Aiken Standard, April 8, 2011

Aiken Standard

April 08, 2011

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Issue date: Friday, April 8, 2011

Pages available: 38

Previous edition: Thursday, April 7, 2011

Next edition: Saturday, April 9, 2011 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

Pages available: 440,076

Years available: 1924 - 2014

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - April 8, 2011, Aiken, South Carolina U-'-'-''' 92011 MASTERS LEADERScMasters Tied-lst -7 Tled-lst -7 Tied-3rd -5 Tied-3rd Dellroy Quiros Yang -5 Tied-5th -4 Tied-Sth -4    |»^§|[)£    TODAY: South Alen glad and PGA loll-golfer Kevil Kisner (focusses the Masters MMUHX    I    tI-    §    W avid vis pro career. I us Barnes Kuchar Friday April 8,2011 Today's Weather ’%    High * * 82° !H(|r Full forecast 18C low ss® Vol. 145, No. 98 ^ our I „ora I Son pie Since ===== www £ I 807 50< Clearwater woman to fight new law on dual positions ■ Haley lauds Rep. Smith for help with legislation By ROB NOVIT Senior writer S.C. Rep. Roland Smith. R-Warren-ville. and other Aiken County I louse members joined S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley on Thursday as she signed into law a relatively minor measure that will nevertheless have a statewide impact. The measure could also affect Clearwater Water and Sewer District clerk Christy Coleman’s dual role as a commissioner for the district she works for -positions she still said on Thursday that she has no intention of giv ing up. After Coleman was elected as a commis- Coleman from creating a “master-servant” conflict by holding both positions simultaneously. However, Haley vetoed the legislation, objecting to the traditional use of local legislation that she said v lolates the state constitution. Smith agreed to support the veto. He then helped the governor write a statewide bill that added to existing state law a ban on master-servant conflicts on any county board or commission. shiner last November, Smith later filed ruth late local legislation to prohibit Colman Please see CLEARWATER, page 5A Masters draws Australians to Aiken annually <'Masters By AMY BANTON Stat! writer A group ol Australian men traveled from the outback to over yonder in the southeastern United States to enjoy not only the Masters but also Aiken, This is Craig Laundy s third visit to Aiken, and this time he brought 12 of his mates wIk> have never been . to the city before. When not watching the Masters, whether in Augusta or from the TV at the house they rented from the owner of the ( arriage House Inn. they have spent the majority of their time in the downtown area and golf courses around Aiken. The men have v isited several of the golf courses, including Woodside Plantation and Sage Valley They also immensely enjoy the Holley House at Hotel Aiken. Laundy said his friends place a lot of trust in him to plan this trip, which was put together by feed Up Golf Tours. “Oley now understand why I love the town so much,” laiundy said. “We prefer this town. We like the PIMM see AUSSIES, page 5A Staff photo by Haley Hughes Aiken County Administrator Clay Killian and Building and Grounds Maintenance Supervisor Kip Gunter discuss the Coca-Cola property. Gunter said he is receiving bids for blinding material to be placed along the fence line to shield the residents from the flashing lights of an ambulance. Repairs under way at future home of Aiken County EMS AP photo Rory Mdlroy of Northern Ireland walks up the 15th fairway during the first round of the Masters golf tournament Mdlroy is tied for first at 65 with Alvaro Quiros. Woods SHI draws a crowd | LB MdbugQufcoe tied for first | IB mm jl  nnhnnlr I ! inasters iioteoooK I jl i By HALEY HUGHES Staff writer There is still work to be done on the former Coca-Cola bottling plant before Aiken County LMS moves in. Before any major renovations and modifications can take place, a decision has to be made: Where will the paramedics and LMTs sleep and shower while working their shifts? A portion of the 4,000 square feet of shop and maintenance warehouse space could do the job, said County Administrator I lay Killian as he walked around the area