Aiken Standard, October 21, 1989

Aiken Standard

October 21, 1989

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Issue date: Saturday, October 21, 1989

Pages available: 24

Previous edition: Friday, October 20, 1989

Next edition: Sunday, October 22, 1989

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - October 21, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Prep Scores Aiken................... Thurmond............... South Aiken............. Keenan ................. Greenwood............. Midland Valley.......... ..3 North Augusta.......... 14 Orangeburg-Wilkinson.. ..7 Silver Bluff.............. 17 Edisto................... Wagener-Salley......... 34 H-K-Tyler............... .17 Williston-Elko........... .33 RS-Monetta............. .17 A Quick Read Robber Tips Victim For Being Generous DULUTH, Minn. (AP) — A security systems owner says he was robbed at knifepoint by a woman who took about $200, but gave him $20 back and thanked him for being “most generous.” ‘‘I got a tip for being robbed,” Charles Grubb said Thursday. Grubb, who sells security systems for homes and businesses, said he’ll use his experience in his sales pitch. “The message is,” he said, “it can happen to anyone.” Mickey Mouse Bock In Soviet Comics MOSCOW (AP) — Mickey Mouse is coming back to the Soviet Union, this time in the form of comic books. According to a report Friday in the newspaper Trad, the Walt Disney character will appear in Russian language comic books published by a Soviet-Danish joint venture. The comic will be issued four times a year by the Soviet publisher of Physical Culture and Sports and Guttenberg!)^, an international subsidiary of Disney, Trad said. Woollies On Winter: Early Kick, Late Bite BEATTYVILLE, Ky. (AP) - Who needs the National Weather Service with Rosemary Kilduff around to keep an eye on woolly worms. The Beattyville woman Friday predicted in an annual survey that winter in central Appalachia will have an early kick and a late bite, because the fuzzy caterpillars were mostly black on the ends and brown in the middle. Mrs. Kilduff said her forecasts are “remarkably accurate.” Last year, she predicted a milder than usual winter that proved to be true. Weather Mostly Sunny Mostly sunny skies are forecast today. Tomorrow will be partly cloudy and cold. The high will be in the 60s and the low will be in the 30s. Please see Page 7A for details. Deaths Inez Lawter, Ware Shoals Andy A. Seigler, West Columbia Please see Page 7A for details. Inside Today Bridge  ...........................'.........’......7B Calendar..........................................12B Classifieds.........................................6B Comics..............................................5B Cryptoquote.......................................7B Dear Abby..........................................5B Local Front........................................9A Obituaries..........................................7A Opinions............................................4A Sports................................................1B Stocks.............................................11A Television..........................................5B Weather.............................................7 A SATURDAY % <’0 SUK*™ blanda rh October 21, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 262 Court Clears Way For Power Pact Vote By CARL LANGLEY And PHILIP LORD Stafl Writers The state Supreme Court has cleared the way for Aiken City Council to vote on a controversial municipal power rights ordinance favoring South Carolina Electric and Gas Co. Friday, the court dismissed an injunction issued by Circuit Judge John H. Waller Jr. on Oct. 2 that blocked the council from acting on the ordinance. The injunction had been obtained by Aiken Electric Cooperative, which is involved in a dispute with the city and SCE&G over municipal power allocations. “I feel good about the ruling,” said City Manager Roland Windham. “At least the city council has the right to make a decision, whatever decision they are going to make.” Windham added that the city was trying to determine whether or not a circuit judge had the right to stop council from voting on an ordinance. “That’s what we were looking for,” he said. “I think it (the Supreme Court’s ruling) is a clarification of the council’s powers, which we had felt existed all along,” Windham said. A Supreme Court spokesman informed city attorney James M. Holly at midday Friday that the panel had voided the action taken by Judge Waller. “What the court is saying is that the injunction should not have been issued in the first place,” Holly said. He added, “It is unfortunate that the proceedings have been delayed this long, and that what I consider taxpayers’ mon ey has been wasted in having to litigate this all the way up to the state Supreme Court.” Although no exact figure was available, Holly said that several thousand dollars had been spent in legal actions. Aiken Electric, which took legal action against the city because it felt it was losing territory it was promised under a 1973 state-approved agreement, said in a prepared statement it would accept the defeat. (Please See COURT, Page 8A) FATAL ACCIDENT: Phil Clarke of the Aiken County Emergency Medical Services prepares the jaws-of-life to Staff Photo By Scott Webster free one of the victims of Friday’s fatal accident. Both victims were trapped in their wrecked cars. Collision Claims 