Aiken Standard, November 18, 1989 : Front Page

Publication: Aiken Standard November 18, 1989

Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - November 18, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Sports Pre-Summit Dialogue/Page 2A SATURDAY Merit Pay Endorsed/Page 7A Al a; November 18, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Silver Bluff...............271 Senate Backs Off On Granting Hefty Pay Raises .    I    By STEVEN KOMAROW North Augusta...........20    Associated    Press    Writer AlfP°rt...................IO    WASHINGTON    - The Senate late Fri- lAttarw'll    I    a    I    day endorsed but got cold feet and Jonesville................14    backed away from a congressional pay Williston-Fllrn    17    raise of more than $30,000 - forcing lead- ti rn rn un CIKO............IO    ere to puU the plan off the floor and offer Hilton Head..............27    with    8    morc    gradual Strom Thurmond ..    6    ^oome    apparent    that    a major- —-.. ....... tty of membes of the Senate are op- IfirrJ Rorkolau    lo    I    posed,’’ said Majority Leader George Lord Berkeley............19    j    MitcheU, D-Maine, announcing he was Wardlow............ 13    Withdrawing his proposal to have the Sen ate accept the same raise passed by the House. Mitchell proposed, as a fallback, that A Quick Read South Carolina Fans Win Great Food Fight CHARLESTON (AP) — University of South Carolina football fans won the second annual Great Carolina-Clemson Food Fight Friday by donating almost 25,000 cans of food to charity over a four-week period. South Carolina fans donated 24,970 pounds of food and Clemson fans donated 23,660 pounds. The Food Fight is a statewide project to see which team’s supporters can raise the most food for the state’s needy. It is sponsored by Piggly Wiggly of Carolina, First Federal of South Carolina, The Palmetto Project and the S.C. Association of Sportswriters. The contest ran for four weeks leading up to the South Carolina-Clemson football game. The final score will be announced at Saturday night’s game. This year’s total of almost 50,000 I pounds of food almost doubles last year’s 27,000 pound-total. The food wiU be distributed to needy famiUes in each county by the respective community action agencies in time for Thanksgiving. Vie! Refugee Wins $6 Million Lottery COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - A Vietnamese refugee who won $6 million in an Ohio Lottery game didn’t show up for work Friday. The company official who hired him says he understands and wishes him weU. WiUiam Snyder, personnel director at HFI Inc., said he hasn’t been able to talk to Anhtinh Ton Giang, 23, since employees learned Thursday that Giang had the winning ticket in Wednesday night’s Super Lotto drawing. Giang told The Columbus Dispatch he wanted to quit his $5.75-an-hour sewing job at the company, which makes interior trim for automobiles. “I don’t blame him at all,” said Synder. ‘‘I tried to congratulate him last night and couldn’t reach him.” Giang will receive $240,000 a year, after taxes, for 20 years. the Senate take only a 9.7 percent pay raise for itself, billed as a cost-of-living adjustment. With the smaller raise, the bill’s key ethics provision — elimination of speech honoraria in 1991 — would take place more slowly for the Senate. I believe it to be an unwise decision for the Senate” to follow the lead of the House, Mitchell said. Mitchell’s announcement came only short while after the Senate, by a vote of 65-34, had killed a move by Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., strip the pay raise provisions from the bill as passed by the House. Mitchell said he hoped the Senate would allow the House, federal judges, and government executives to still get the full raise the House approved. The House approved a bill Thursday under which congressional pay should current $89’500 t0 at least $120,800 and probably closer to $125,000. Mitchell and Republican Leader Bob U)le of Ransas argued through the day for the Senate to take the full raise. “If the voters in our states look at what we do, if we work hard, have a complete disclosure of our assets, our speaking fees, then they can make the final judgment,” Dole said. “The need for Congress to come to grips with the ethics issue is evident. Llc„ opmion demands it,” said Mitchell. Helms argued that the bill was being “rammed through.” The public won’t accept the argument that ethics can be reformed only if members get more pay, he said. “Mr. Joe Lunchbucket is going to stand there and thumb his nose at any congressman who says that,” he said. Even as they were announcing their intentions on Friday afternoon to follow the House example, Senate leaders were still drafting their version of the legislation. With President Bush’s support, the House voted 252-174 on Thursday to raise its pay and that of other top government officials for the first time since early 1987. (Please See SENATE, Page HA) Weather Partly Cloudy, Cool Partly cloudy skies are forecast today. The high will be in the 60s. Tomorrow will be mostly cloudy. The low will be in the 30s with a high in the mid 50s. Please see Page 6A for details. Deaths James A. Johnson, Graniteville Please see Page 6A for details. Inside Today Bridge...............................................7B Calendar..........................................12B Classifieds.........................................5B Comics ......................................9A Cryptoquote.......................................6B Dear Abby..........................................9A Local Front........................................7    A Obituaries..........................................6A Opinions............................................4A Sports................................................7    A Stocks.............................................10A Television..........................................9A Weather.............................................6A USG, Clemson — Down To The Game View Changes For Muir But Aura Remains By MICHAEL SHADY Staff Sports Writer Warren Muir has seen the Clemson-South Carolina battle from two distinct point of views. As a standout fullback for the USC during the 1967-69 seasons, Muir received some first-hand insight into this intense rivalry. While growing up in Fitchburg, Mass., Muir probably couldn’t even {H)int to where Clemson was on the map, or had never heard of the Fighting Gamecocks. He sure as heck never dreamed he would .someday be a part of all this business. But upon his arrival in Columbia