Aiken Standard, October 1, 1989

Aiken Standard

October 01, 1989

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Issue date: Sunday, October 1, 1989

Pages available: 85

Previous edition: Saturday, September 30, 1989

Next edition: Monday, October 2, 1989

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

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All text in the Aiken Standard October 1, 1989, Page 1.

Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - October 1, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina The Top 25 Page 2A Congress Misses Deadline On Budget “— -Aiken Country ' ii* 2H¥ No. I Notre Dame..... .40 Purdue................. No. 2 Miami, Fla........ .76 Michigan State.......... .70 No. 3 Nebraska......... .35 Oregon State............ .. 7 No. 12 Tennessee....... 71 No. 4 Auburn........... .14 No. 5 Colorada ......... .45 No. 21 Washington..... 78 No. 6 Michigan......... 41 Maryland............... ,71 Duke.................... .71 No. 7 Clemson .......... .17 No. 8 Arkansas......... .39 Texas-EI Paso ........... .7 No. 9 West Virginia..... .31 No. IO Pittsburgh....... .31 No. ll Southern Cal..... .18 No. 19 Washington State. 17 No. 13 Alabama........ .70 Vanderbilt.............. 14 No. 14 Houston......... .65 Temple................. ..7 No. 15 N.C. State....... .4? Kent State............... 7? No. 16 Oklahoma....... .45 Kansas.................. 6 Oregon ................. 16 No. 17 Arizona ......... .10 No. 22 Texas A&M...... 31 Southern Mississippi..... 14 use...................... 74 No. 23 Georgia.......... 70 No. 24 Air Force......... 46 Colorado State........... 71 Weather Chance Of Rain Skies will be cloudy today, with a chance of showers and thunderstorms and a high in the upper 70s. Tonight will be cloudy with a low in the upper 60s. Please see details on Page 4A.Deaths Clyde V. Bell, Sardis, Ga. Estella M. Comer, North Augusta Ruby S. Williamson, Burnettown Please see details on Page 4A.Inside Today Bridge..............................................4D Calendar...........................................3C Classifieds........................................3D Dear Abby.........................................6C Local Front.......................................8A Obituaries.........................................4A Opinions...........................................ID Sports..........................................  1B Weather............................................4ACorrection Guard Entry Clarified The Aiken Standard incorrectly reported Saturday the method of entry by the Aiken Public Safety Department into the National Guard Armory during storm cleanup in Mount Pleasant. The lock was broken by an out-of-town guard unit. The Aiken Standard regrets the error.SURW Alan in rh Sunday, October I, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 242 Power Rights Heads Council's Docket By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer The hotly contested issue of municipal power rights reaches decision time Monday night as Aiken Qty Council holds second reading and public hearing of an ordinance that grants South Carolina Electric and Gas Co. exclusive supply rights in newly annexed areas. The Municipal Building is expected to be packed with officials of SCE&G and the Aiken Electric Cooperative — the antagonists in the dispute — and their supporters for the 7:30 p.m. session. During an earlier meeting, City Council approved on first reading an ordi-(JSC 24, Georgia 20 nance that allows Aiken Electric franchise rights in territories held before annexation, but blocks the consumer-owned utility from serving annexed areas coming into the city without a defined power supplier. In a second important piece of business, the council will give second reading and public hearing to an ordinance approving the $720,000 purchase of a 72-acre tract southeast of the city. The land, owned by the Woodward Estate, is adjacent to Citizens Field and lies along Banks Mill and Pine Log roads. The city intends to develop the tract for youth sports activities. The wrangling over municipal power rights has been going on for several weeks, with the cooperative maintaining that its territorial rights in the rapidly growing south side would be violated if SCE&G is allowed to serve newly annexed areas. At the center of the controversy are territorial assignment agreements worked out in the early 1970s by the state Public Service Commission on order from the General Assembly. During the process of setting service boundaries, Aiken Electric was assigned the then-rural areas south of the city on both sides of S.C. 19, while SCE&G accepted districts north of the city along the S.C. 19 and U.S. I corridors leading to Interstate 20. SCE&G and city officials said the agreements, while spelling out boundaries for each utility, did not interfere with the right of municipal officials to decide on a power supplier. This means the city can purchase power at wholesale and act as its own distributor or can designate single or multiple suppliers. At the center of the controversy are territorial assignment agreements worked out in the early 1970s by the state Public Service Commission on order