will recon- sider and adopt (lie free conference renoil on the general appropria- tions the governor declared at his lionic here where he is visiting for ihe weekend. lll think the provisions in that bill for the education program are better than either the original House bill or the Senate bill. ''My information is that the Hoiiic failed to adopt, ihc report last Thursday because the special lax levied for several years upon the gross profits of wholesale liquor dealers was changed lo a graduated lax on sales. The change >vas recommended by vepresciUa- lives of the lax commission'. Some legislators believed 1 Id less- en the revenue from this sourcn. A l.irgcr number believed it and were so opposed lo such u decrease they voted to reject the free conference leporl." Asked what he thought of Ihe proposed liquor tax change, the governor irplicd: "T sympathize with the view that the tnxes paid by wholesale liquor dealers should not IK- decreased while other taxes are be-in s increased. However, the House and Senate can consider this proposal upon its merit when the deficiency appioprialions bill is considered in the next few days. existing tax upon the prof- its of liquor dealers can be re- stocked without running the risk of having another free conference committee make changes in the education program or in general appropriations and thus Uelr.y ad- journment for weeks." Concluding he "When the members ait> assured they will have an opportunity before ad- journment lo vole, uirecily on the question of restoring the existing tax on wholesale liquor dealers, 1 hope they will -adopt the 'report with the splendid education pro- gram." Japanese Give MacArthur Spectacular Sendoff As He Leaves To Return To States Congress To See Hero Thursday The Associated Press A liig and noisy "welcome home" awaits General Dou- glas JliicArlhur. In many communities across (.he nation the program calls for whistle blowing, horn tooling and tinging oC church bells. WASHINGTON (AT) General MarArthur will address a joint mcclitiK of Conjprrss at p. ni. Thursday, Kcpresenlalive -Marlin (R-Mass.) said last night. Martin, lluu.se Republican leader, added that the dcpnseil Jtcneral probably will arrlvr In NYashington Thursday morning from San Francisco and leave for New York sometime Thurs- day afternoon. 5-Sfar General Has'Finesf Hour' TOKYO (AC) General Dou- tflas MiiL-Atlliur sturtcil the lonj: journey home Unlay with a lirro'a nirewpl] from the Japanese lo whom ho came as a conijiioroi' five years and seven months ago. Drafting Of College Men To Be Delayed This Spring Until Standings Are Given WASHINGTON (.-Ti Selective Service Director Lewis B. Iler- shey said yesterday drafting of follcfic nifn will be delayed this spring until their test scores and scholastic standings have been calculated. Hers hey also said, in a broad- cast and in conversation with re- porters, that he believes "the great mass of college freshmen will as- semble freely next fall without interference from selectivc sciv- ice." Educators here said of queries have been received from college meb wonicd by ihe Tact lhat their school terms and their Matuioiy deferment may end before they can take the "forth- coming college qualification test, or before their scholastic grades are out. Students who score 70 or better in the test, or who me in th? upper ranks scbolastic.illy, may be granted occupational deferment, in. order to resume iheir education next fall. Jlowevcr, many school terms end before the test May 26, June 16 and June 30 __ and scholastic standings often are not dclei mined by colleges lor weeks after school is out. Timmonsville Voters To Pick Mayor And Council Tomorrow TIMMONSVILLE Timmons- ville Democratic voters will go lo the polls tomorrow to nominate a mayor anri six councihnen to gov- ern the town's affairs for the next two years. Voting wilt take place at the national gnfml armory on Main Street from 3 a. m. to p. rn. Candidate? for mayor nrc Ralph D. ?.lcT.endonr seeking i and .fennincs R. Hancock. Four incumbent councilman Former Florence Guard Unit Leaves Camp Stewart, Ga. CAMP STEWART, Ga. The The 7l3ih mnni.nnflcil by Lieutenant Colonel Timt N. ton of Florence. One oT ils uni Battery D, formerly drilled in the armory here before being foderal- ii'ed last Aupiist, Britain Lights Up LONDON iff) Thn biipht lichl.> wont on again in Britain Sim( night after alt- week dimout to save coal. A. T. Charlie Anderson, A. Use Mnoic and T. Carroll Play- er are seckin? lo retain iheir seats- Others offering for the ?ix council chair? arc C. U. Sineath, L. I.. (Roy) Smith. Grndy Wade Sr.r Kalcich N. A.'Cadriy W. R. Hcddingficld and W. Croswoll. Primary election nio Dr. E. H. Turner. John Ci. Sr., and Fi cd Turner, Chairman J. A. ['eny or Die Timinonsvillc Dc-moci atic Ciub ?airi n second piiniavy v.