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Aiken Standard: Friday, February 1, 1924 - Page 1

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   Aiken Standard (Newspaper) - February 1, 1924, Aiken, South Carolina                                 AIKEN, SOU HI CAROLINA. FRIDA*. FEBRUARY 1.1914  MMI  THE NEW DOCTOR'S FIRST CAUL  It mtkea (lie patient ut up and hope h« u to got wall  Vol. *. %  nill—ta  lo A vavn. I  TUITION MADE  Yew,  wmmmnmm  X, I' '.if'  Kila  tlllS MONTH HAS  I*BC ll LI A KIT!BS  Reduction ofTaxation  AIKEN COTTAGERS  AIKENS  Jetton* Made after a Work at Floreae* Ex ■Station.  [ It I* peculiar, come to think of ,:f, that February, the shortest •month cf the twelve, should have live Fridays, and it da»en*t happen often. la fact it ha* happatmd \ only four times in the last hun deed mad fifty yearn —*« 178&  1«28. 185*1 and I HHC But it art happens that tho Fnomary which heros today wit!    Eri-  Cullege.— Bol! Weevil In- rn a m 1««/* is the title ell CteMdar 31, just issued by the South :  '    Experiment ballon in co- J    ™ EL _  operatic with fXe ti. S. Department,    days, as any me may    observe from  of Agriculture. reporting’ on the,    the calendar,    However, it    won’t  ytqiyfo-maA at-file Bell Weevil Cop-    happen again    until    1952.  4x^1 Ration wh : eh was established  u fte!W« «*«Hy in M«3. making ‘    A    A    DDI    CH Ii  practical tar maine ndationa to fumers fWADLt UAKKIcUH basad upon the result* of inviaUga-    Aflftir    C' TI ITC H A V  flan* conducted during the year. I    UUWtO    lUtwUMT  The publication sets forth the gene-  organization of the work gives data on field experiment •Whit potions in varioue parts of the ""*55,"'cm work with mr* poisons, on duenna machinery, on wary ti hibcr- :  nation, on growth and fruiting studies nm totter, etc. It is free to all CTtt-r.ena and wit) be sent upon request mad* ta damson Collage.  Ti Prof. H W. Barre. Director of Agricultural Bases reb. under whose depart (ha work has been conducted, im that, though it may be inadvisa to base conclusions \ one year’s lits in such studies, Insurgent defer information on weevil con trol and the apparent significance of of the data at hand have led the I authorities tom ake this preliminary report and to give recommendations for the guidance of farmers in 1924. These’recommendations are given below. .    *  Recantmendatlcn# for 1924 I I, Varieties.—We recommend Cleveland tor wilt-free land* and Dime   Bipqih wiser# the soil is infested  || 'ilk wilt. Where one desires to plant Hag staple cotton, we recommend  a rn  ■Athar and Express. LjL laBitfclg Seed.  We recotn-thftt planting seed to be delinted by the deliming machines used I Oil mills or by the sulphuric  •y« recommend the SOO to 800 pounds of a | Wall balanced fertiliser. J I Plahi section of fertiU-fi re 19 pee coni of • I ts $ par cont of  j When DwHpttfi JtttL? op?r.i “L’Eitaer d'Amjre" Jai ic vci a. thy l|ettefielit*n during the last sea-* soh Caruso was alive Mim Mabte Garrison, who i» to bt heard boro BMI Tuesday evening in the second of the •ho Arte numbers was Adm* while Hie famous tenor was Nemorino. It was Miss Gat iaon’» first ippearance in tha role and she char ad equally the success of the flea Canal, • Mas Smith, the veteran critic of the New York American, wrote ” of nee that: “Mable Garrison, prima donna American coloratura, impersonate I the vivacious aud coquetish Adina for the first tipi# here, acting the part most bewitchingly and singing her florid cartelina with gracile charm." The New York Herald said: ‘There was charm in her perforator nee las: night. None of the recent Admas had the graciousness of manner she display* is good to get the illusion of youth over the fv»otI»ghts ai d Minot Garrison did that.”  