Aiken Standard, August 14, 1989

Aiken Standard

August 14, 1989

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Issue date: Monday, August 14, 1989

Pages available: 20

Previous edition: Sunday, August 13, 1989

Next edition: Tuesday, August 15, 1989

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - August 14, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Sports Aikman Shines In Exhibition Page A Quick Read Representative Killed In Crash NEW AUGUSTA, Miss. (AP) -U.S. Rep. Larkin Smith was found dead today in the wreckage of a small plane that crashed in a forest, authorities said. The plane carrying the freshman RepubGcan congressman and his pilot disappeared from radar screens about 9 p.m. Sunday and was found early today. Two bodies were taken from the wreckage, said officials of the Harrison County Sheriff’s office. Rescuers spotted the wreckage from the air about 8 a.m. and searchers struggled through heavy woods to reach the site 20 miles south of Hattiesburg, said C B. Easterling, spokesman for the Perry County Sheriff’s Department. The plane carried the congressman and his pilot, Chuck Vierung. Smith, 45, a freshman who succeeded Republican Trent Lott, now a U.S. senator, was returning home to Gulfport from Hattiesburg on Sunday when the plane disappeared from radar screens, said Charles Busby, Smith’s press secretary. Dozens of military, civilian and law enforcement rescuers searched for the plane in the Desoto National Forest. “He left Hattiesburg at 9:10 p.m. and went off radar at 9:25 p.m.,” said John Walker, a spokesman for the congressman. Walker said the weather was clear when the plane took off. Busby said Perry County authorities got a call about 10:05 p.m. from a resident who reported seeing a plane go down in the heavily wooded area. Smith, who represented Mississippi’s 5th Congressional District, is a member of the House Judiciary and Government Operations committees. He also served on special task forces concentrating on defense, crime and problems of the savings and loan industry. Smith, a graduate of William Carey College, wass a former police chief in Gulfport and was sheriff of Harrison County before being elected to Congress in November. Weather Cloudy Skies Mostly cloudy skies are forecast tonight with a 30 percent chance of thunderstorms. The low will be in the mid 60s. Tomorrow will be partly cloudy with a 40 percent chance of thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. Please see Page 6A for details. Deaths Helen R. Brodie, Augusta Rosa Lee Brooks, Twin City, Ga. Velma J. Broome, Augusta Annie G. Ferguson, Allendale Laura V. Hampton, Columbia Hubert C. Haywood, Warrenville Frank Keenan, Warrenville Thomas B Lee, Dayton, Ohio Rev. Lillie S. Matthews, North Augusta Charles T Marsh, Aiken Roy A. Miniard, Camden Wilma B. Sturkey, Wagener James A. Yon, Lexington Please see Page 6A for details.Inside Today Bridge...............................................5B Calendar............................................SB Classifieds.........................................3B Comics..............................................2B Crossword.........................................6B Cryptoquote.......................................4B Dear Abby..........................................2B Local Front........................................1B Obituaries..........................................6A Opinions............................................4A Sports................................................7 A Television..........................................2B Weather.............................................6A U I'UUut I jjj.lTr, , Violence Flares In Northern Ireland Monday, August 14, 1989 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 194 President To Sign Drought Relief Bill By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Bush is signing into law a compromise disaster relief bill providing almost $900 million to farmers who lost crops from the drought that lingers in some states and from floods that afflicted others. The legislation that Bush was signing today in the White House won final congressional passage before lawmakers took their summer recess. The $897 million measure was scaled back from the $1.3 billion farm relief bill that the House initially passed in June. Lawmakers pruned it after Agriculture Secretary Clayton Yeutter sent word that anything above $900 million was unacceptable to Bush. Bush was also dispatching two aides with a congressional delegation bound for Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, today to bring back the remains of Rep. Mickey Leland, D-Texas, and other Americans killed in the crash of their mercy flight to a refugee camp. Frederick McClure, the White House’s top lobbyist, and a deputy, Nicholas Callo, will join four members of Congress on the mission. Bush had dinner Sunday with Vice President Dan Quayle and his family at the vice president’s residence at the U S Naval Observatory, where Bush himself lived for the past eight years. The farm relief package is far less costly than the $4 billion relief bill enacted during last year’s drought. It will help farmers still facing parched fields in parts of the Great Plans and western Corn Belt, as well as farmers in parts of the South where flooding wiped out rice and cotton crops. To qualify for relief, farmers in the government subsidy program for corn, wheat, cotton, tobacco, peanuts and sugar must suffer a 40 percent crop loss. The threshold will be 45 percent for soybean and sunflower growers and 50 percent for fruit and vegetable farmers. On Wednesday Bush plans to join Barbara Bush and other family members at their oceanfront home in Kennebunkport, Maine, where Bush has spent virtually every summer since boyhood except 1944 when he was flying bomber missions in the Pacific. Bush will stay in Maine until Labor Day, Sept. 4. Payne's First Major Weather Impedes Recovery Of Bodies AP Laserphoto WHAT A FINISH: Payne Stewart celebrates a birdie putt on the final hole of the PGA Championship at Kemper Lakes on Sunday. Stewart edged Mike Reid by one shot to win. Please see story on Page 7A. By The Associated Press ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Hampered by low clouds and rain, rescuers today