Aiken Standard, April 9, 1989

Aiken Standard

April 09, 1989

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Issue date: Sunday, April 9, 1989

Pages available: 72

Previous edition: Thursday, April 6, 1989

Next edition: Monday, April 10, 1989

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Publication name: Aiken Standard

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - April 9, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Sports Page 2A Soviet Republic Seeks Independence Page 7A Road Work On Schedule For Fall Finish USCA Guns Down Rifles 13-2 Page IB A Quick Read Earthquake Likely In East By Year 2000 WASHINGTON (AP) — A damaging earthquake is likely to occur in the eastern United States by the year 2000 and a chances of an even more devastating quake will increase by 2035, according to one expert. Quake-prone areas include Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Arkansas, Tennessee and Mississippi, as well as South Carolina, Boston and New York, experts told a Senate subcommittee. A major quake in those areas could cause heavy loss of lives, toppled buildings, loss of communications, fires, economic upheaval, overwhelmed hospitals, flooding, destroyed bridges and the release of toxic substances. A damaging earthquake along the New Madrid Fault measuring 6.3 on the Richter scale would certainly cause damage in Paducah, Ky., and Evansville, Ind., said Dr. Robert Ketter, director of the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research. The other four cities covered in the center’s probability study were Memphis, Term., Poplar Bluff, Mo., Carbondale, 111., and Little Rock, Ark. 13 Prisoners Escape In Massachusetts DEDHAM, Mass. (AP) — About 200 police backed by helicopters and dogs searched Saturday for six inmates who fled an overcrowded jail by sawing through the bars on a window and shimmying over a razorsharp fence. Two of the inmates, clad in prison green, were captured a few hours after the break-out Friday night, and the others were caught Saturday. The inmates, including seven awaiting trial and six convicted of charges ranging from theft to armed robbery, escaped in a group from the Norfolk County House of Correction, where chronic overcrowding and racial tensions have fueled several outbreaks of violence in recent months. The population of the 173-year-old granite fortress is at any given time likely to include mass murderers and accused burglars, teen-agers and hardened older inmates, drugs users and those with communicable diseases. Weather Skies To Brighten Clouds are expected tolighten up for Sunday, but with 30 percent chance ofshowers. Tonight and Monday will be partly cloudy. The high for both days will be in the mid-50s. The low tonight will be in the mid-30s. Please see details on Page 6A. Deaths Rodolfo Calvo, North Augusta Festus Flake, Columbia Allen B. Jackson, Columbia Mrs. Mamie Nimmons, Aiken George Welsch, New Ellenton Please see details on Page 6A. inside Today Bridge..............................................5D Business...........................................1C Calendar...........................................SC Classifieds........................................3D Crossword........................................6D Cryptoquote......................................4D Dear Abby.........................................8C Local Front.......................................7 A Obituaries.........................................6A Opinions...........................................ID Sports...............................................1B Stocks..............................................2C Weather............................................6A Weddings.........................................6C A* A*blanda rh Sunday, April 9, 1989 50C Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 85 Crenshaw Splashes Into Lead By TONY BAUGHMAN Sports Editor AUGUSTA — The bottom fell out during the third round of The Masters golf tournament Saturday afternoon — twice. First, Lee Trevino, whose 3-under-par after two rounds made him co-leader with England’s Nick Faldo, watched as his hopes of a Green Coat all but drowned in a deluge of early bogeys. Then, the long-threatening skies over the Augusta National finally opened up and the resulting rains forced the delay of the third round finish until Sunday morning. Masters officials officially called play at 6:45 after Scott Hoch and Tom Kite refused to putt out on the 14th green because of the water that had accumulated on the putting surface. Play was to resume at 9 a.m. Sunday morning for the 16 players who were unable to finish the third round, Augusta National officials said. The fourth and final round was to begin at 11:30 a.m. Gates were to open for spectators at 8 a.m. Earlier Saturday, play had been suspended for an hour and 40 minutes when a bright streak of lightning ripped across the sky at approximately 3:25 p.m. Seeing two other groups leave the course, Curtis Strange walked off the ninth green to the clubhouse, exercising his option to refuse to continue play. Sr' ■i.'iiAk't-J ,‘s - (See CRENSHAW. Page 3A) AP Laserphoto LEADER: Ben Crenshaw leads after a partial third round of the Masters. Radiation Feared In Soviet Sub Sub Catches Fire, Sinks Near Coast Of Norway By The Associated Press OSIX), Norway — Norway on Saturday searched for signs of radioactivity from a nuclear-powered Soviet submarine that caught fire and sank off the coast. Authorities feared about 50 Soviet sailors died. Norway said an