Aiken Standard, October 28, 1989

Aiken Standard

October 28, 1989

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Issue date: Saturday, October 28, 1989

Pages available: 24

Previous edition: Friday, October 27, 1989

Next edition: Sunday, October 29, 1989

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - October 28, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Prep ScoresFederal Deficit Climbs/Page 2A SATURDAY Aiken....................14 HH-Roberts...............0 North Augusta...........31 Brookland-Cayce..........7 Silver Bluff...............25 Jasper County.............0 Strom Thurmond.........59 Keenan...................3 Wardlaw................40 Andrew Jackson...........0 North....................36 Wagener-Salley...........0 Irmo.....................17 Midland Valley............7 RS-Monetta..............35 Pelion....................0 A Quick Read Girl Burned By Gas Used For Head Lice PENDLETON (AP) — A 5-year-old girl burned over 25 percent of her body when her mother used gasoline as a treatment for head lice remained in critical condition Friday. Police continued to investigate the incident but charges are unlikely, Police Chief James Cleveland said. “I don’t believe any intentional harm was meant,” he said. ‘‘It still looks purely accidental.” Crystal Kilgore was at Humana Burn Center in Augusta, with second-and third-degree burns (Mi her head, hands, neck, back and arms, Pendleton police said. On Wednesday, the child’s mother, Mary Kilgore, put gasoline on the child’s head, then took her through the kitchen to rinse her hair in the sink. On the way, the child got close to the gas stove and her hair caught fire. FBI: Iowa Explosion Evidence Inconclusive WASHINGTON (AP) - The FBI said Friday its laboratory studies of the USS Iowa disaster found no evidence that any device was deliberately used to detonate the blast that killed 47 sailors. “We didn’t find anything that would lead us to conclude that a device was used to prematurely detonate the charge,” FBI spokesman Mike Kortan said. “That’s not to say something wasn’t there. Our findings were inconclusive,” he said. But the chairman of the House Armed Services investigations subcommittee said he reads the FBI’s laboratory report as undermining die Navy’s findings of evidence suggesting a detonating device caused the blast. “The FBI’s lab report has been described as inconclusive,” Rep. Nicholas Mavroules, D-Mass., said in a letter. “I do not see it that way.” “It clearly says that they did not find elements that the Navy technicians said they found,” Mavroules wrote in a letter to Rep. Mary Rose Oakar, D-Ohio. Weather Sunny And Warm Clear skies are forecast today and tonight. The low will be in the mid to upper 40s. Tomorrow will be sunny and warm. The high will be in the upper 70s. Please see Page 6A for details. Inside Today Calendar..........................................12B Classifieds.........................................6B Comics..............................................5B Crossword.........................................9B Cryptoquote.......................................7B Dear Abby..........................................5B Local Front........................................9A Obituaries..........................................6A Opinions............................................4A Sports................................................1B Stocks...............................................8A Television..........................................5B Weather.............................................6A October 28, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 269 BaysBall Back: 'We Need A Respite' By CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN Associated Press Writer SAN FRANCLSCX) — The Bay area turned its attention back to baseball Friday, looking for a break from IO days of earthquake cleanup and strain. The Bay Bridge World ISeries, its symbol now fractured by the quake, resumed at Candlestick Park, renamed “Wiggly Field” by one wag. For some, the jokes making the rounds and the ballgame itself were a kind of therapy in the wake of the deadly quake. “I think it’s my attempt to conquer my own fears,” Steven Walch said of his decision to attend the game. Having seen Candlestick shudder and crack, he added, “I want to be at the World Series, and I don’t think it’s more unsafe ... than any other place. Ami I want to get back to my normal life.” The organizers of the game tried to help. They gave the ceremonial job of throwing out the first ball to rescue workers, police, firefighters and heroes of the quake. “We’ve realized we need all this. Baseball can be part of this area’s mental therapy,” said Giants manager Roger Craig. “Baseball is the most resilient of all American institutions,” said Commissioner Fay Vincent, who announced a $1.4 million gift from baseball to earthquake relief. Dave Stewart, starting pitcher for the Oakland Athletics, said the players have had difficulty preparing for the game. “We’ve all been through a national tragedy. I’m sure I’m not alone, but the earthquake had a deep psychological effect on me,” Stewart said. San Francisco Giants outfielder Brett Butler said the game gave 62,000 fans “a chance to let out all that frustration and hurt and trauma. This is America’s game. It’s going to bring all of us in this area back together again.” (Please See BAYSBALL, Page 7A) A’s Rock Giants, 13-7 The Oakland A’s hit a record five home runs, including two by Dave Henderson, and took a 3*0 lead in the World Series last night. Dave Stewart outpitched Scott Garretts for the win and now stands 4-0 in postseason. For the story, please see Page 1B. AP Lauerphoto THUMBS UP: Flanked by host Oscar Arias and his wife, Margarita, President Bush gives a thumbs up sign as he arrives for Western Hemisphere talks. Advisers Say Watkins May Be Moving Too Quickly To Restart SRS Reactors By ROBERT BURNS Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON - The Energy Department may be moving too quickly to restart nuclear reactors that produce material for nuclear warheads and reactor managers may not be emphasizing safety enough, advisers told Energy Secretary James D. Watkins on Friday. In a letter to Watkins, members of the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Facility Safety said that while prospects for a safe resump tion of production at the Savannah River Site had improved recently, they were concerned that reactor operators were not being trained in “reactor fundamentals” like commercial reactor operators. The operators are employed by Westinghouse Corp., which runs Savannah River Site under contract. The letter did not detail what the advisers meant by reactor fundamentals. The reactors produce tritium, a gas, and are