2 On U.S.I By PHILIP LORD Staff Writer A head-on collision on UJS. I north of Aiken claimed the lives of two men Friday afternoon. The accident, which occurred around 3:15 p.m. 2 miles from Aiken, killed Billy Paul Finley, 55, Chesterfield St., Aiken, and John Wesley Dew, 36, West Columbia, said Aiken County Coroner Sue Townsend. Finley was traveling south on U.S. I in his 1981 Chevrolet Citation and Dew was traveling north in his 1985 Ford Ltd. when one of the cars crossed the center line on a curve south of the Aiken Municipal Airport, said Sgt. Julian Thigpen of the South Carolina Highway Patrol. Sgt. Thigpen declined to reveal which motorist was at fault until the investigation is completed. “I do not suspect alcohol was involved,” Mrs. Townsend said. The accident, which destroyed both (Please See COLLISION, Page 8A) East Germans Keep Up Pressure On New Leader By The Associated Press BERLIN — More than 10,000 pro-democracy supporters staged a rally in an East German city, opposition leaders said Friday, in the latest sign that activists will keep up the pressure on the country’s new leader. Members of the outlawed pro-democracy group New Forum said the rally was held in three churches in the city of Zittau Thursday night and thousands also gathered on the city’s market square. Loudspeakers were set up so the crowd outside could hear a debate on reform going on in one of the churches, said Andreas Schoenfelder, a New Forum member in Zittau. A West German official, meanwhile, rejected conditions set by East Germany’s new leader, Egon Krenz, for the possible loosening of travel for East Germans to the West. Krenz said Thursday a new law would be drafted to expand travel rights, but he made it clear that substantial economic and political hurdles stood in the way of letting everyone travel West. Many East Germans say lack of travel freedoms is one of the worst hardships of the tightly controlled society. It has been one of the main causes of the exodus of tens of thousands of East Germans this year to the West. Krenz said the government is drafting a new law that could ultimately ease travel abroad, including to the West, and allow all East Germans to possess a passport. But he said the biggest obstacle to freer travel to the West is Bonn’s Germany’s refusal to recognize East German citizenship. East German leaders say economic problems also pose considerable obstacles, because East Germans need West German currency for the visits. East Germans cannot now go to a bank and exchange East German marks for West German ones. Dorothee Wilms, who heads West Germany’s Ministry for Inter-German Relations, said Friday that Bonn will not change its position on the East German (Please See EAST GERMANS, Page 8A) Stunned President Vows 'No Red Tape' For Bay lust Ducky 8y TOM RAUM Associated Press Writer SAN FRANCISCO — President Bush inspected the ravages of the Northern California earthquake Friday, breathing a single word — “Jesus” — when he got his first look at the collapsed freeway still covering uncounted bodies. He promised all-out federal help with “no red tape.” “It’s been a very moving day,” the president said at the end of a four-hour tour of the region that gave him firsthand look at some of the areas that were hardest hit by the quake. Bush said he was “willing to do what’s needed to be done,” as he faced repeated questions from local officials about how much recovery money the government would provide — and when. But he offered no details on the size of the federal contribution to relief efforts. San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos, one of three mayors accompanying the president on his tour, told him: “We need fast action. We need checks written on the spot.” “We will do what is necessary to fulfill our responsibility,” said the president, flanked by state and federal officials. Bush said that government officials on all levels needed to cooperate, that “we’ve got to work with each other.” “In terms of what it will cost, I don’t know,” he said. But he added that Washington will work with local and state governments “to see the suffering is alleviat- ‘We need fast action. We need checks written on the spot.’ — San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos ed, the restoration begins.” Transportation Secretary Samuel Skinner, newly designated to head federal quake-recovery efforts, promised the U.S. government was prepared to play “a very very major role in helping California.” Accompanied by state officials as well as the mayors of San Francisco, Oakland and Alameda, Bush flew over some of the hardest-hit areas by helicopter and visited the collapsed double-decker expressway in Oakland in which an unknown number of rush-hour motorists are feared still entombed.. He also visited San Francisco and inspected damage in the coastal city of Santa Cruz, near the epicenter of Tuesday’s powerful earthquake. The president said “the most touching moment” of his visit was when he talked to the doctor who rescued young Julio Berumen from a crushed car. The doctor had to amputate the boy’s leg to get him free. (Please See BUSH, Page 8A) Staff Photo By David K(dwell FUN AT THE FAIR: Gary Gilbert of Aiken ignores the cold weather as he enjoys a rubber duck game at the Aiken Jaycees County Fair. The fair continues today and Sunday. For the story, please see Page 9A. ;

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