Aiken Standard, December 6, 1989 : Front Page

Publication: Aiken Standard December 6, 1989

Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - December 6, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Page 2A Economists Are Expecting Slowdown Page IB Candle Vigil Held At Langley Pond AIKIN COUNTY PUBLIC JNTlNj^BUC *tu»oai Wednesday, December 6, 1989    25c    Aiken,    South    Caroling    Vol.    122    No.    308 Rattled Aquino Calls For Public Support Festive Private Operator Suggested For Jail Christmas Countdown BE JOLLY, PJ/ ONLY 19»\ys . LEFT/  Os. Ok Thompson, Ware Head All-Americans Page IOA A Quick Read Ending Is Happy For Divided Lovers FARMINGTON, N.H. (AP) - A Finnish exchange student is being allowed to return to his American sweetheart three weeks after he was forcibly transferred to another state because they spent too much time together, a legislator says. “I’m so excited,” 17-year-old Kelly LaPointe said Tuesday night after learning she and Iiro Lehtinen will be together again. State Rep. William Tsiros said he got “the good news” Tuesday evening from the regional director of the Education Foundation for Foreign Study. The organization had transferred the 18-year-old to South Portland, Maine, because they said he wasn’t spending enough time with his host family in Farmington. Because of the separation, Farmington High School students boycotted classes for one day. Fast Food Serious For Taco Teacher PULLMAN, Wash. (AP) - Fast food is serious stuff to Don Smith, the Taco Bell Distinguished Professor at Washington State University. There are no easy A’s in Burger Flipping 101 here. Fast food is big business, Smith said, with $60 billion in annual sales. And that is of more than academic interest to his students. Graduates of Smith’s program leave with five or six career offers, he said, with salaries starting at $20,000 a year and rising to more than $30,000 after three years. Weather Rain Likely A 30 percent chance of rain and cloudy skies are forecast tonight with a low in the mid 40s. Tomorrow will be cloudy, cool with occassional rain and a high in the low 50s. There is an 80 percent chance of rain. Please see Page 5B for details. Deaths Grace R. Autry, Ward Shelba T. Fowler, Aiken Geraldine Frazier, North Augusta Abraham J. Jones, Jackson Eula McCormick, North Augusta Everlena Miller, Graniteville Annie Joyce Rye, Clearwater Please see Page 5B for details. Inside Today Bridge...............................................5D Calendar............................................1C Classifieds.........................................3D Comics..............................................2D Crossword .....................................6D Cryptoquote.......................................4D Dear Abby..........................................2D Local Front........................................1B Obituaries.........................................5B Opinions............................................ID Sports..............................................10A Television..........................................2D Weather.............................................5B Holiday Fund Donations Help Needy Families Christmas fund drives are well under way in Aiken County. The Salvation Army’s annual kettle drive is under way, with the familiar bell-ringers stationed at locations throughout the Aiken area. Contributions may be mailed to The Salvation Army, P.O. Box 439, Aiken, 29802. The seventeenth annual Valley Empty Stocking Fund campaign is also gearing up for the holidays. The fund is sponsored by several area civic clubs, including the Lang-ley-Bath-Clearwater American Legion Post 153, Samuel Swint Post 77 of the American Legion, and the L.B.C. Lions Club, as well as individuals. Last year, the fund helped 243 families — a total of 783 people. Contributions to the fund may be mailed to: P.O. Box 517, Langley, 29834; P.O. Box 354, Clearwater, 29822; or P.O. Box 391, Graniteville, 29829. (Please See HOLIDAY, Page 6A) SCE&G Workers Decide New Contract By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer Wages, health care costs, clothing allowances and work rules dominate a union contract vote scheduled to end Thursday for about 985 workers of the South Carolina Electric and Gas Co. A spokesman for the utility said the majority of the vote, which began Monday, is being taken in Charleston and Columbia and involves members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. The spokesman said the company has reached contract agreements with its carpenters and bus drivers — slightly more than 200 workers represented by unions outside the IBEW umbrella. Cathy B. Novinger, senior vice president of SCE&G, said the main issues involved in the IBEW vote is a 3.75 percent wage increase offered by the company and sharing of health care costs. The company, which operates its own insurance program, is asking that workers, who now pay 17 percent of costs, pay a larger share of premiums. She did not say what the company has suggested in the way of an increase. In response, the union is asking a 4 percent wage hike and wants worker share of the insurance costs frozen at 17 percent. Mrs. Novinger said rapidly escalating health care costs are creating problems for many companies and employees working on contracts, and “we can’t lock in and say you (workers) are never going to have to pay for health care.” (Please See SCE&G, Page 6A) From Wire Reports Twenty workers at the troubled Savannah River Site were exposed to more than 21 times the nuclear weapons plant’s average employee radiation dose, a 1988 radiation report showed. The report by the plant found that the Savannah River Site average radiation dose — for 5,899 construction workers and 8,726 operations employees —last year was 66 millirems, even though the 20 received more than 1,390 millirems last year. The amount of radiation dosage a person receives is measured in millirems. A person, for example, receives between 20 and 30 millirems from a normal chest X-ray. People commonly receive additional millirems through natural, medical and consumer radiation. The report