similar in basic design to most civilian power reactors, though they operate at much lower temperatures and pressures. “That this omission will remain through restart may belie Westinghouse’s claim that safety is their primary concern and that early restart of the reactors is not the driving factor in training,” the letter said. The three Savannah River Site reactors, built for the government in the early 1950s, were shut down more than 11/2 years ago because of mechanical problems and safety concerns. (Please See ADVISERS, Page 7A) Peace Pledge In Nicaragua Ends Quickly By TERENCE HUNT AP White House Correspondent SAN JOSE, Costa Rica — President Bush sat down for talks with leaders of Western Hemisphere nations Friday and exchanged a “friendly” handshake with Daniel Ortega, the leftist president of Nicaragua the United States wants removed from power. “I told President Bush that my government supports the electoral process and that we are working for peace in Nicaragua,” Ortega said after the opening of a two-day discussion on drugs, debt and the march of democracy through the hemisphere. Bush said in reply, according to Ortega, that he would “support the will of the Nicaraguan people,” who vote in elections Feb. 25. The handshake took place out of view of the public. Later, a Nicaraguan official said Ortega has decided to end the 20-month-old cease-fire with Contra rebels. Manuel Espinosa, Ortega’s press secretary, said, “The official announcement will be made Saturday.” White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater said in response, “We find it incredible.” Secretary of State James Baker III said, “I hope it’s not true.” Baker said Ortega had not mentioned it in talks with the other leaders. Bush arrived in this capital to cheers when he declared, “I believe we can create here in the Americas the world’s first completely democratic hemisphere. ” An extraordinary security force — 4,000 strong — was deployed to protect the leaders at the two-day “celebration of democracy” arranged by Costa Rica’s President Oscar Arias. The Secret Service imported a two-inch-thick, 75-foot long sheet of bulletproof glass in front of the National Museum for Saturday’s inauguration of Democracy Plaza to protect Bush, Colombian President Virgilio Barco and the others. Barco’s life has been threatened by drug barons in his country. “We must do away with all the dictatorships in America because there will be no peace among us while even one of them remains,” Arias said in welcoming his guests. “There can be no tranquility for our people when one government lends itself to hiding corruption and distributing drugs,” Ik said in an apparent reference to Panama, whose leaders were not invited to attend. (Please See PEACE, PagefA) Time Change Returns That Lost Hour By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON — Folks who have been a bit tired all summer will finally get back that lost hour of sleep this weekend, with the return of standard time. The time change occurs officially at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, the moment when clocks should be set back an hour. That switch provides the extra hour for sleep, carousing, toil or whatever, that was lost last spring when the clocks were moved ahead. The International Association of Fire Chiefs is trying to get Americans to use a bit of the extra time for the potentially life-saving act of replacing batteries in smoke detectors in their homes. The change to standard time moves an hour of daylight from the evening to the morning. That means it will get dark earlier at night, but there will be more light in the mornings. The earlier darkness is also a safety consideration for parents whose children will be going out on Halloween night, and for anyone driving in the dim light. The change affects most Americans, Daylight Saving Time Ends Oct. 29 Bechtel Bay Operations Escape Major Damages Staff Graphic by Melissa Culp although a few areas do not change to daylight time in the spring and, thus, don’t have to go back in the fall. These include include Arizona, Hawaii, parts of Indiana, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and American Samoa. The date of the change is set by Congress, and while it’s become a tradition for most of the nation, the notion of standard time is only just over a century old. Before that, every local city and town had its own time, setting the town clock according to the sun and expecting residents to coordinate their watches and clocks with that standard. (Please See TIME, Page 7A) By BUDDY WALLER Staff Writer Although the Bechtel Group’s four-story computer operations building sustained structural damage in last week’s San Francisco area earthquake, the company’s adjacent 23- and 34-story skyscrapers came through the disaster virtually unscathed, according to a Bechtel spokesman. Given the severity of the quake, “it could have been far worse than it was,” said Rick Laubscher, Bechtel’s assistant manager of public relations. A Bechtel division, Bechtel Savannah River Inc., is the chief subcontractor at the Savannah River Site. The computer facility, built in the 1920s as a warehouse, had structural damage, but a senior Bechtel structural engineer, Bill White, examined it and determined it was “superficial,” according to Laubscher. White said Thursday an exterior wall of the computer building is cracked and has a hole big enough to put a fist through; the building also has cracks in the back of the stairwell and elevator shafts. Still, the building has “a lot of lateral load resistance” and “is not a collapse hazard,” White added. In Bechtel’s two high-rise buildings, there was nothing more than some cracked plaster in the stairwells, Laubscher said. The three buildings form Bechtel’s headquarters. The 23-story skyscraper was built in 1968 and the 34-story one in 1974. Laubscher said both of the newer buildings were constructed “to the highest standards of the time. ” He mentioned that in his office on the 19th floor, the only damage was that a flower arrangement fell off a shelf. “All the pictures stayed on the walls. No furniture or anything went over.” After the earthquake hit, “we did move the computer information (operations) to a prearranged backup facility in Philadelphia,” Laubscher noted. In addition, because Bechtel was being “very, very conservative about this,” most of the employees in the computer building were moved into the high-rises, he said. This involved about IOO of Bechtel’s 3,500 employees in San Francisco, he added. Wliite said access to the second, third and fourth floors of the computer building is now limited to a skeleton crew of essential personnel. (Please See BECHTEL, Page 7A) ;

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