explosion occurred aboard the sub before it sank Friday. Moscow said there was no danger of contamination and confirmed there were deaths but did not immediately provide casualty figures or details on how the accident occurred. The vessel, one of the Soviets’ most advanced, was capable of carrying more than a dozen long-range missiles, according to U.S. officials. Vadime Rosanov, Soviet press attache in Oslo, told Norwegian television the sub was carrying only torpedoes, but he declined to say whether the vessel was equipped with any nuclear weapons. As many as half the crewmen may have died in the fire and explosion or from exposure in near-freezing seas, the Norwegian national news agency NIB reported. The ship normally carries a crew of about 95. From observations by a Nowegian reconnaissance air crew, the Norwegian Defense Ministry estimated 40 to 50 men were picked up by Soviet vessels, and it was unclear if all survived. Stables, Approval Power Affected Under Ordinance By JAMES PATRICK Staff Writer Residential stables would be allowed by right in zones currently designated as R-1E and R-1S, and approval power for conditional use requests would pass from the City Council to the Planning Commission under a draft ordinance released Friday. The proposed amendments to the zoning ordinance affect both conditional uses in general and for horses in particular, tightening the approval and application processes while providing more discretion in their approval or disapproval. The power to approve, disapprove or approve subject to a range of conditions would lie with the Planning Commission, with the right of appeal to the City Council. The Commission has formerly only recommended action, with the decision then being made by the Council. The sections of the ordinance relating to horses would provide for the redesignation of the R-1E zone to R-1S and drop the need for a conditional use request for that area. No specific setbacks for paddocks or stables would be included, although the right to impose setbacks is reserved. The (See STABLES, Page 3A) 'Miracle' Took William Kent From Lawless To Religious By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer BEECH ISLAND — Considering the way he spent the first 40 years of his life, William Charles Kent believes in miracles. “It’s a miracle I’m still alive. Yes, it’s a miracle indeed,” Kent said, his left hand gripped firmly around a plastic cup of iced tea. Kent is a Baptist minister. He has been a ‘spokesman for the Lord” since the morning 21 years ago when he heard an inner voice calling to him as he lay in bed. At the time, he was “running a few Biblical passages through my mind.” A few weeks before he had picked up a Bible during some idle time and flipped through the pages. Now he was trying to put the Scripture in an order he could understand. Carolyn, his wife, had gone to work a couple of hours before. She had known for years that he needed conversion, but wasn’t prepared for the revelation that dropped on her like a bomb when she came home from work late that day. (See MIRACLE, Page 5A) Major Factors Solved For New County Jail Just Peachy VV mm. ****** Ss By CARL LANGLEY Staff Writer Four major factors have been considered “over and over” in determining how and when Aiken County will build a new detention center, the chairman of the Aiken County Council’s Judicial and Public Safety Committee said. Now, LaWana McKenzie said, the panel appears to have resolved all four in negotiating sessions with a Hilton Head Island consulting firm, but is waiting for the prison design company to send a letter agreeing to the committee’s recommendations. The committee, according to Mrs. McKenzie, wants to make certain Correctional Concepts Inc. can map plans for supervisory control and construction of a new detention center, while developing a payment for a new jail and a sales plan for the old one. Mrs. McKenzie said it is a certainty that no plans for a new jail can proceed without the county first finding a buyer for the present facility on Hampton Avenue. The chairman said she is hopeful Correctional Concepts can meet the committee’s goals be fore an April 14 meeting of the council. If that is done, she said, the panel will be prepared to endorse the project. Estimates on the cost of a new jail run anywhere from $5 to $10 million, but a county official connected with the planning said it likely could be brought in for about $6 million. Aiken County Detention Center Administrator Lonnie McCarthy has told the judicial and public safety committee that the Hampton Avenue jail, built to house 105 inmates, is plagued by overcrowding. McCarthy said the packed conditions pose a threat to both prison personnel and inmates and could lead to lawsuits if courts feel the county isn’t making a good faith effort to solve the problems. The jail superintendent has estimated that it will take a prison at least twice as big as the current facility to meet future needs. And, he added, it “wouldn’t be a bad idea” to make it larger than 250 beds if possible. McCarthy said prison designs being looked at by Correctional i ■ ■ * Pl HH| :C”*VT Yt’FT* ■ c '* I '*»* 'ITW ww m a* .f* •    r"‘    <\\    \k*    SP:' ' 1 ,i .V VA (See MAJOR, Page 5A) Staff Photo By Ginny Southworth PEACH QUEENS: Pageant winners ride in the 1989 Johnston Peach Blossom Festival Parade. Festival goers remained spirited despite the afternoon rain. Please see details on Page 7A. v    I    v ;

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