Aiken Standard, March 3, 1989

Aiken Standard

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Location: Aiken, South Carolina

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - March 3, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Coming Sunday Blasts from the past are making a comeback. Hits from the 50’s and 60's are filling the airwaves. Writer Priscilla Boatwright explores the trend in this week’s Aiken Standard Sunday Magazine. ^ Carl Langley's series on the impact of the Savannah River Plant on the Aiken area continues Sunday. This story concerns the changes in the economy since the plant came to town. ^ Palmetto Landscaping designers learned some tricks of the trade at a Walt Oisney World seminar. Reporter Philip Lord has the story on what they learned in the Sunday business section. A Quick Read Creepiest, Crawliest Found At Bug Zoo WASHINGTON (AP) - The National Zoo celebrated its 100th birthday this week with Barbara Bush leading the noisy hoopla, but over at the Smithsonian’s Insect Zoo, things were so quiet you could actually hear the giant Madagascar hissing cockroach hiss. The silence was broken by shrieks and gasps from a class of first-graders who gathered round to watch Cleo, the orange-kneed Mexican tarantula, gobble her weekly meal of a live cricket. If you blinked, you’d miss the show. Might these spiders be desperately hungry on such a spartan diet? ‘Tarantulas don’t bum a lot of calories,” said Sally Love, the Insect Zoo’s director. “They just sit around, waiting for something to bump into them. They can go for a year and a half without eating anything at all.” Miss Love is plainly in love with bugs. A George Washington University graduate with a degree in biology, she postponed plans to get a master’s degree and quit her job as a “grunt” on Capitol Hill seven years ago to run the tiny Insect Zoo at the dead-end of a third-floor hallway in the National Museum of Natural History. “Everybody has a horror and a fascination with insects,” she said. ‘But when people try to take a close look at insects, they say ‘hmmm, they’re not so bad after all.’ In fact, they are really very interesting.” Miss Love receives $20 a week to spend on fresh fruits and vegetables for her bugs. Weather More Clouds Mostly cloudy skies are forecast tonight with a chance of drizzle and a low in the mid 40s. Partly cloudy skies are forecast Saturday with warmer weather. The high will be near 70. Please see details on Page 6B.Deaths Deaver Lee Adkins, Augusta Alma W. Barrs, Augusta Annie W. Bean, Edgefield Margaret C. Boland, Columbia Carl V. Glover, Augusta Lillian Green, Columbia Cullum Y. McGahee, Wrens, Ga. Fred Perry, Jackson Fred W. Stanley, Ridgeland Please see details on Page 6B.Inside Today Bridge  ......  5C Calendar.......................................... 8B Classifieds........................................2C Comics.............................................2B Crossword........................................6C Cryptoquote......................................4C Dear Abby.........................................2B Local Front.......................................1B Obituaries.........................................6B Opinions...........................................6A Sports...............................................8A Television.........................................2B Weather............................................6B Page 2A Page IB Gunnells Makes Switch To Republicans SUkcn ST anda rh Friday, March 3, 1989 250 Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 54 Tanker Aground Near Honolulu By The Associated Press HONOLULU — A tanker carrying 90,000 barrels of crude oil ran aground in stormy seas about 15 miles from Hawaii’s most popular beach, spilling an estimated 117,000 gallons of fuel oil and crude, officials said. Coast Guard spokesman Keith Spangler said the 800-foot tanker Exxon Houston sent a distress call at 8:20 p.m. Thursday off the Hawaiian island of Oahu. The captain of the tanker reported the ship was “hard aground” three-tenths of a mile northwest of Barbers Point on Oahu’s southwest coast, about 15 mils west of the island’s densely populated area containing Honolulu and Waikiki Beach, its most popular tourist area, Spangler said. ‘They’ve told us their fuel tanks were completedly emptied,” Spangler said. He said an estimated 92,000 gallons of fuel oil had leaked through holes in the tanker’s hull and 25,000 gallons of crude oil had spilled. Spangler said it wasn't clear wheher the crude leaked when the tanker broke loose from its moorings in 12-to-14-foot seas, or whether it spilled through holes in the hull. Officials don’t know if crude is continuing to leak, he added. The cause of the grounding was under investigation, he said. “All I can tell you is we had high winds and high seas at that particular place,” Spangler said. Spangler said the Oahu Civil Defense Agency reported early today that fuel oil was washing ashore on the beach at Barbers Point. However, he said the lengh of shoreline affected probably wouldn’t be known until daybreak. Courtney Harrington, a spokesman for the agency, said officials would decide (See TANKER, Page HA) Still Fighting AP Laserphoto CONFERRING: President Bush and Defense Secretary-designate John Tower confer before a Cabinet meeting earlier this week. Debate is continuing on the nomination in the Senate. Please see details on Page 2A. Spy Ring Cracked, KGB Dealt A Blow By The Associated Press BONN, West Germany — The government said today it dealt a “major blow” to the KGB by cracking a spy ring that news reports said gave the Soviets direct access to key military and research computers in the West. A West German television network on Thursday said the spy ring acquired passwords, codes and other information from computers in the United States, West ern Europe and Japan. West German prosecutors said three people were arrested and five others were under investigation. A second TV network in West Germany reported that at least IO computer hackers were involved in the spy ring. The Norddeutsche Rundfunk broadcasting network said the ring gained access to the U.S. Defense Department’s general databank, known as Optimus; a NASA and a “Star Wars” research computer; and computers tied to nuclear weapons and energy research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and the Fermi National Accelerator laboratory in Illinois. The Savannah River Plant is not one of the installations involved in the ring. The network said attempts were made to gain access