Aiken Standard, January 22, 1989

Aiken Standard

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Location: Aiken, South Carolina

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Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - January 22, 1989, Aiken, South Carolina Aiken County Public Library A Quick Read Staff Photo By Phil Jones A WINNER: This is a display winner in the Aiken Camellia Show. This entry was grown by Mrs. K.L. (Carolyn) Hankinson. Falling Space Debris Lights Up Night Skies By The Associated Press A spectacular light show that some mistook for a crashing airplane or a comet when it lit up the night sky over several states was just the body of a derelict Soviet rocket burning up in the atmosphere, officials said Saturday. The Federal Aviation Administration, National Weather Service and military bureaus and bases across the Midwest and Southwest were swamped with calls about Friday night’s display, officials said. Sightings of the object around 9:10 p.m. EST were reported from Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana, Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Mississippi and Iowa, officials said. Sports Rifles Shoot Down Pacers Page IB • College Basketball ... Pages 4B,5B • High School Report.. Pages 6B,7B • Scoreboard....................Page    2B Weather Mostly cloudy today with a 20 percent chance of rain and a high in the low 50s. Low tonight will be in the upper 30s. Monday will be partly sunny with a high of 60. Please see Page 5A for details. Deaths Toby G. Galloway, Warrenville Mrs. Genevieve C. Mason, Aiken Donnie Moore, Wagener Willie E. Robinson, Camden Mrs. Dorothea G. Sanford, Aiken Rufus W. Sturkie, Aiken Please see Page 9A for details. Inside Today Bridge   ...........    5D Business...,....,,'........ .*....................1C Calendar............................................6C Classifieds.........................................3D Crossword.........................................6D Cryptoquote.......................................4D Dear Abby..........................................6C Local Front........................................7A Obituaries..........................................SA Opinions  ......................^..............ID Sports.......................................••........1B Stocks...............   2C Weddings..........................................6C Weather.............................................5A Page 2A Resentment, Anger Linger In Miami City Hesitant On Kalmia Suggestion Sunday, January 22, 1989 soc Aiken, South Carolina Vol. 122 No. 19 Rain Forecast For Miami Inside • Game day is at hand......................1B • Strom Thurmond star in big game ... 3B • 49ers must stop ‘shuffle’................3B • Bengal running game is key............3B • Two prognosticators speak............3B From Wire Reports MIAMI — The hoopla and the hype will reach a fever pitch today, but at 5:15 p.m. Super Bowl XXIII will belong to the players and the coaches of the Cincinnati Bengals and the San Francisco 49ers. The annual battle for the NFL Championship could be marred by rain, according to forecasters. The National Weather Service forecasts a 70 percent chance of rain and thunderstorms throughout the day and into the evening. The temperature at kickoff is expected to be in the low 70s, dropping into the upper 60s during the game. • The Super Bowl game will be televised by NBC. The pre-game show begins at 3 p.m. Local NBC affiliates are WAGT-TV Channel 26 (Cable 11) and WIS-TV Chan-nel IO (Cable 10)._ The weather service advised fans to carry raincoats and light sweaters. Umbrellas are not permitted in the stadium. “On the whole, ifs not bad football weather,” said forecaster Cliff Brock. “It’s maybe even better than the heat wave we’ve been having.” Maybe, but rain would be the last thing the NFL would want to disrupt its showcase. Rain might negate the speed of the 49ers’ game-breaking wide receiver Jerry Rice and hurt the San Francisco running game more, too. Cincinnati, with fullback Ickey Woods, is more of a straight-ahead running team. Bengals coach Sam Wyche said wind would be a bigger problem than rain because of its affect on the passing games. The forecast calls for southeasterly winds at 15-20 mph, gusting to 25 mph. The NFL says it has never rained during the Super Bowl itself. Rain stopped shortly before the 1975 game between Pittsburgh and Minnesota in New Orleans. Leading Citizen Stresses Home Life Bush Hosts Tourists On 1st Day Late Parties Don't Interfere With Duty By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Bush got an early start today on wrapping up the $25 million extravaganza marking his inauguration as the nation’s 41st president, opening the White House grounds to the public and leading about 15 people on a tour of his new home. “Thir is the people’s house and it does seem appropriate on this first day that we welcome as many as we can,” Bush said after spending his first night at the White House. The doors opened at 8 a.m. to about 400 people who