began the grim task of recovering the bodies of Rep. Mickey Inland and 15 others who died when their airplane in crashed into a mountain in southwestern Ethiopia. The bodies of the Texas Democrat and ll others were found Sunday in the wreckage of the twin-engine plane, which disappeared Monday during bad weather on a flight to a refugee camp near the Sudanese border. The others were presumed dead in the crash that one U.S. Air Force pilot described as “awesome, unsurvivable,” and the search for the other bodies began today in a steep ravine below a jagged cliff about JO mites out! -vest of the capital. “The nose of the plane just ran into rocks,” said Rep. Gary Ackerman, D-N.Y., who was in the Blackhawk helicopter that first spotted the wreckage of his collogue, who was the chief architect and chairman of the House Select Committee on Hunger. “The wings sheared off and the engine and fuselage were burned,” Ackerman said after returning to Washington late Sunday. Flags were lowered to half staff at the White House while and President Bush and other leaders expressed sorrow at the death of Leland, who was en route to inspect conditions of 300,000 Sudanese civil war refugees at a camp in Fugnido, about IOO miles southwest of the crash site. The Twin-Otter aircraft, owned by Ethiopia’s relief agency, crashed 4,300 feet up the side of a 5,500-foot mountain. A U.S. C-130 Hercules cargo plane and two Blackhawk helicopters carrying IOO U.S. and Ethiopian recovery teams was sent from Ethiopia’s capital this morning, but the helicopters twice were forced back by bad weather. John Guerra, a spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in the capital, said the weather cleared at midday and the helicopters refueled and set off again for the crash site. The bodies were to be flown to nearby Dembidola then ferried by the C-130 to the capital, where a team of military forensic experts was standing by. Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. Stan \......J 200 miles Leland Pl ane Found . KENYA V./ AP Reaction To Death....................Page 10A Bloyer said in Washingon that the plane did not appear to be attempting an emergency landing and “basically disintegrated” after apparently hitting the side of the mountain at cruise speed. He said the condition of the wreckage made the body count difficult. The wreckage is in terrain so rugged that medical teams, including two doctors, had to be lowered to the site from helicopters, said Haley. “At the very latest, we have 12 bodies confirmed,” Haley said Sunday. “It is fair to say the others are presumed dead.” The bodies of the nine Americans were to be flown home via Torrejon Air Base outside Madrid, Spain, where full mortuary facilities are available, officials said. Seven Ethiopians were also reported on board. Leland’s party consisted of two staff members; an aide to Rep. Ronald V. Del-lums, D-Calif.; a friend of the congressman; three officers of the U.S. Agency for International Development; and the wife of one AID official.ATC Has Plans For Expansion, New Programs By KIM MCNEELY Staff Writer Pending state approval, Aiken Technical College will be offering some new programs as well as expansion in existing majors for the upcoming fall quarter. Ronnie Booth, assistant dean of student services, said that presently the administration is making strides to increase the nursing, engineering and co-op programs. There are also plans to introduce a program in dental assisting and associate degrees in arts and sciences. Booth said that the dental assitant program is a four-year diploma program, and will probably be implemented before the fall semester. He added that ATC engineering majors are in demand at Westinghouse, but, “the ticket you need to get in is a degree.” Many older students do not further their education due to a reluctance to take the SAT exam. “We are an open USC Aiken Looking Forward To New Wave Of Students admissions school, we don’t require an SAT score,” Booth said. He said that there is a developmental division in the school that works with placing many non-traditional students in the classes they need to be in. Instructors at the school give a diagnostic test to students that haven’t taken the SAT. “We start with them where the are when they get here, and bring them up to snuff,” Booth said. The developmental programs help the non-traditional and night students brush up on their math and reading skills. He said that one-third of the students at ATC are working adults. The average age of (Please See ATC, Page 10A) By NINA J. NIDIFFER Staff Writer USC Aiken is looking forward to its best year ever as it prepares to welcome a new wave of students for the fail 1989 semester. Registration for the semester will be held Aug. 17-18 from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Student Activities Center on campus. New students must apply for admission before going through registration. They must also attend orientation Aug. • acc®rd*ng Dr. Chris P. Plyler, associate chancelor for student services. This year s theme will be “Freshman Festival They need to attend orientation in order to better acclimate themselves with if CXn-Pus’” he said- “They will find out who their advisors are on that day and make an appointment so they can schedule their classes.” New and transfer students will also na ve to take placement tests so they can be assigned to the proper English and math classes, he said. Calendars................................Page 10A Bus Routes................................Page 9B Priority drop/add — a chance for preregistered students to add or drop classes — will be held Aug. 16 from 2 to 6:30 p.m. Orientation and registration for senior citizens will be Aug. 21 beginning at I p.m. Registration will continue until 6 p.m. Classes begin Aug. 21, and Dr. Plyler said the university is expecting classes to be filled with a higher enrollment than ever before. “We are up 18 percent across the board,” he said. As of Aug. 5, USCA had received 157 more student applications than at that same time last year, and had accepted 142 of them. Reflecting these figures, Pacer Downs, student housing, is already full and has a waiting list. (Please See USCA, Page 10A) ;

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