Aiken Standard, August 21, 1989

Aiken Standard

August 21, 1989

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Issue date: Monday, August 21, 1989

Pages available: 18

Previous edition: Sunday, August 20, 1989

Next edition: Tuesday, August 22, 1989

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - August 21, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Sports Jets Rally, Win N.C. Exhibition Page 7 A A Quick Read Lightning Kills Man At Funeral COLUMBIA (AP) — A Clinton man who was attending his aunt’s funeral was struck and killed by lightning during the burial service in the Gates of Heaven Cemetery Sunday, authorities said. Charles Rice, 50, was about 15 feet from a tent set up to shelter the grave when he was struck during a thunderstorm, said Richland County Coroner Frank Barron. The bolt shredded and burned Rice’s clothes. Rice was the nephew of Mary E. Pickens of Columbia, said T.J. Sullivan, funeral home director. Mourners had gathered about 1:45 p.m. for the service when Rice was hit, Sullivan said, adding that no trees were nearby. “The lightning made a hole in the ground,” Sullivan said. Couple Survives 2 Months At Sea AI^AMEDA, Calif. (AP) - A husband and wife said they survived 66 days at sea on raw fish and purified water after whales rammed and sank their pleasure boat off the Central American coast. William Butler, 60, and his 52-year-old wife Simone were taken to a hospital in Golfito, Costa Rica, after being rescued by a Costa Rican Coast Guard crew Saturday afternoon, about 30 miles off that city’s Pacific coast, said U.S. Coast Guard spokesman Egbert Vallecillo. Butler told Coast Guard officials their 40-foot pleasure boat, the “Si-lioney,” was attacked and sunk by “several” whales on June 15, about 1,200 miles southwest of Costa Rica. As the boat was sinking, the couple grabbed fishing rods and a salt-water purifier and set off in a rubber lifeboat, Vallecillo said. During the course of the two months the lifeboat drifted slowly eastward. The Butlers caught between 400 and 500 pounds of fish and survived multiple shark attacks by sealing punctures with a raft repair kit, the Coast Guard said. Butler told Coast Guard officials he is an experienced sailor. The couple’s last radio contact was June 13, when they talked to their daughter, Susan Smith, in Miami. Weather Fair Skies Tonight Fair skies are expected tonight with a 20 percent chance of an evening thunderstorm and a low near 70. Partly cloudy skies will return Tuesday with a 20 percent chance of an afternoon thunderstorm. The high will be in the mid 90s. Please see details on Page 6A. Deaths James S. Baker, Jamaica, N Y. Cebell H. Bussey, Edgefield Lorine P. Gordon, Highlands, Texas Louise D. Robertson, Augusta Elias J. Smith, North Augusta Ralph N. Studdard, Augusta Margie Tudor, North Augusta Charlie M. Wray, Augusta Please see details on Page 6A Inside Today Bridge .............................................SB Calendar....,,......,,.,...........................3B Classifieds........................................3B Comics............................................. 2B Crossword........................................6B Cryptoquote......................................4B Dear Abby.........................................2B Lewis Grizzard..................................3A Local Front.......................................1B Obituaries.........................................6A Opinions...........................................4A Sports...............................................7A Television.........................................2B Weather............................................6A e 2 AfKElf COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY Page IB ATC Holds Graduation CeremonyMtrtt Standard Monday, August 21, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No* 201 Biker's Killer Left Slim Leads Coroner Holds To Hope Patience Will Pay Off By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer Shortly before daybreak on May 25, 1984 a light green sedan was speeding north on S.C. 19 between Aiken and New Ellenton. At the same time, a few miles up the road, Robert J. Tatti, 59, a Savannah River Plant construction worker, was pedaling his bicycle — also in a northerly direction and in the outer traffic lane. Death was only seconds behind the biker. Without warning, and perhaps without slowing down, the sedan slammed into the rear of Tatti’s bicycle, crumpling the little machine, hurling his body up and over the automobile and killing him instantly. Five years later, Aiken County Coroner Sue Townsend is waiting for a break in the case, hoping that someone will come forward and identify the hit-and-run driver who killed Tatti. If that happens, she believes she may have enough evidence to gain a conviction. Tiny flecks of paint from the sedan were scraped from the mangled remains of Tatti’s bike. FBI forensic experts have filed a report identifying the type vehicle that killed the biker. “We have identified the type paint and know what kind of car it was,” said Mrs. Townsend, a painstaking, patient investigator who has a reputation as a stickler for details. “If we ever find that car, we can identify it,” she said. Mrs. Townsend said while all hit-and-run cases are heartbreaking tragedies the mental anguish and pain was particularly difficult in the death of Tatti, a native of Detroit who came to Aiken to work (Please See BIKER’S, Page 10A) Poland's Premier Series Unsolved Mysteries Staff Graphic by Melissa Culp First School Day Goes Smoothly