from the General Assembly. (Please See POWER, Page 4A) Staff Photo By Scott Webstar WET AND WILD: Football fans sit in a colorful array of rain gear during Saturday’s victory by the University of South Carolina at Georgia. The Gamecocks relied on a stingy second-half defense to turn back the Bulldogs. Duke 21, Clemson 17 AP Laserphoto AIR BALL: Duke University’s Wyatt Smith (22) goes airborne over Clemson’s Gary Cooper (25) to intercept a pass from quarterback Billy Ray. The Blue Devils’ home field advantage held up as Clemson went down to its first loss of the season.Storm Brews On Slow AidHollings Charges Federal Agency Strangling Victims With Red Tape More On Hurricane Hugo.................................................Page    5A By The Associated Press CHARLESTON — Faye Thompson went to a federal aid center Saturday for a loan to rebuild her auto repair shop and patch the roof in her house tom open by Hurricane Hugo. What she got was an application and instructions to come back Oct. 12 to fill out forms. “My house won’t be standing by Oct. 12,” said Mrs. Thompson, 42, as a steady drizzle fell. “I need help right now. There s too much red tape. What good is this piece of paper going to do for my roof?” Nine days after Hurricane Hugo passed, a political storm still Vages over how quickly the federal government responded to a .crisis in South Carolina. The anger has focused on the Federal Emergency Management Agency, a $600 million agency that reports directly to Sic president. A chief critic has been Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, D-S.C., whc has accused the agency of strangling aid attempts in red tape and has called FEMA’s hierarcy a “bunch of bureaucratic jackasses.” “I would buy them a ticket to go to ‘Phantom of the Opera,’ any damn thing, just get the hell out of the way,” he said. President Bush, who flew to South Carolina Friday for a brief look at the damage, was quick to defend the federal government’s response to the disaster. (Please See STORM, Page HA)Aiken Red Cross Proud Of Public's Generosity By NINA J. NIDIFFER Staff Writer During this hectic time, it is impossible to say just how much the Red Cross has received in donations to aid towns laid low by Hurricane Hugo, but one thing is for sure: it’s a lot. And what is more, ifs still pouring in, said the executive director of the Aiken Chapter. “The people of Aiken County have been most generous in helping their friends in need,” said Jean Corbin. “It seems like every church, fire station, and person has become involved. Volunteers have given hours of labor, and people have donated food, clothes, and all sorts of things.” “We won’t know exactly how much we received in donations until later,” she said. The generosity is not going unnoticed. Already, thank you notes have been received from people in Charleston, Summerville, Sumter, and other areas which received donations sent from Aiken County. “The ones we get from the children in those areas are very (Please See AIKEN, Page IU) Benchmark Cases Await Supreme Court Decisions Would Confirm Swing To Conservatism By GLEN ELSASSER Knight-Ridder WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court will return to work Monday to face some of the most troubling issues of contemporary society: abortion, the right to die, the power of courts to correct racial discrimination and the place of religion in public schools. These cases are being closely watched as benchmarks in the court’s continuing conservative shift away from many landmark rulings of the 1960s and 1970s. Crucial to this movement have been the votes of former President Ronald Reagan’s three appointees: Justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Antonin Scalia and Anthony Kennedy. As it begins a new term, the court remains in the middle of the divisive abortion debate. In a Missouri case in July, the court for the first time significantly ‘united its 1973 ruling in Roe v. Wade, which established the right to an abortion. On the day of the Missouri ruling, the court announced it would hear cases from Minnesota, Ohio and Illinois that could result in further erosion of a woman’s right to an abortion. The Minnesota and Ohio appeals concern state laws that require a minor to notify her parents before obtaining an abortion. These laws, similar to those in most states, allow minors to bypass the notification procedure if a state judge determines that she is mature enough or that parental notification would not be in her best interest. Opponents of the Minnesota law argue that requiring both biological parents be notified, even if they are divorced or were never married, frequently amounts to a veto of the abortion right. Furthermore, opponents say, minors who cannot notify their parents must seek court approval and, in effect, go public about their pregnancies. Minnesota enforced its law for more than four years. A federal court blocked Ohio from implementing its law. Illinois officials, meanwhile, have asked the court to uphold state laws that set a range of standards for abortion clinics from the size of operating rooms to (Please See BENCHMARK, Page 4A) ;

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