Thursday. There is plenty of space to accommodate the living quarters, and the warehouse already has plumbing connections. “This building will be very functional tor what we want to do,” he said. In November, Aiken County Council approved a contract to purchase the York Street building and an adjoining lot for the future home of emergency medical sen ices. The contract was for SH 10,000 for the plant and S140,000 for a vacant lot that sits behind the building beyond the fence line. About half of the purchase price - or $400,000 - came from the current round of Capital Projects Sales Tax and the rest from a capital fund. The plant sits on 2.6 fenced-in acres. There is 2,850 square feet of finished office space downstairs with 4,(HH) square feet of shop and maintenance area and four loading docks. There is also a detached warehouse of more than 8,000 square feet. The second floor could be used as training classrooms or storage. Aiken County LMS currently operates out of the basement of the County Complex. Already, in-house staff’ has repaired and/or replaced all exterior lights, checked the building’s heating and air units ami connected it w uh brand new power sen ice. The existing flooring containing asbestos was ripped out of the finished front office space, and, once it is replaced, PIMM SM EMS. page SA area aaifliB CNTA exec: Nuclear industry safer than desk work Coe Purvis Strain, Aiken Donald W. Cames, Ridge Spring Lula Mae Brunson, Aiken Mildred f. Douglas, New Ellenton Thomas L Emanuel, Aiken . Deaths and Funerals 16A Ltaeftih) Calendar 3C Classifieds ID Crossword 3C Comics 4C Dear Abby SC Horoscopes SC Markets 4B Movie Listings 3C Nation/World 14A Obituaries 6A Opinions 15A Pualt$ SA Sports IB TV Listings 2C By ANNA DOLIANITIS Staff writer Citizens for Nuclear Technology Aw arencss hxeculiv e Director Clint Wolfe enlisted the help of musician Stevie Wonder Thursday morning to explain the basics of nuclear energy to the ladies of the Town St Country Club. Many myth-* and misconceptions related to nuclear energy exist, Wolfe said, as Wonder’s voice sang the words “When you believe in things that you don’t under stand, then you suffer ...    , superstition ain’t the way." “We’ve got to dissociate nuclear weaponry from nuclear energy,” Wolfe said. “They are not the same, and they do not deserve to cany each others* baggage" Many believe that nuclear power plants are a significant source of Americans’ Wolfe yearly exposure, Wolfe said, though the exposure from nuclear power plants is about .(JCS percent of the av erage American’s annual radiation exposure - comparable to the amount of radiation received from eating one banana per year. Nuclear power plants do not pose a nsk to the surrounding community, have an exclusion /one of 1,1)00 feet per Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements and do not pose safety risks the way that other forms of energy do, he said. "The nuclear industry is safer than working in a hank, in a real estate office or any other type of office job,” Wolfe said. He said that nobody has been killed as a result of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States, but fossil fuel-related deaths have occurred from coal mine disasters and natural gas explosions. Wolfe held up a small, mmt-sized fuel pellet and told tlv w omen that the single pellet can satisfy an mdi-vidual’s energy needs for IO or 11 months. It the fuel pellet were to be recycled, four pellets would last a lifetime -something Wolfe said would result in IOO tons of waste if taken from coal burning “The materials we have now will all fit tai a football field,” he Naid. “It is best to get it disposed, but we can store it safely.” Wolfe said that the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl and PIMM SM CNTA, page 16A ||l ll HIM Jill |ij400W0W"*I Southlawn Cemetery & Mausoleum , I i ken’s Ftvmicri cun'tm Considering Cremation? For A Limit**! Time    Receive Two    Cremat Niches For The * Of One! (Xiii id og jjueaj rallye instil ss on!' title! Mi) lf WJllurtil notice*} J*/ot hie yon nml ■ -’■** » * Fence of Mi mi through I*renrrnugement Save Today* (gQffl (>41-KHOO 45:14 Whiskey Hoad, Aiken, St IhHOd ;