By NINA J. NIDIFFER Staff Writer A thick blanket of fog covering Aiken County early this morning caused no problems for school buses out collecting children for the first day of school. “We haven’t had any reported problems with fog,” said Dr. Joseph R. Brooks, superintendent of schools. “The First Day Photos.......................Page    10A AP Laserphoto POWER SHIFT: Newly nominated premier Tadeusz Mazowiecki (left) is congratulated by Solidarity's Lech Walesa as Poland undergoes a major power shift. For story, please see Page 2A. only hangups I know of were caused by construction on the Southside.” Reports on late buses was unavailable tlw* morning. Dr. Brooks said 24,000 students were expected to begin classes at county schools to begin the first of the 180 school days required in South Carolina. That number includes 300 new students throughout the county. These new students are the result of new families coming into Aiken, some attracted by the Westinghouse Corporation and some brought in by other businesses, he said. Also, some students are Aiken natives, the growing children of a “baby boomlet" that is increasing the number of children in the county, he said. Three building projects — one at Scho field Middle School, one at Leavelle McCampbell Middle School, and one at East Aiken Elementary School — came right down to the wire, Dr. Brooks said. Work at these sites was still underway Saturday and Sunday to get the schools ready for the hordes of children to arrive today. But although there were “some hot and heavy rumors that classes would be delayed at these schools, classes began this morning as scheduled, he said. Uncompleted jobs at McCampbell and Schofield are the detail-work of internal renovations. McCampbell still needs some doors and lockers replaced, and (Please See FIRST DAY, Page 10A) Colombia Troops Arrest 10,000 In Broad Sweep On Drug Lords By The Associated Press BOGOTA, Colombia — Military and police forces raided estates of top cocaine chieftains and detained 10,000 people nationwide as they tried to put the squeeze on Colombia’s powerful drug underworld, authorities said. There were no reports, however, of any ’ drug cartel bosses arrested in the emer-. gency crackdown, which follows the assassinations of a leading presidential candidate, a national police colonel and a magistrate. Sen. Luis Carlos Galan, the 46-year-old Liberal Party candidate, was buried Sunday after hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in a public display of grief. magistrates who walked off the job last week to protest inadequate security from hitmen hired by drug traffickers have called off the strike to join the fight, a spokesman for the jurists said. In 298 raids across the country since Galan was slain Friday night, police and soldiers detained 9,896 people, seized 330 weapons and 1,023 vehicles and confiscated four tons of cocaine paste, the Defense Ministry said in a communique Sunday night. Among the sites raided were buildings and ranches in and around the city of Medellin that are owned by Pablo Escobar, reputed to be one of the world’s biggest cocaine traffickers. Meanwhile, thousands of judges and (Please See COLOMBIA, Page 10A) Criminal Charges Not Ruled Out As Salvage Continues In Boat Tragedy By The Associated Press I/)NDON — Salvage crews searched the River Thames and a sunken vessel today for more bodies from a late-night collision between a barge and a party boat that was a fraction of its size. Police said at least 27 people were killed. Eighty-four people survived the accident early Sunday under Southwark Bridge in the heart of London but authorities remain uncertain exactly how many were aboard the privately chartered Marchioness, setting for the 26th birthday party for businessman Antonio Vasconcellos. He is among the missing. Police detained the captain and second mate of the Bowbelle sand-and-gravel dredger and said criminal charges that include unlawful killing were being considered. They examined tape-recorded radio messages to river navigators for clues into the cause of the accident. The Independent, a London daily, reported an apparent disagreement between the captains of the 90-ton Marchioness and the 1,475-ton Bowbelle over which vessel should pass first under the bridge’s central span. The paper also quoted a veteran crewman as saying the Bowbelle rammed another Thames passenger boat five years ago and nearly sank it. The Thames is one of the world’s busiest commercial rivers, used by more than 32,000 vessels each year. (Please See CRIMINAL, Page 10A) Voyager Nears End Of 12-Year Space Odyssey By The Associated Press PASADENA, Calif. — After a 12-year, 4.4 billion-mile space odyssey, Voyager 2 converges this week on mysterious Neptune, the most distant and last unexplored planet due for a visit by a spacecraft from Earth. It s almost like being on a ship of discovery like Marco Polo, Magellan and Columbus, says Jurrie van der Woude, a spokesman at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (Please See VOYAGER, Page 10A) MAJOR VOYAGER DISCOVERIES JUPITER SUN • Motions ■ faint rings • Geology of major moons, including volcanoes on one it Three new moons ; SATURN URANUS ■ Haze in atmosphere rn Tilted magnetic fie id rn Two new rings lo data: rn Large spot in atmosphere ■ Four new moons MARS EARTH VENUS MERCURY o Size of planets shown roughly to scale / A#' I Aiket^tandard's Annual Review Of College, Area High School Football Teams To Be Published Thursday ;

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