-il] be Tucsdav, April 24, if ncccssarv. Horshey said also that the Kil- day amendment to Ihe draft bill which the House passed Friday, setting out that draft boards are not to be bound by the aptitude tests, "in no way impairs our plans for giving the tests or using the scores." The final draft law is yet In be worked out through combination of Senate anri versions. The house voted in the Kildny amend- ment after hcai ing arguments lhat the scholastic deferment plans were unfair and undemocratic .something Horshcy previously has disputed. Hcrshcy described the amend- ment by Representative Kilday (D-Tcx) as an expression of con- gressional anxiety lest the author- ity of local Ixiards be infringed upon. ''It merely i a of affairs ihai already existed thai the id ti male decision a> to wheiher n man should or should not be drafted rc.-is with his local Kcrshey Snid. He rallied that some draft hoards have ricfciTcd coISopo stu- without nhvFic.il lion, because of the stat- utory deferment for '.he (in renl year. Other loral honi cis have examined and classified Flu- dents, and slil! other.1; have, FO far lo pn; nut orders fm in- and then in postpone the student's HK IS DRAFT MIchaM Collins reads a iiotfrc he received a few days ago ordering him lo appear his Iwal draft hoard in Newark. X. J. UK irate mother. Collins, brought Michael (n thf a.ctonKlicd hoard which apolojrizrd for the appArenl error, saylns: it all a mistake they could nnl (AT Wfreptiofo) Various other tributes also are scheduled for the general, ousted from his Far Eastern commands by President Truman in the midst of a policy dispute now raging in Ihi national capital. Probably the most spectacular display will be in York City, where MacArthur is booked for a returning hero's parade. The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, where the general plans to' stay during his New York visit, read- ied n hjgc five-star banner lo hang from its flagstaff. In Rotterdam. N'. Y., Tuesday was proclaimed "MacArthur Day." Most observances were limed to coincide with the five-slar gen- eral's arrival in San Francisco. His plane is scheduled tenta- tively tojrjeiich (here S'm Francisco ha'd plaithccf a hero's welcome for him but the cetebr.itton was cancelled yester- day at tha general's request. Plans for a formal reception at Ihe airport, a parade into San Francisco and greetings at (lie city hall were called off because Mac- Arthur's plane will not arrive un- til after dark. A formal ceremony will be re- scheduled for some time Wednes- day. Some of the other celebrations have the blessing of city officials. Still others are backed by organ- izations and individual sdmireiT. In Cincinnati, the Minute Wom- en of Air.cikM said residents will ring bells, blow whisties and sir- ens. The "M.icAilJnjr which bloomed in the 10-18 presidential election year when the general was a pulc-ntial candidate, was revived Baltimore. Followei s scheduled a mass demonstration at the base of Washington's Monument, wilh patriotic jsong5 and hymns, honor- ing the general at his arrival on the coast. Baltimore Mayor Thomas rl'Alc- srmdro extended an offiicM invita- tion to the general lo .stop over in the city. Maryland Governor Theodore R. McKelrtin asked MnrArthur to speak in the. old state seriate chamber wheir George Washing- ton resigned as commanding Ren- era 1 of America's Continental Army. in CIiiraRo, Ihe Associaiion of Commerce urged a parade honor- ing ihe goner a I. Some factories and railroads in lhat city 5aid thny will their whistles the momoiii hie lands. Tn Danville and Maltoon, 111., well ;i s doze iis o f other low cjlL7.0H5 wore asked to him on ihr as soon as they rit-ws of MacArttiur'fi arrival. Clergymen in ?ome communi- ties said special prayers would be offered for the general. Exactly what Mac-Arthur's itin- erary wiil be once he reaches the remained uncertain. Hut the last word from him paid he woul-1 reach New York Cttv's International Airport Thursday night. fn accepting the invitation of New York City's Mayor Vincent R. Jrnpellitteii lo t.-ike part in an official reception, the general re- quested that no formal speeches by him bo scheduled. In Wellington, however, Re- publican leaders pushed for an ap- pearance by the general bcfoie a joint session of Congress.-A resolu- tion for .