Aiken Standard, September 2, 1989

Aiken Standard

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

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Years available: 1924 - 2014

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - September 2, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina a',m Prep Stores Aiken ................. North Augusta........ ..14 South Aiken........... Silver Bluff............ .... 7 Midland Valley........ ...19 Gaffney............... Strom Thurmond...... ...53 Abbeville............. ....0 RS-Monetta........... ....0 Saluda................ ... 6 Wagener-Salley....... .... ft Swansea.............. 74 Wardlaw............. ...13 Thornweil............. ....ft A Quick Read Girl Says Mother Beat, Imprisoned Her TIFTON, Ga. (AP) — A starving teen-ager rescued from a mobile home told authorities that her mother beat her, tied her up with ropes and put chicken wire over the windows to keep her imprisoned, police said Friday. Betty Faye Green, 18, weighed 42 pounds and was too weak to walk when she was admitted to Tift General Hospital on Wednesday, police said. She was listed in stable condition Friday. Their mother, Ola Mae Thomas of Tifton, was arrested Wednesday and charged with false imprisonment and aggravated battery. She was in the Tift County Jail awaiting bond Friday. Protester In Jail Until He Tells Name KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - No name, no sentence, no release, a judge has told an abortion protester who has refused to give his identity since his arrest in January for blocking an abortion clinic doorway. Criminal Court Judge Randy Nichols found Baby John Doe I guilty of trespassing in a brief non-jury trial on Thursday. But the judge, following an earlier promise, refused to pass sendee until the man gives his name. * Baby John Doe I, who remained in jail FruKoL has said he’ll remain anonymous as long as abortion is legal. Peter ^Cornell, a New Hope, Ky., attorney with the Free Speech Advocates grbup, is representing Baby John Doe I. KorneU argued for the man’s release, saying he was released on his own recognizance after a similar protest in Atlanta. Weather Mostly Cloudy Today will be mostly cloudy with a 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. The high will be near 90 and the low will be near 70. Sunday will be cloudy with a chance of thunderstorms. Please see details on Page 8A. Deaths Rev. B.T. Bouland, Ward Mattie R. Brown, Lake Success, N.Y. Clarence Drayton, Boston Anna T. Grant, Philadelphia Frances E. Green, Graniteville James P. McKenney, Aiken Please see details on Page 8A. Inside Today Bridge..............................................9B Calendar...........................................9A Classifieds........................................7B Comics.............................................6B Dear Abby........................................6B Local Front.......................................6A Obituaries.........................................8A Opinions...........................................4A Sports...............................................1B Stocks..............................................5B Television.........................................6B Weather............................................8A Trade Under Study/Page 2A SATURDAY Dobson Sentenced/Page 6A it Alanin rh September 2, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 213 Government Resumes Sole Of Tritium By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Energy Department said Friday it has resumed selling tritium to U.S. and foreign companies even though it has failed so far to find missing amounts of the radioactive gas, which can be used in making nuclear weapons. The department is satisfied that none of the missing material was diverted for illicit production of nuclear weapons, said spokesman Phil Keif, although a government report released Friday said investigators could not prove there was no diversion. Keif said that of the five grams of tritium that was missing when a team of Energy Department and Nuclear Regulatory Commission officials began searching in June, only a small fraction of one gram has been accounted for. The discrepancies were reported by several commercial customers, the department said. The department usually sells about 200 grams a year of tritium to commercial users, raising about $5 million annually. Government information about tritium supplies is classified, but independent experts estimate that about four grams is used in a single atomic warhead as a means of boosting its explosive power. Commercial sales were suspended in July because of the discrepancies. After revamping handling procedures, the department decided Aug. 16 to resume sales to all customers except those for which Giamatti's Death Shock To Baseball By The Associated Press EDGARTOWN, Mass. - Baseball commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti, who declared no one is above the game and proved it by kicking out Pete Rose, died just eight days later Friday after a heart attack at his Martha’s Vineyard retreat. The 51-year-old Giamatti, former president of Yale University, was pronounced dead at 4:32 p.m. EDT “after all-out efforts to resuscitate him failed,” said Matthew Stackpole, director of development at Martha’s Vineyard Hospital. Giamatti’s wife and son were with him when he died, Stackpole said. Giamatti was found unconscious and in full cardiac arrest when an ambulance arrived at his home at 3 p.m., the hospital statement said. CPR was administered en route to the hospital, where doctors struggled more than an hour to revive the commissioner. Giamatti, a chain-smoker who once said cigarettes were his “primary vice,” left New York on Friday morning to spend the weekend at his home on the popular New England island retreat. His death shocked