Aiken Standard, August 27, 1989

Aiken Standard

August 27, 1989

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Issue date: Sunday, August 27, 1989

Pages available: 78

Previous edition: Saturday, August 26, 1989

Next edition: Monday, August 28, 1989

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - August 27, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Sports AKP tlJBUi U&i^( Clemson No. 12 In Preseason Poll Page IB A Quick Read USC Freshmen Protest Visitation Restriction COLUMBIA (AP) — Some freshmen at the University of South Carolina who said they were given no choice in the restrictions on opposite- sex visitation in two dormitories are mounting a petition drive to try to get the rules changed. “The policy is too harsh,” said Kevin Beach, an honors college freshman from Walterboro who is majoring in electrical engineering and is leading a petition drive to get at op-posite-sex visitation at least in the daytime. “For guys, their own mothers and sisters can’t come up.” Fewer than 30 students of the approximately 470 students in the two dormitories voluntarily signed up to live in there. The rest were assigned there when other residence halls were filled. The visitation policy, adopted last spring, came at the urging of state Rep. Michael Fair, R-Greenville, a member of the university’s board of trustees and a fundamentalist Christian. Fair has said open visitation policies promote promiscuity. Continental Employee Struck by Plane CHICAGO (AP) — A 22-year-old mechanic for Continental Airlines was critically injured when she was run over by the wheel of a taxiing airplane Saturday at O’Hare International Airport. The employee, Hope Lewellen of Orland Park, may have lost one leg and suffered severe damage to another, said a nursing supervisor at Lutheran General Hospital in suburban Park Ridge. She was in critical condition, conscious but heavily sedated, when she was taken into surgery at about 6 p.m., said the supervisor, who declined to be identified. Ms. I Lewellen had been directing a Scandinavian Airlines Boeing 767 jumbo jet into a gate for a 5 p.m. departure to Stockholm when she was run over by a wheel after leaning down to pick up earphones that had fallen off her head, police said. The jet was moving backwards at the time. Weather Another Hot One Partly cloudy skies are forecast today with a 30 percent chance of thunderstorms. The high will be in the 90s. Tonight will be partly cloudy with the low in the 70s. Please see details on Page 12A. Deaths Julius A. Ashe, Aiken Henry G. Clanton, Barnwell Phillip Coleman, Saluda Ruth M. Cone, North Augusta T.B. Freeman, Saluda Imogene S. Gilliam, Spartanburg Anthony Holmes, North Augusta David J. Janzen, Anderson Thelma M. Lamar, Augusta Marie Smith, North Augusta Levy Young Jr., Brooklyn, N Y. Please see details on Page 4A. Inside Today Bridge          2C Business,,,,,,,..,................   ID Calendar  .....      6D Classifieds........................................3C Crossword........................................6C Cryptoquote......................................4C Dear Abby.........................................7D Local Front.......................................7A Obituaries...  ................  4A Opinions ......................................1C Sports,,,,...................  1B Weather...  ...................  12A Weddings  .........   4D Page 2A Page 7A Cold Run Testing To Begin On DWPF Sunday, August 27, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 207 Looking For A Birdie New York Couple Linked To Cartel Posadas Accused Of Money Laundering By The Associated Press ROSLYN, N.Y. — A couple was arrested early Saturday surrounded by what one officer called “enough money to bathe in” and charged with running an operation that transported nearly $350 million to the Medellin drug cartel. John Posada, 28, of Medellin, Colombia, and his wife, Deysi, 26, of Venezuela, were arrested shortly after midnight at their residence in Roslyn Heights on Ixwig Island, said Art Stiff el, a special agent with the U.S. Customs Service. Both were charged with money laundering and conspiracy. Mrs. Posada is additionally charged with making false statements for giving police a phony name, Stiffel said. The couple was held without bail at the Metropolitan Correctional Facility in New York City pending a hearing Thursday. An infant believed to be their child was taken from the home and placed in the custody of Nassau County Children’s Services, he said. He said $4 million in $10 and $20 bills and a money rolling device were confiscated during the arrest. No drugs were found in the apartment. (See NEW YORK, Page 12A) New Polish Leader Praised By KGB Head By The Associated Press Staff Photo By Qinny Southworth A DAY FOR GOLF: Kevin Ratcliffe watches his shot as he plays in the Orville White Cup at the Midland Valley Country Club Saturday. Please see story on Page 1B. WARSAW, Poland — The head of the Soviet KGB said Saturday that Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, Poland’s first non-Communist leader, is “a solid man” who will succeed in solving the nation’s problems. Also Saturday, several hundred railroad workers in the city of Lodz ended their strike at the request of Solidarity leader l^ech Walesa. The workers urged Mazowiecki to grant their pay demands. Walesa also met with I .a bor Secretary Elizabeth Dole and Senate Minority leader Robert Dole, R-Kansas, and gave them a letter for President Bush seeking more U.S. economic aid to help Poland’s struggling economy. Party Central Commitee Secretary I^eszek Miller, meanwhile, told a meeting of leaders of party committees that they should be loyal to the new Solidarity-led government, the state-run PAP news service reported. “There is no conflict between preserving ideological identity as party members and being loyal to the legal state authorities,” Miller said. Mazowiecki’s meeting with KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov was his highest-level contact with a Soviet official since the Polish leader took office last week in a historic transfer of power from the Communist Party. “I Uked him,” Kryuchkov told reporters after he emerged Saturday evening from seeing Mazowiecki at the Office of