Friday, June 17, 2011

Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - June 17, 2011, Aiken, South Carolina SSK ✓ j.k. Rowliitt^4s expected to make an announcement about a new website. 19A Friday June 17,2011 Vol. 145, No. 197 ^ < H i r Local Source Since _    „ W ww.aikenstandard.com = Today's Weather High %    97° Low 67° Full forecast 6C 50c Parkways get a makeover SRS asked to Changes will help prevent erosion in the woods prove MOX is worth funding By AMY BANTON Staff writer Aiken residents are starting to take notice of the changes made to the downtown parkways. Those changes were made in efforts to pre\ ent rushing stormwaters from causing erosion or pushing pollutants into Hitchcock Woods, and, as a result, the parkways have a whole new appearance. “I’m pleased with how they look,” said resident Bame> Lamar. “I was a hit concerned at first because it wasn't clear on what they were doing, but the landscaping, I think, turned out very well.” One change that has occurred most recently is the wooden bridges, complete w uh copper-colored post caps, being built over areas in the parkways containing deeper dips that were formed to collect rainwater. SM PARKWAYS, page 16A Out of work Naw dawn* and ongoing cd‘ms tor unamptoymant bonitos tau last imm. a po sit! va sign that tho /at* market & tacovering • Continuing lo claim urMHnpk>ym«n< maut anc* — Mali my miUai claim Staff photo by Amy Banian Alltrade employees construct a bridge on a parkway on York Street on Thursday morning. Visiting campers give back through service projects By ANNA DOLIANITIS Staff writer A House subcommittee on energ) and w ater development expressed concerns about the future of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site, calling on the National Nuclear Security Administra-tion to prove that it has not undertaken an "expensive and wasteful program.” The Energy and Water Development subcommittee is working with the hill that would make appropriations for the fiscal year ending in September 2012, including appropriations related to the $4.8-milhon MOX facility, which aims to turn 34 metric tons of surplus weapons-grade plutonium into MOX fuel to be used in commercial reactors. The problem lies in a slipping schedule, increased costs, a lack of customers interested in M( )X fuel and no decision made between constructing a new greenfield facility or recapitalizing existing facilities to supply feedstock to the MOX facility. Nearly S650 million has been spent over 11 years without a decision being made about the project’s Pit Disassembly and Conversation Facility, the committee said. ‘‘Ultimately, the success of the ov erall program hinges in its ability to anract crv Ilion customers,” the hill read. "With considerable investments already made, the NNSA must show leadership and prove it has not undertaken an expensive and wasteful program which will ultimately produce a fuel that industry does not want or that presents unnecessary risks that exceed any nonproliferation benefits,” Hic MOX facility’s main prospect is tin? Tennessee Please see MOX, page 16A Waaa ending June 4 3 SS MUHM Week ending June 11 414 OOO 2008    2009    2010    2011 NOTE    un tune wine UMI* .ag* wee amu bf Ona aaa* Souk* U 8 Oaeanmarx af utfxv 9 tell NCT to to© here© Kyle Parker plays in Augusta ► Former Clemson quarterback Kylf Parker is playing for the Asheville Tourists hi a series against hie Augusta GreenJackets Story 11B Aihhi (OagtfiR Fenton F. Ferguson, Aiken Deaths and Funerals 16A toettto Calendar SC Classifieds ID Crossword 4C Comics IC Dear Abby 4C Horoscopes 4C Markets 14A Movie Listings SC Nation/World 14A Obituaries 6A Opinions 15A Puzzles 4C Sports IB TV Listings 2C • .film By SUZANNE R. STONE Staff writer Summer campers at St. John’s United Methodist Church are having a different kind of tun in the sun this week. Through the Salkehatchic Summer Service program, high school and college-age campers from across South Carolina are spending the week on extensive home repair projects for Aiken County residents in need. Work on four home sites began Monday, and teams of campers, adult team leaders and construction professionals there to supervise work have been on duty from 7 a.m. to sundown each day, according to team leader Debra Rood. "We have four boys and three girls and two adults on our team The kids are ages 16 to 21, and they ’re mostly from Chesterfield and Florence,” Rood said. "This is my 11th camp, hut my first in Aiken usually I do projects in Bamberg. We started at 7 a m. Monday, and hopefully we’ll be done by 4:30, 5 p.m. Friday, ii we’re lucky ami (iud is with us, which I know he is.” Rood’s team is working on a home on Timberlane CMA speaker: Japan cleanup will take years Staff photo by Suzanne Stone Camp Salkehatchic workers Haley Griffith, Amy Wallace and Amy Choplin on rebuilding a porch stoop at an Aiken worksite Wednesday. Road, which required new walls, new floors, new linoleum, new wiring, new plumbing and new sloops at the front and back doors. The crews found some sew er seepage w hen the floors came up, which set work back, but have mostly caught up and by Wednesday had all the Hoots installed, all walls up, one room painted and another ready to paint "This is the first time Eve had sewer leakage on a project,” said camper Ethan Johnson, 17, of F lorence. "I had sewer leakage on my first Salkehatchic trip work site; we had to rip up the whole floor. Compared to that, this one is much easier,” said camper Taylor Stuck, 18, of Simpsonville. “But on that one we knew going in there was a sewage leak. On this one the sewage leak was a surprise; we didn’t know until we got the floor up ” Homeowner Frances Corbitt had help from her daughter putting in a request SM CAMPERS, page 16A By ANNA DOLIANITIS Staff writer The recovery aiuFeleanup effort at Japan’s Fukushuna Dai-ichi nuclear plant dev astated by the tsunami m March will take decades and tens of billions of dollars, former Nuclear Barrett Regulatory C ommission official Lake Barrett said at Thursday’s Up & Atom breakfast at the Houndslake Country Club. Barrett, an independent consultant who bus winked in nuclear energ) and nuclear materials management for more than 40 years, was the featured speaker at the Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness breakfast about the events in Fukushima and the road ahead "ll is not a public health catastrophe,” said Barrett, adding that the situation is a very' complicated one. "It is safe in Japan, it is very structured as far as food control and food safety and they should not worry about their health in Japan." The Fukushima Dm-ichi nuclear power plant, however, is in a catastrophic state, he said. It is believ ed that all of the plant’s safety systems sur-v iv ed the earthquake, hut it was the tsunami that followed - with waves IS meters high rather than the 5.7 meters prepared for - that w iped out the reactor buildings’ power for emergency cooling pumps, said Barrett. A backup system that ran on battenes w as used but nm out a Aer eight hours. Plant workers scavenged for batteries from trucks in the parking kit that were flooded, brought them into the control room ti > power instruments and used flashlights to see rn the dajk PIMM see BARRETT, page ISA :s Day Sale * NMTI MB 25% Off 25%on “•J*** ;    ~    J    Bridles    c; Locally Owned U Operated    LiT I I Ll I I LlLl #    r    JMP    I    ii    V*    I    I    V#    w BootsBridlesamlBntch^s.corn 803-643-1717    706-855-4000