Aiken Standard, October 7, 1989 : Front Page

Publication: Aiken Standard October 7, 1989

Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - October 7, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Prep Scores Hostages Released/Page 2A SATURDAY M ft Aiken ................. Dreher................ South Aiken........... Columbia............. Midland Valley........ ....8 Orangeburg-Wilkinson ...24 Strom Thurmond...... ...27 C.A.Johnson ......... ... 0 Silver Bluff............ Bamberg-Ehrhardt..... ...21 North Augusta......... ...37 Airport................. ..18 RS-Monetta............ 14 Denmark-Olar......... ...IS Wagener-Salley........ 0 Williston-Elko.......... ..43 Wardlaw.............. ..26 King................... A Quick Read Nuns Lock Up To Protect Chickens DAVENTRY, England (AP) — Thirteen nuns locked themselves into their henhouse for three hours Friday to prevent health officials from slaughtering their flock of 5,000 chickens. The chickens at the Our Lady of the Passion Monastery, 65 miles northwest of London, were condemned to death by the Ministry of Agriculture on Wednesday after a salmonella victim blamed them for her food poisoning. An inspection found salmonella in the flock. But the nuns, led by American-born Mother Catherine, from Erlanger, Ky., said the birds were well cared for and not connected to any outbreak of salmonella poisoning. Condo Board Sues Over Heart Sign HALLANDALE, Fla. - If they allowed signs on doors at the Fairways Riviera condo and if the condo board had one on its door, the sign would read: “We Keep Our Word.” Friday, the condo board did what it voted Monday to do: It sued a condo couple for hanging from their front door a thin wooden heart with the message “God Bless This Home.” “We want them to remove the heart and not to put other decorations up on the door in violation of the rules,” said Samuel I. Leff, attorney for the Hallandale condo’s board. “When they became tenants, they agreed to abide by the rules and regulations. They don’t want to follow the rules.” Weather Cloudy Skies Partly cloudy skies are forecast today with a 30 percent chance of showers. The high will be in the mid 80s, with a low in the upper 50s. Tomorrow will be partly cloudy. Please see Page 7A for details.Deaths Please see Page 7A for details.Inside Today Bridge...............................................9B Calendar..........................................14B Classifieds.........................................7B Comics..............................................6B Cryptoquote.......................................SB Dear Abby..........................................6B Local Front........................................6A Obituaries..........................................7 A Opinions............................................4A Sports................................................1B Television..........................................6B Weather.............................................7A Kids In Shock From Hugo/Page 6A Saturday, October 7, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 248 Bush: No Chance To Take Noriega By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Bush vigorously defended his handling of the failed coup in Panama on Friday, saying there was no opportunity to seize Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega and use of U.S. force “wasn’t warranted under the existing circumstances.” “I’m not being stubborn but as I look at all the information I wouldn’t have made a different decision then,” Bush said. He added that he wouldn’t rule out any option, including military intervention, in any future coup attempt. Amid a torrent of complaints and questions over the U.S. action, the White House and Pentagon marched in step, saying the United States had responded correctly when rebels attempted — and failed — to depose Noriega, who faces drug-trafficking charges in Florida. Bush offered his defense during a closed-door meeting with Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill and then publicly after undergoing surgery at Walter Reed Army Medical Center for removal of a finger cyst. Similarly, top military leaders — Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff — testified in closed session before the Senate Intelligence and Armed Services Committees. The two panels were preparing an analysis of issues that remain in dispute surrounding the events in Panama and contacts between the rebel officers who organized the coup and U.S. officials. Armed Services Chairman Sam Nunn, I>Ga., said a lack of clear policy guidance from Bush had greatly contributed to U.S. confusion in dealing with the coup attempt and that there should have been specific arrangements for how U.S. troops were to react. “We have had a definite, longstanding policy in this country of encouraging coup” in Panama, Nunn told reporters. “We should anticipate that our policy ... might succeed. Then we have to know what we’re going to do next.” Privately, a senior administration official said that with the benefit of hindsight, the United States should have done some things differently and had “learned some things we need to improve.” Bush, however, said, “We reviewed all the information and I don’t see anything now that would have made me make a different decision then.” Many members of Congress have complained that Bush erred by not using the 12,000 U.S. military forces in Panama to assist in Tuesday’s attempted coup. And the president said he knew that some people wanted him “to unleash the full military to go in and get Noriega.” Bush said the decision not to use force was made because “It wasn’t warranted under the existing circumstances. The commander-in-chief must have the lives of American citizens foremost in mind when making such a decision.” The president said he still wants to see Noriega removed from power but “there was never a chance to have him handed over to us.” Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C-,, (See BUSH, Page 5A) i SLED Dogs Track Escapees BY CAROL WOODWARD Staff Writer COLUMBIA — It’s oft been said that dog is man’s best friend, and the old adage certainly holds true for the 18 tracking dogs used by the State Law Enforcement Division’s Bloodhound Tracking Team. Just ask SLED dog trainer Doug Hixon, formerly of North Augusta. Hixon openly boasts of his affection for the dogs he trains to track down would-be escapees of the long arm of the law. Fortunately for SLED, criminals on the run have a hard time escaping the long noses of the specially trained tracking dogs. “These dogs are like our family,” Hixon explains, as he introduces each of the animals by name. Pointing to one morose looking hound, Hixon, said, “This is Sandy. He’s 15 years old, blind in one eye and deaf, and I guess maybe you could say he’s retired now, but in his day, he tracked over 4,000 people.” (See DOGS, Page 5A) IN TRAINING: practice. Staff Photo By Scott Webster Doug Hixon (left), SLED bloodhound trainer and dog, Missy, flush out Bo Barton, agent, during Firms To Prepare Joint Proposal For Heavy-Water NPR By BUDDY WALLER Staff Writer Westinghouse Electric Corp. and Bechtel National Inc. will prepare a joint proposal to build the heavy-water new production reactor at Savannah River Site, the U.S. Department of Energy announced Friday. DOE approved the Westinghouse-Bech-tel team and a consortium of seven other companies to come up with architectural and engineering plans for the $3.4 billion NPR, which will replace the three 1950s-era reactors at SRS as manufacturer of tritium for U.S. nuclear weapons. The Westinghouse-Bechtel team and the consortium of Ebasco Services Inc., Combustion Engineering Inc., Babcock and Wilcox Co., NUS Corp., Rockwell International Corp., Batelle Memorial Institute and Sulzer Brothers Ltd. will sub proposals within IO nil choose between mit NPR design months, and DOE wil _____________ the two, an official at DOE headquarters in Washington said Friday. The official, who asked not to be identified, said the two competing groups will receive $10 million each for preparing the NPR proposals. A Westinghouse subsidiary, Westinghouse Savannah River Co., is the operating contractor at SRS, and Bechtel is the principal subcontractor there. Reaching the point of choosing between the Westinghouse-Bechtel design and the one from the consortium will be “an enormous process,” the official said. Nonetheless, the NPR will “still be able to be producing (tritium) by the turn of the century,” the offical added. In August 1988, DOE announced a “two-reactor strategy” for the NPR. The heavy-water reactor at SRS will supply IOO percent of the nation’s tritium needs. A gas-cooled reactor at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory will serve as a backup unit capable of producing 50 percent of the tritium requirements. Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons. DOE also announced Friday that a consortium of General Atomics/Combustion Engineering Inc., Stone and Webster Engineering Co. and Burns and Roe Co. will submit a proposal for the gas-cooled NPR in Idaho. The DOE official said that on Aug. 14 of this year, the department requested statements of qualifications from companies interested in producing NPR proposals. The application period closed Sept. 14. The statement of qualification gives information about the credentials of the applicant’s management, technical person nel, resources and finances. Both the Westinghouse-Bechtel team and the consortium will have to meet more than IOO requirements in their NPR proposals, the DOE official said. Last week President Bush signed an appropriations biti that allocates $303.5 million for the NPR program in fiscal. / 1990, which began Oct. I. The authorization bill that will allow the money to be spent remains in a congressional conference committee, but the DOE official said, “We don’t anticipate any problem. (NPR) is not an issue of contention.” Within the next few weeks, DOE will publish its implementation plan for the NPR environmental impact statement, a second DOE official said Friday. This official said the implementation plan, which will include public comments (See FIRMS, Page 5A) Coop Members Requesting Change In Hearing Location By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer Aiken Electric Cooperative members have sent a letter to Aiken City Council requesting a change in the location of a planned public hearing and second reading of a controversial ordinance dealing with utility franchising. A cooperative spokesman said Friday the change in the Oct. 16 meeting site is sought because large numbers of the utility’s members would be shut out of the hearing due to seating restrictions. The seating capacity of council chambers has been limited to 150 under fire safety laws, but at a meeting last Monday more than 400 people showed up, packing the chambers, outer hallways and spilling into a city parkway. The cooperative and South Carolina Electric and Gas Co. are involved in a dispute over territorial and municipal power supply rights. City Manager Roland Windham has notified both sides, in a letter sent to cooperative manager Strom Doolittle and SCE&G manager J. Sidney Ballentine, that strict limits would be put on seating and speaking at the next meeting on the ordinance. Windham’s letter said that the cooperative and SCE&G would be allowed 25 representatives each and spokesmen for both sides would be limited to 30 minutes to make presentations. The city also is asking that each utility designate its 25 representatives for admittance by police. The seating allocations would leave IOO chairs for the rest of the public, and those would be filled on a first come, first served basis. Currently, the public hearing and second reading has been put on hold because (See MEMBERS, Page 5A)Wyatt Development Co. Announces Plans For Two-Story Office Facility By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer Wyatt Development Co. announced Friday plans to build a 40,000 square foot, two-story office facility directly in front <rf the company’s headquarters on Silver Bluff Road. Robert W. (Bob) Marchal, real estate and investments officer with Wyatt, said the $3.2 million project should be completed by next March. A Wyatt official also confirmed the company has entered a bid with Westinghouse Savannah River, which is seeking 10,000 to 45,000 square feet of office space in the immediate Aiken area. Westinghouse is the prime contractor at the Savannah River Site. Marchal confirmed that Westinghouse is “a prime target” in the company’s future leasing plans. In addition to the new building, Marchal said there are 12 more individual office sites available for lease and an 13.4-acre site in the same tract has been set aside for development. tects and Engineers of Atlanta. Construction will be handled by Gillam Construction Co. ;

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Publication: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

Issue Date: October 7, 1989

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