-uch a session is lo be con- sidered Tuesday. A 17-sun salute will welcome the general when he steps off his plane at iS'ew York. A mover's ip- (.cplion tommitU'f will hr. Ihcie to ;-Of-et him. In n cable to Imjif-llitlei i ye.slrr- MycArthnr said he w.unerl to so informally ]o his hotel Thurs- day and "would welcome ceremony on Friday morning." The miyor said a Cily Hall re- ccpiion would be held about noon Friday, a parade through Manhattan. It was predicted that pri haps four million persons would turn out to greet the gen- eral. ___ AI.LIKI) TllOOl'S under their new field rmnnuiider, I.l. firn. James A. Van Fleet, rnlnelied forward in Korea. On west coasl, Soulli Korean marines jained almost complelr control of OncJin I'eninsula In thrce-proneril ailvanre Allies movril forward on Chinese Hpii ha.se of C'liorwon ajtain.st heavy resistance. Other UN lank-infantry forces hammered at tales of Yansnu Allies Move Despite New Smoke Screen Strategem TOKYO Allied forces ram- med ng.Hnsl Heel positions lor limited gains today on the western and real nil Korean war fvonlj. Communist resistance behind a vast covering iinoke screen was spotty. A delayed field dispatch report- ed on the eastern lip of the Hwnchon Reservoir in cen- tral Km en, wns captured by nn Allied tank infantry task force Sunday. The United Nation.1; force rollec through fltflllery rfnd Kefl mortar fire before seizing the town. YimgKii, about six miles noith of parallel 38, was a strong- point, in tied defenses around Hwachon llcservoir, AP Correspondent Jim Beckei report ed Yanggti was descried when ihe Allied fnice entered. Tank shells had exploded ,-in am- munition dump among the shat- tered mud huts. Becker reported another AHied force beat off a Red counterattack Sunday afternoon noitheasl of Yanggu. On ihe western front, Allied pa- trols punched into Ked positions below Choi won. Chorwon. 17 mile north of parallel 38. is the vest- em anchor of Communist defenses and believed an assembly point for thousands of Red ichitorcc- ments. At US Eighth Army headquar- ters, AP Correspondent Robert Kunson reported the Koils bad started biush fires to obscure their movements from Allied aircraft. The cmoke pall may be hiding preparations for a massive Hod counter offensive. Smoke bellowed over the cen- tral front in clouds rising to 'iOO feel. It appeared that the Reds were adding in this shield by use of smudge pots. Chinese and Korean Reds bat- tled bitterly lo block a liiree- jirongoil Allied rtiive Sunday on the bills helow Chorwon, The hill? wci-n Uttered with Communist dead nficr a heavy Allied arlUlery barrage. a now" stratagem from JJcd co'rh- The Kiglitri Army reported the heavy smoke "resulting fi enemy burning activities" io.se over the western front at 1 p. i Additional reports of a smoke haze crime from Ihe eastern from as Communist resistance Uirncc. light. Vitdi Air Force headquarters said pilots were un.ihle to deter- mine tho results of iheir attacks in many cases "due lo ihe heavy haze that spread over most, of Communist held Korea." fighters and liphl bombers oi Hie US Fifth Air r-'nrcc neverthe- less flew 642 sorties during Ihc day, blasting 38 Communist oc- cupied towns. A dozen H-29s dropped 100 tons of linrnbs on the Yellow Sea port of Hacju. There was Klill some, concern that ihc Hcds miRhl he moving up their speedy buill jet fighters for frontline attacks on Allied ground forces and in- stallations. Three Teenagers Injured When Car Plunges Over Bridge Rail A trin of tcenngors were in- early lasi when a car passengers on Black 1-2 miles Wife Stabbed To'Death OIAIII.KSTON A 3li ycar- oltl slicctmotnt krr slrthbcd his wife lo (Icv.lh aftonimm ;irul criliiMlly uniinilrd liis uilii n hiilclicr knirc folliiu-- ing n rJorncstic nrynrnrnl. CJiicf Ciuii-lcslnn Cimnly Pulk-c .luliiin T. Aflci' IIii- scibliiiic. Chior Wil- linins s.Tirl, Tlinm.is A. Jimc.s i-ounly iwlici', lolil them hnrl linpprnoil, .inil then calmly .iwniicil ilieir nrrival. His wife, M.iry .Jones, wris rlcnc{ poiit-c iurivctl. liiiull.-nly, MIF. I'illiiMn. rciiniictl in i-i-ilic.il comhii.jn s: Roper Mospit.-il. plunged off a bi Creek Road about I northeast of Florence. They were identified at Mrl.eod Infh mm y Arthur Hccsc, 36. of VllR South Dnrgnn Street: Phihp Garner. IS. of F.Jm Street' and Carolyn Kilos, a 1G- ycar-old Sumter gn I. 1 loose, according to hospital au- thorities, suffered lacerations of the head and a f rat tine nf leg. Gardner sustnin- cd head injuries of an undeter- mined extent pending x-rny. The Riles sir! suffered a (loop lacera- tion of the rlgtit knee. Condition of all three patients wcie smtl lo be satisfactory last night. Investigating Mate highway pa- trolmen could not be contacted for details of the accident but it was understood there were eight teenage occupants of the car when it plunged off Muses Bridge span- ing Black Creek about p. m. The vehicle. It WHS said turn- ed completely ovr-r mid landed on the cicek bank. Five of the group weic pivcn first aid treatment -it. Mrlx-od Infirmaiy but wcte not admitted. The car. a 19-19 DeSo'n vcrtible. was to have almost intiiUv demoli.