had waited through the night outside in temperatures that dropped to the 20s. It was the first “open house” at the White House in 80 years, and organizers had expressed concern that the crowd touring the building would be more restrained than when Andrew Jackson invited celebrators into the White House at his first inauguration in 1829 and they all but trashed the place. Those allowed inside went through the usual security checks, and once they got in the presidential mansion, they were jovial but still shivering from the cold they had endured. First Lady Barbara Bush joked about how early the tourists had to come to be the ones selected for the personalized tour, saying, “They saw us come in last night.” The Bushes had spent Friday night stopping in at each of the galas held to celebrate the inauguration, and had not gotten back to the White House until 12:45 a.m. Asked about her first night in the new home, Mrs. Bush said it was comfortable, but “too short.” As Bush began his first full day as president, former President Reagan was Optimism High For UM&M Sole Clearwater Workers May Return To Jobs By PHILIP LORD Staff Writer Following months of negotiations, the sale of the United Merchants and Manufacturers’ Clearwater Finishing Plant could be announced early this week, according to Robert D. (Bob) Mathews, executive vice president. “We feel like we are getting extremely close,” he said. Harold Simmons, general manager of the plant, said, “The interested party in the UM&M plant is in the final stages of negotiations for the plant." He added, “It is my understanding that the negotiations are about completed.” Though he would not release the name of the company attempting to purchase the plant, Mathews said that lawyers for both companies have been meeting and should reach a decision as early as today. The plant is expected to reopen this year under a new owner as a printing and finishing operation, Mathews said. Employees of the UM&M plant could be hired by the new owner because of the need for their expertise with the technical processes, he added. The plant will not be as large as the UM&M operation, but as many employees as feasible will be hired by the new owner, Simmons said. “As far as we are concerned, all of the issues (blocking the sale of the plant) are resolved,” Mathews said. UM&M announced the closing of the plant March 2. The decision to close the plant, which cost at least 458 people their jobs, came as a result of continued financial losses, officials said. Company officals announced in July they had sold the Valchem Divison to Air Products Chemicals Inc. TOP CITIZEN: Sally Bigger is North Augusta’s Citizen of the Year, but she considers raising her three sons to be her biggest achievement. Please see story on Page 7A. Bundy Breaks Silence, Admits Other Slayings By The Associated Press ORLANDO, Fla. - Convicted murderer Ted Bundy confessed to at least nine additional killings Saturday while his lawyers maneuvered to block his execution scheduled for Tuesday, officials from two Western states said. Bundy confessed to killing at least eight young women in western Washington state in 1974, investigator Robert Keppel of the Washington attorney general’s office said. Bundy also confessed to the 1975 murder of a 26-year-old Vail, Colo., ski shop employee whose body was never found, Vail Police Chief Ken Hughey said. Bundy, scheduled to die in the electric chair for the kidnap-mur-der of 12-year-old Kimberly Leach in 1978, has been linked to as many as 36 killings and disappearances of young women in Washington, Colorado, Utah and other Western states. The 42-year-old law school dropout was visited Saturday by officials from several Western states, and more interviews were scheduled for Sunday, said Paul Decker, assistant warden at Florida State Prison in Starke. Bundy’s lawyers lost two more bids for a stay of execution Saturday. U.S. District Judge G. Kendall Sharp, who in 1987 called Bundy “a diabolical genius” and “probably the most competent serial killer in the country at this time,” denied a request for a stay Saturday morning. A three-judge panel of the lith U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta denied Bundy’s appeal in a telephone conference Saturday afternoon without addressing any of the legal issues, said court clerk Matt Davidson. As a last resort, attorneys can appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, but the nation’s high court already (Please See BUNDY, Page 10A) DANCING THE NIGHT AWAY: President Bush and his wife, Barbara, dance at an inaugural ball in the Pension Building in Washington. back in his home state of California, where he and wife Nancy were settling into their new home in Bel Air, near Los Angeles. Speaking with reporters en route to California, Reagan called the transfer of power a “bittersweet experience.” “It was hard to say goodbye,” he said, but he added that he was returning “to a life we did love very much.” (Please See BUSH, Page 10A) ;

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