after spending a year at West Point, Muir soon discovered that taking care of the Tigers was the number one thing — if not the only thing — on the Gamecock football agenda. “I didn’t know of the Carolina-Clemson rivalry until I got to Columbia,” Muir said, “And I found out quickly how important it was.” Twenty years later — as a Carolina alumnus and business person in the CSRA — Muir is still an active participant in this little annual get-together, but nowadays, he makes his contribution from the stands, not on the field. And despite the change in perspective, the aura around the Clemson-Carolina game remains the same. “I don’t think it has changed over the years,” Muir said. “It’s still the big game for the two schools.” Not so big for Muir, however, that the desire to defeat the dreaded Tigers becomes the sole objective for the Gamecocks. Indeed, Muir is not at all like the several fans who feel a losing USC season is salvaged with a victory over Clemson. ‘There are people who believe that tnat wa Mayor Weeks Anticipates 63rd Straight By KENZIE WINSTEAD Staff Sports Writer Longtime Aiken Mayor H. Odell Weeks knows where he’ll be Saturday night at 7:30 — and anyone who knows him does, too. When his beloved Tigers hit the field against South Carolina at Williams-Brice Stadium in Columbia, Weeks will be watching his 63rd consecutive Clemson-Carolina game. “I guess I’ve been lucky,” said Weeks, now 81, one of the most staunch Clemson sup-porters in Aiken County. A member of the 1925 Aiken High football team, Weeks saw his first Clemson-Carolina game in 1926, his first year at Clemson. He eventually earned his degree from Clemson in 1930. Staff Photo By David Kidwell OPPOSITE SIDES: When Warren Muir (left) played fullback for the USC Gamecocks 20 years ago, Mayor H. Odell Weeks was there. They’ll both be there tonight, Mayor Weeks for the 63rd straight year and Muir as a fan on the opposite side of the field. but I’m not way,” he said. “Of course, I’d always like to beat Clemson, but I’d like the team to be successful.” Muir is also concerned with those Gamecock supporters who take the whole thing a bit too seriously. “Well, you know, you got fanatics and (Please See VIEW, Page 11A) Back then, Clemson (then known as Clemson A&M) was a small military school with about 1,200 cadets and the game was played on “Big Thursday” at the Fairgrounds in Columbia at its current site. The South Carolina State Fair was held in conjunction with the Clemson-Carolina game. “People would come from all over South Carolina to the fair,” said Weeks. “It was an early game. You could park all around the fairgrounds.” Weeks said fans would take in some of the fair before and after the big game. Since then, of course, Clemson has built one of the largest college stadiums in the South and the game is played on a home-and-home basis, “which is better — absolutely. The people in Clemson thought it should be,” said Weeks. USC also has constructed a new state-of-the-art football stadium. (Please See MAYOR, Page HA) Former Governors Agree Education Key To Growth By ELIZABETH GROAT Associated Press Writer COLUMBIA — Eight South Carolina governors discussed on Friday the politi-cal changes that marked their combined 40 years in office, and all agreed education is the key to the state’s continued ^ growth. Sens. Strom Thurmond and Ernest Hol-lings, both former gov- __ ernors, joined current    JR Gov. Carroll Campbell    * and five others via sat-ellite from Washington. About IOO others attended the roundtable talk, held at Columbia College and sponsored by The Palmetto Project. George Timmerman Jr., who served as the Palmetto State’s top elected official from 1955-59 and is now an Aiken County circuit judge, was unable to attend. The governors said education has increased economic and social growth in South Carolina, and they called for more programs and training to increase the strength of the state’s workforce. John West, governor from 1971-75, said he recalled a survey in the 1950s that said one-third of South Carolina’s adults were illiterate. “That challenge was met with two things — education programs and an effort to bring things to South Carolina,” he said. He cited Hollings, who was in office from 1959-63, and Donald Russell, who served from 1963-65 and is now a Spartanburg County circuit judge, for their instrumental roles in desegregating Clemson University. “We recognized we had to develop a comprehensive system that would allow everyone to participate,” added Robert McNair, governor from 1965-71 and now head of a large Columbia law firm. (Please See FORMER, Page HA) Three local Teams Advance In Prep Football Playoffs From Staff Reports There is still life for three Aiken County high school football teams in the state playoffs, but three other local teams weren’t as fortunate Friday night. Aiken, Silver Bluff and North Augusta each advanced in playoff action Friday night but Strom Thurmond, Wardlaw Academy and Williston-Elko weren’t as lucky. Here’s a rundown on how the local teams fared Friday night: ^ Aiken walked ail over St. John’s of Darlington 44-6 before the home folks at Hagood stadium. The Hornets ran for more than 400 yards and improved to 10-2. Aiken will host Beaufort next week. North Augusta advanced to the finals of Ole upper state in Class AAAA Division II with a 20-10 win at Airport, the Jackets’ second win over the Eagles. The Jackets, 6-7, will take next week off before continuing the playoffs. ✓ For the second consecutive year, Silver Bluff ripped Loris in the playoffs. This year, the Bulldogs, now 10-1, won 27-6. The Bulldogs will take next week off before continuing their state title hunt. Strom Thurmond fell behind Hilton Head early and couldn’t recover in the first round of the Class AAA playoffs, 27-6. The Rebels finished at 10-2. ✓ No. I Williston-Elko saw its dream season end at Jonesville, 14-13. The Blue Devils finished the season at 12-1. ^ Wardlaw Academy lost in the championship game of the South Carolina Independent School Athletic Association to Lord Berkeley, 19-13. Please see Pages IB and 2B for complete results. ;

  • Carroll Campbell
  • David Kidwell
  • Donald Russell
  • George Timmerman Jr.
  • James A. Johnson
  • Jesse Helms
  • Joe Lunchbucket
  • John West
  • Robert Mcnair
  • Steven Komarow
  • Strom Thurmond
  • Warren Muir
  • Wiuiam Snyder

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Publication: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

Issue Date: November 18, 1989

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