examined radiation doses in work areas such as reactors, chemical separations and manufacturing. It showed that employees who work in high radiation areas received doses exceeding the plant average, which is lowered because any person who may enter a radia tion area is considered in calculations. According to the study, the maximum dose received by any operations employee was 1,590 millirems, while one construction employee received 2,040 millirems, nearly 31 times the plant average. The Savannah River Site’s individual exposure limit is 3,000 millirems per year, while the federal individual limit is 5,000 millirems per year. “All the studies done on radiation ... show that the federal limit is considered (Please See SRS, Page 6A) Rebel Forces Free Trapped Americans By ROBERT H. REID Associated Press Writer MANILA, Philippines — A beleaguered President Corazon Aquino declared a state of national emergency today and pleaded with fellow Filipinos to defy the hundreds of mutinous soldiers who ‘‘want to kill me.” The declaration came after a cease-fire between rebel and loyalist troops enabled about 1,800 foreigners, hundreds of them Americans, to be evacuated from Manila’s financial district, scene of heavy fighting since Saturday. The rebels, angered at U.S. military support for Mrs. Aquino, had on Tuesday threatened to prevent some Americans from leaving. Today, they issued a veiled threat against those who remain in the country. After the evacuation, rebel and military representatives then opened talks for a peaceful settlement of the crisis. Mrs. Aquino had previously vowed not to negotiate, demanding that the rebels “surrender or die.” She had also over ruled recommendations from Cabinet members two days ago to declare a state of emergency. ‘‘You, my beloved countrymen, I depend on you,” the obviously strained and fatigued Mrs. Aquino said on natonal television before declaring the emergency. She appealed for a show of “people power” in the streets on Friday similar to the 1986 demonstrations that helped put her in office. The plea came five days after thousands of mutineers launched the strongest attempt yet to topple Mrs. Aquino’s administration, which has been widely criticized as indecisive and inept. It was unclear what specific powers Mrs. Aquino would be able to wield under the emergency declaration. Press Secretary Adolfo Azcuna said the government planned to take over utilities and transport but not the media. Sen. John Osmena said most of the 23 senators endorsed the move and he expected Congress to grant Mrs. Aquino sweeping powers. But opposition Rep. Salvador Britannic© said it would discourage foreign investment and tourism: “The opposition believes that it is a first step...toward the declaration of martial law. (Please See RATTLED, Page 6A) AP Laserphoto SAYING GOODBYE: Tanya Natzke of San Francisco talks with rebel soldiers as shes leaves the Intercontintental Hotel in Manila. By CARL LANGLEY Staff Wister Rep. Charles Sharpe, R-Wagener, presented Aiken County Council with a proposal Tuesday night that it take a close look at hiring a private company to operate its detention center. “It’s working every place else, and I don’t see any reason it won’t work here,” said Rep. Sharpe about the so-called “privatization” of prisons and other county services. The Wagener lawmaker gave County Council members a stack of documents that he said outlined the success of one company — Corrections Corporation of America — in operating prisons for local governments. Rep. Sharpe and other lawmakers met ‘ with County Council members in their annual pre-legislative session on the USC-Aiken campus. “The county could save as much as $24 million from the start,” said Rep. Sharpe, referring to one speculated cost of constructing a new county detention center equipped with various law enforcement offices. Because of growing prison populations and a threat of lawsuits stemming from overcrowded conditions, Aiken County is looking at proposals for a new jail. Several years ago a state inmate sued the Department of Corrections, claiming Local Option Taxes.....................Page    IB Court Fines................................Page    1B Road Paving...............................Page    2B that overcrowding amounted to cruel and unusual punishment. The inmate won an out-of-court settlement that set off a prison-building binge by the state. Aiken County officials have been warned the same thing could happen locally at a facility built for 105, but which in recent months has recorded daily populations exceeding 200. While the $24 million price tag was mentioned at the high end of the prison building scale, Council Chairman Carrol H. Warner has declared the county cannot — and will not — spend that kind of money for a detention center. Other estimates on the cost of a new jail range from $15 million up depending on needs. Rep. Sharpe said one advantage in using a private company is that the county could take over the entire operation after two or three years if it feels the cost of a private contract is not justified. “That would have to be written into the contract, but I don’t see that as a big problem,” said the lawmaker. (Please See PRIVATE, Page 6A) SRS Radiation Within Safe Limits Staff Photo By Scott Webster DOLL HOUSE DOLLS: Margaret Law, 5, and Peter Jackson, 4, look as festive as the decorations in the Doll House in Hopeland Gardens in Aiken. The Doll House is open from 2-5 p.m. every Sunday through Dec. 17. ;

  • Adolfo Azcuna
  • Aiken Geraldine Frazier
  • Augusta Abraham J. Jones
  • Carl Langley
  • Carl Langley Staff Wister
  • Cathy B. Novinger
  • Charles Sharpe
  • Corazon Aquino
  • Don Smith
  • Grace R. Autry
  • Graniteville Annie Joyce Rye
  • Iiro Lehtinen
  • Jackson Eula Mccormick
  • John Osmena
  • Margaret Law
  • Peter Jackson
  • Samuel Swint
  • Scott Webster
  • Tanya Natzke
  • Ward Shelba T. Fowler
  • William Tsiros

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Publication: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

Issue Date: December 6, 1989

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