the Council of Ministers. “A solid man.” (Please See NEW, Page 12A) Education Funds Could Total $400,000 By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer The U.S. House of Representatives currently has on its calendar legislation earmarking impact aid funds for education that could amount to as much as $400,000 for Aiken County schools, but the budget still is being debated. “We probably won’t know until sometime in October how much money we will get,” said Larry Clark, comptroller for the Aiken County Board of Education. He said it could be anywhere from $30,000 to $400,000 depending upon the per-student measurements used to determine allocations. Impact aid money is appropriated each year to those school districts with student populations increased by families of workers employed at federal installations. The money is disbursed on a per-pupil basis. In Aiken County, the biggest contributor to the increased enrollments are the Savannah River Site and Fort Gordon, although there are a number of students with parents serving in the uniformed services. Clark said the Aiken County impact aid students number about 4,774 this year, but that figure could increase slightly once firm numbers are established for the student population. Clark said the tally is taken from students in kindergarten through the 12th grades. The federal impact aid money has been Aiken County Federal Impact Aid Listed below are the 20-year totals for federal impact aid in Aiken County. In those years where federal money was deposited into one category, impact aid funds are shown as unavailable. 1969-7 0..................................$610,736 1970-71 ..............................Unavailable 1971-7 2..............................Unavailable 1972-7 3..............................Unavailable 1973-7 4..................................$518,498 1974-7 5..............................Unavailable 1975-7 6..............................Unavailable 1976-7 7..................................$472,102 1977-7 8..................................$470,476 1978-7 9..................................$380,219 1979-8 0..................................$329,124 1980-81 ..............................Unavailable 1981-8 2..............................Unavailable 1982-8 3...................................$36,751 1983-8 4..........  $61,182 1984-8 5................................... $80,614 1985-8 6...................  $60,981 1986-87/ ..................................$186,300 1987-8 8..................................$131,146 1988-8 9..................................$415,000 1989-9 0..............Under    debate    in    House SOURCE: Aiken County School System going up and down like a yo-yo for years, according to Clark, and can range from a high of $265 per student each year to a low of $24, which was hit a few yeans ago. “I can remember some years, particularly back in the 1960s, when we got as much as $1 million in one year,” said Clark. But as recently as the 1982-83 school year the federal contribution dropped as low as $36,751. The most recent illustrations of the up-and-down action of the educational money pump can be seen in the allocations for 1988-89 and the money sent to the district in 1987-88. In 88-89 the district received $415,000, based on about $87 a pupil, while the year before it got slightly more than $131,000, or about $24 a pupil. Clark said the money is sent to districts for operations and maintenance and there are “no strings attached. It can be used for anything related to education, even building schools, but you can’t build schools any more on that kind of money.” The comptroller said separate audits are made of the federal allocations, but he has not been able to come up with a (Please See EDUCATION, Page 12A) Districts Get 'F' In Finance In Many States By LEE MITGANG AP Education Writer Colstrip, Mont., spends $5,148 per pupil. The district’s 6-year-old high school is flush with computers, up-to-date labs, even a greenhouse and indoor pool. This eastern Montana district, with a tax base enriched by the presence of four power plants, offers high school pupils several foreign languages and such electives as zoology, microbiology and geology. Superior, in the western end of the state, spends about $3,000 per pupil. The newest school building is 28 years old. There are no science electives beyond basic biology, chemistry and physics, in labs described as “woefully inadequate” by former superintendent William Donahue. Indoor swimming pools or greenhouses like in Colstrip? “Those would be dreams,” said Donahue. Such contrasts between rich and poor districts, endemic to virtually every state, put school finance at the top of the education reform agenda this past year. (Please See DISTRICTS, Page 12A) Voyager Finds More Rings, Tiny Moonlets By The Associated Press PASADENA, Calif. — Voyager 2 discovered at least six tiny “moonlets” hidden in one of Neptune’s two brightest rings, and also found up to three more rings orbiting the planet, NASA said Saturday. Voyager’s scientists also reported the solar system’s fourth-largest planet is surrounded by a radiation belt and has a tilted magnetic field, and may have an aurora like Earth’s northern and southern lights. The researchers said nitrogen — the gas that makes up 78 percent of Earth’s atmosphere — is the main component in the skies of Triton, the frosty Neptunian moon sculpted with faults, cliffs, pink snow, meteorite craters and inactive volcanoes that once oozed viscous ice instead of molten rock. Methane, or natural gas, is present as well, they said. Earth. Voyager traveled a curving 4.43-billion-mile path to achieve Thursday night’s close encounter with Neptune and Friday morning’s flight past Triton. By 9 a.m. PDT Sunday, Voyager will be 2.29 million miles from Neptune, speeding away from the planet at 37,689 mph. The probe will be 2.75 billion miles from “We have five rings at Neptune,” including the two bright ones found earlier by the spacecraft and three new ones, said Bradford Smith, leader of the Voyager photographic imaging team at the space agency’s Jet Propulsion laboratory. AP Laserphoto (Please See VOYAGER, Page 12A) NEPTUNE: A photo from Voyager. ;

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