baseball even as it was still recovering from his suspension AP Laserphoto HEART ATTACK FATAL: Baseball Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti at the press conference where he announced the suspension of baseball star and manager Pete Rose. of Rose, the Cincinnati Reds manager and all-time hit leader, following a six-month battle over charges he bet on his own team. (Please See GIAMATTI’S, Page 7A) shipment discrepancies remained. Keif said the first sales, starting Aug. 25, were to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. A new team of Energy Department tritium experts was formed last month to press the investigation, Keif said, but it has been unable to reconcile discrepancies in shipments from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee to two British companies, Surelite Ltd., and Saunders-Roe Developments Ltd. (Please See GOVERNMENT, Page 7A) Colombian: U.S.Troops Not Needed By The Associated Press BOGOTA, Colombia — U.S. military advisers were being sent to help with the war against drug barons, but Colombia’s defense minister said Friday it did not need “foreign troops to solve our domestic problems.” “We can face this challenge alone,” Gen. Oscar Botero told a news conference. A U.S. narcotics official said drug traffickers wanted in the United States have managed to avoid a government crackdown and remain in Colombia because of corruption among Colombian authorities. Authorities in Medellin, home of the most powerful cocaine cartel, said police defused a 40-pound bomb that was left at a bank Friday by terror squads working for drug lords. It was the latest development in a series of assassinations, bombings and arson by the drug cartels in the past two weeks. Drug lords are trying to force the government to reverse its decision to be- Ein extraditing suspects wanted by the toited States. The U.S. Justice Department seeks extraditions of 12 Colombians believed to be key figures in cartels that supply most of (Please See COLOMBIAN, Page 7A) Steel Helmet Assured Tank Gunner's Safe Return By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer The earphones of the radio set were scratching the side of F.L. Eaves’ head and he was beginning to worry about getting a headache. So, during a break in transmission, he pulled them off, reached into the floor of the tank’s gun turret and picked up a steel helmet. “I had just put it on when the shell hit the tank, and that probably was what saved my life,” said Eaves. “It tore up the helmet.” The metal fragments peppered his scalp and the side of his head. “They had to pluck ’em out,” said Eaves of the bits of metal. Gene-Gap Going Up The date was March 7, 1945, and Eaves’ 712th Tank Battalion, a unit of Gen. George S. Patton Jr.’s 3rd Army, was driving through Germany’s Rhineland in the final crushing offensive against the Nazis. “We had pulled up to the Moselle River and were waiting to go across,” said Eaves about the moments just before the German shell slammed into the tank. Eaves, the tank’s gunner, said the blast killed the tank commander, a young sergeant named Larry Greene, but he and the other crew members, including his gun loader, escaped with injuries. “Greene was in the top of the turret and he took most of the impact,” said Eaves. “It knocked me out, and when I came to I couldn’t see anything. I spent the next 45 days in a hospital.” Today, at the age of 72, the former Barnwell County farm boy and one-time clerk in the old Cassels store on what is now the Savannah River Site, is a survivor of both the war and major heart surgery. But he hasn’t slowed down. “I still set a pretty good pace,” said Eaves, who fishes, grows watermelons and spends the rest of his time puttering around a service station at Johnson Crossroad. The station sits on the perimeter of the nuclear installation. Despite his activity, Eaves says he can tell “the years are catching up with me.”* (Please See STEEL HELMET, Page 7A) Bakker Suffered Prior Problems With Nerves Staff Photo By Scott Webster NEW HEADQUARTERS: For Kay Mercer and Susan Burkhart, construction of new headquarters for Gene-Cap, a new concept in primary and adult care, represents a struggle when all seemed lost. For the story, see Page 6A. V    u By The Associated Press BUTNER, N.C. - Government psychiatrists Friday began evaluating PTL founder Jim Bakker, who was ordered to a federal prison hospital after he collapsed emotionally during his fraud and conspiracy trial. It isn’t the first time the evangelist, accused of using nearly $4 million in ministry funds to finance a lavish lifestyle, has had a breakdown. Don Harpster, Bakker’s former security chief, said the evangelist cried and couldn’t walk after he resigned from PTL in 1987. Bakker also wrote in his autobiography that he suffered a breakdown in the early years of his ministry. Tammy Faye Bakker traveled from her home in Orlando, Fla., to visit her husband at the Federal Correctional Institute, arriving at midafternoon Friday. But she did not stop to talk to reporters, who were kept off the prison grounds. She was riding with three other people in a gray Ford Taurus with Pennsylvania plates. The windows of the car were heavily tinted, but Mrs. Bakker could be seen in the front passenger seat of the car as it drove into the gates. The Bakkers’ daughter, Tammy Sue Chapman, her husband, Mark Chapman, and two unidentified people arrived in a Honda Accord with South Carolina license plates shortly before 5 p.m. A security guard detained the group until a prison official checked IDs. The car drove into the prison parking lot, Mrs. Chapman making no comment. Mrs. Bakker said in a 1988 fundraising letter that Bakker spent hours in a fetal position after he quit PTL in a sex-and-money scandal. (Please See BAKKER, Page 7A) ;

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