to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory at the University of California, which it called a key link in efforts to break into other U.S. computers. Gifford Stoll, an astrophysicist who did research at the laboratory, said up to 50 military computers were broken into through an astronomy computer but that the hacker did not have passwords for classified information. (Please See SPY, Page 11A) STOLL Positive Reports Give County, State S&Ls A Boost By PHILIP LORD Staff Writer Savings and loan institutions in Aiken County and in South Carolina have received a reputation boost due to recent positive reports. The reports, one published in USA Today and Rte other a study by two Clemson University professors, said that the state’s S&Ls are successful businesses. In its Feb. 13 edition, USA Today rated S&LS throughout the nation and found that out of 3,046 S&Ls surveyed that Aiken’s Security Federal, rated 888th, and Palmetto Federal, 1245th, were sound financial institutions. On the paper’s scale, the healthiest S&L was number one. South Carolina also fared well on the state level, with only two institutions, Security Federal in Columbia, 2731, and First Federal in Rock Hill, 2734, failing the paper’s solvency test. Security Federal Savings and Loan in Columbia, however, is not part of the same company as Security Federal Savings Bank in Aiken. (See POSITIVE, Page 11A) Past Habits Starting To Show As U.S. Cancer Deaths Rise FDIC Takes Over 37 More S&Ls In Six States By The Associated Press WASHINGTON - The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. is supervising 73 savings institutions after taking control of an additional 37 S&Ls in six states. Although the FDIC regulates commercial banks, it began on Feb. 7 to take over the 220 shakiest S&Ls in preparation for the regulatory reorganization proposed by President Bush. Of the 37 pat under the FDIC on Thursday, 12 were in Texas, IO in Kansas, eight in Arkansas, four in Louisiana, two in Alaska and one in Maryland. They have assets totaling $7.9 billion. The goal of the takeovers is to clamp down on above-market Interest rates offered by the failed institutions, root out any undiscovered fraud and prevent the (See FDIC, Page HA) New Baptist Seminary Voted In By The Associated Press ATLANTA — U.S. mortality rates for two of the three leading causes of death —■ heart disease and stroke — are headed downward, but cancer is on the increase as unhealthy habits of yesteryear catch up with the older population. The Centers for Disease Control said Thursday that the U.S. death rate from heart disease in 1987 was 313 per 100,000 people, down from 318 the year before. For stroke, or cerebrovascular disease, the rate was 61 per 100,000, down from 62. But the mortality rate from cancer, the nation’s No. 2 killer, has been going up in recent years, the CDC said. There were 196 cancer deaths in 1987 for every 100,000 Americans, up from 195 the year before. “What we are seeing... is the continuation of some long-term trends,” said Dr. Harry Rosenberg, a researcher with the National Center for Health Statistics. Heart disease, cancer and stroke account for about two-thirds of the 2 million deaths that occur in the United States every year, the Atlanta-based CDC said in its weekly report. Health professionals closely analyze the CDC’s statistics on the three leading causes of death for use in determining public health programs. “They’re used to monitor the health of the nation,” Rosenberg said. He said the cancer rate has been rising as Americans who had unhealthy lifestyles in their youth get older. But the rate should fall in coming years because of changing lifestyles among the young. For example, among 45- to 54-year-olds the cancer rate dropped to 166 per 100,000 in 1986 from 181 per 100,000 in 1979, Rosenberg said. He attributed preventative measures of the past two decades such as improved diet and less smoking as contributing to the drop. Hie decline in deaths from heart disease and stroke has been a decadelong trend, said Thomas Thorn, an epidemiologist with the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Most experts believe that the decline can be attributed to improvements in personal health, greater prevention of disease, improvement in medical care for heart or stroke patients, or all of those factors, Thom said. (See PAST, Page HA) By The Associated Press GREENVILLE, N.C. - In a defiant move against the theological conservatives who run the Southern Baptist Convention, a coalition of moderate Baptists has voted to create its own independent seminary. Members of the moderate Southern Baptist Alliance voted 462-42 on Thursday to create a seminary in Richmond, Va., that would reach out to all nine Baptist denominations as well as people of different ethnic backgrounds. The new seminary would be located on or near the campus of the predominantly black Virginia Union University, which has a Baptist School of Theology. Leaders of the Southern Baptist Alliance said they hope to open the new seminary as soon as they can raise the necessary $500,000 and finalize plans. “It’s a very risky, bold step and a lot of things have to be worked out before it’s truly a reality,” said the Rev. M. Mahan Siler of Pullen Memorial Baptist Church in Raleigh, N.C. Pullen is one of 23 North Carolina churches that belong to the (See NEW, Page HA) Eastern Offer May Avoid Strike By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Federal mediators say a new Eastern Airlines offer to its machinists union brings hope of avoiding a national strike that union leaders describe as “IOO percent” likely unless President Bush stops it by midnight. Eastern pilots, rejecting an unusual videotaped offer by airline owner Frank Lorenzo in separate contract negotiations, said Thursday they would refuse to work behind machinist picket lines. Other unions also pledged support in a plan to block work at other airlines, railways and sea transport companies if a strike is called. A federal judge in Minnesota ordered against any sympathy strike at Northwest Airlines, but the union was seeking orders in another federal court here to allow such action. Talks between financially troubled Eastern and its 8,500-member International Association of Machinists affiliate were expected to continue today “right up to the deadline” if no settlement is reached in the 17-month-old dispute, said David Bushnell, spokesman for the National Mediation Board. (See EASTERN, Page UA) ;

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