-hr-ri. The mi.ilKtp wiis Hie only M-uniis one (if i cpoi led by yoU-niay. In tJ.t- riiy, n iniho.ul wns onerMrrt l.y II. F. Weils'of 221 South Warley Street, ami ;i car operated by William IS. Kirbv of Tans nay JU. ,1 collided at the, num u nun u Evans Street ciossing. Invostigfit- Sum .1 in___m; ing officeis sniri Kirby told them he was bJinrio.d by tlir pun and ditin't the eneino. Ho not The car wa> fin the fiont fcnrirr. ron- hcen red al the corner of F-A'nns and Chuich Shfict'i and in the 50D block of K.di.sto Drive. No one was 'njiacd. Weafher Cooler Days Are Forecast I-KI: from the Uniied St, Weather Huior.u in Fin ten Uir LM cjiiiui From the moment lie left hi.; home m the Atneik'.ui Kmbassv at a. m. p. m. KST vS-.m- Iho soncral's w.is LI LH illiant It was icplc'.i.1 wilh mthtLii v and protix-nl, u ith honoV guards and blaring hanrls. swish- ing jet planes, Diluting officers and cheering, bowini; and ,fap- bv the hundrc-ds dj'cds of The "i I-year-old soldier was re- lieved from ;ill comnuind Apul tl by 1'irsidctit Tinman bccumo of ;i over how to iglit the Koiciin War and how to Communist agsvcssion in he Ensl. Now he is homeward bound, public welcomes in Hon- olulu, San Francisco and New York. IK1 expected to reach Hon- olulu about midnight. Sunday (T> i. m. Monday. but the re- nniiuler of his schedule was no1, definite as to time. Since the dismisbnl, MacArlhur had kept himself, secluded from the public until this morning1, when he took his nlacc m n wail- ing bliick limousine beside his devoted wife, Jean, and 111 year- old son, Arthur. Stiffly erect and without a flick- er, he saluted the 30 man honor Kuard representing oil branches of the United Slates Brmed forces as ids ear rolled from tha cm- Toky'o srnJefs where" lo Japanese awnilcd. Ui.s staff niemEicr-i and domestic st.ift who nccnmpnnicd him fol- lowed in six other cars while 10.- 000 Japanese police lined the pro- cessional route not for security, they said, but as a goodbye tribute to the man who has been their acting emperor since September 2, 1D45. At JEaneda Airport, the occupa- tion hierarchy was' assembled. lined, one side o( tbo run- way. The military, Ihe diplomats ,1 apa nose o f f id a Is were arrayed in strict order of precedence. The general arrived at, tha air- port at a. m., light on time. The solemnly spaced boom, of 19-gutis roared in salute. The general's pilot, Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Story, opened the door ol his limousine ai it halted. The general was the first out. Ho graciously helped his wife anri son from the machine. MacArlhur's successor, Lieuten- ant General Matthew B. TUrigway stepped forward and saluted. Ay MacArthnr's aide had pre- dicted, it was MncArlhur's finest hour in a life that has known many fine ones. Tlic a bit heavy snd it was cold. The general's breath VMS frosty. MacAitluir, old sukiicr that he is, inspected it. Diplomats, liis staff, member of :hc Japanese all were im- i pi csscd with MacArthur's bearing HIV I pi He look care to t-liakc each by the hsn-l. Tlio >un brokn ihrmiHri thr; clomis ;is the gcnciM strode onto the iinfiold. As he the UiO yards to hi-; n Kmd played "Tlin General's Miirch." At the top of tlic ramp MncAithur choking back tears. Thu t-cner.d followed. He was ut-rn faced, a pose he uses to hiflc emotion. SomeijiHly m the crowd yell- ed. "Job well done." Mrs. Mnc- waved na.iin. There -A.is from I the- crowd. Ami liio banu iilnyet! Old Lar.R Syiie. j Mat-Arthur avknowlcrlged tlie fhcvrs of the crowd with a smito hf'.ed hi-? old Mt-d cnmpaian cup us the started down the Overno.itl. jet fklr.cis swoopcc: At a. m. the Ralaan roav- rd off the runway and was air- It quickly disappeared in n Two other minor collision-, oc- ri.iy 71. fi.30 Cloudy fhfiii this rmon: parily dcnd> and con expect ;tflci- tinued ex.! to- i i Gl Shot At Myrtle MVKTl.s; I1KACII i 1'j Mastor lo distil :.o.n Niyitle Reacn His year old father bw. Kird PoweH of Mvrtie Roach. beint; held in '.he Ilorry coun- ty MI: in connection with th- npjnity Sheriff M l.rwiN s.'id f.irncd in at the Roach j-ollf   

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