Unusual interest is being felt in Miss Garrison’s forthcoming concert hare. It will be an event second in importnace on the Pro Arte program only to Josef Hofmann’s recital which opened the series.  The program for Miss Garison’s concert next Tuesday night follows:  I—(ai Shepherd Thy Demeanor Vary, Brown; (b) Phillis Has such Charming Graces, Anthony Young; <c) Come unto These Yellow Sands, Frank La Forge  II—(a) “Un Voce Poca Fa” from Barbar of Bovill#, Roasmi.  m-Hmi Atm im  I v inter cottagers who are here or have   1  Already opened their homes in Aiken [ j ‘or lh?    season and those who    are    ex-*  I peeled ih    the near* future atm:'    Th#    Abort Total  .• Oliver ii.nl a. New Y,rt. »f« punty. Schoai Dtotritl MS  I ‘Ucrmlariis,-    |    _ * r. „  H • fflieBsM Ph#tp«, Aiken. -Bow  :     Snub of tie Slkte .if Scum  J«kl.    I na,    the varlet!!    tour ties,    municipal!- ‘*  Mrs,    J >tef Hofmann,    Aiken,     { i Wt     townships    and    school    distmta  Fcmnrtfc®  Tredarhk % Snow, Nevi. YzTk. s *2,?    approximately    IT    paresai......  "Deodar* J*    -of the total assented valuation of IBI  J Hopkins Smith, Falmouth Fore* taxable property in ii * stele aldel Mas!., "Cedar Lodge."    **« ta figure* Jtat made public by Urn  «. ^ State Tax Commission.    ;    rf  The figures for Aiken county ami municipal ar® given as follows: .  Bayard Warren, New York.  t&ria.”  «.Mrs. E. N. Potter, Jr., ML Kisco,    ______  NL Y... Lorenz cottage.    I    County    bonds       1199,000  N. C. Reyn a1, New York, Stone Cot- I School district bonds ........ 158,800  I ta gar ■     •*    j    Municipal    bond!      Jt99,0UO   :     H    K.    Tainter,    Connrctktm,    “Bog-   ---------_    Sinking    funds    .    iS^lw  wood    --——— ■ — ■ - —- ■ -  Meeting of the Carolina Govenors Doesn’t Run True to Old-Time Form  Mrs C. B. Sautter, Cedar Raids, * -Tlharhiston, with oveFfH.OfrT.oOfr Tn U.W44, ‘ Onawa    ”    bond* top# th* list af tim  Mrs. Frank Hillsmrth, Dayton, O.,    IwASw  Wiehl cottage.    |Three counties—Bamberg^ (lalhoun^  Fitch-Gllberta, CilbertvilU, N. Y., «H» Fairfield—have issued no cawny “Red Top"    bonds while no municipal honda have  J. D. Lyon, PitUburg, Pa.. "Sand- j     B *     rk ^ l «y   huTgt  *♦    Jasper county. Greenville county  Mr*. A. Von Loesecke, New Yorkville list in the amount of scohool die-  or  Times change. The old order passes. The nee/ mea supplants the oldg  Of the proverbial amenities incident to a meeting of the Governors of the Carolinas only the tradition now remains.  Tuesday, in Columbia, when Governor* Cameron Morrison of ^N° rl h Carolina came to address the South Cageling Genera 1  A rn    I    ..  hr Tar Her! executive    v    ^  his speech, a luncheon was ar. ango at the Jefferson Hotel. Governor McLeod occupied a sedc ... w..a vcl v. .aa table and Governor Morrison was seat-L*d at the other end. Present were probably sixteen other gentlemen.  And coffee was the strongest beverage indulged.  Not even the merest men ton was made of "What the Governor of North Carolina said to the Governor of South Carolina” on that memorable occasion dating back to the dark  just following the War Between the Sections and which has been recalled many, many times during ihe past half century.  For both Governor McLeod and Governor Morrison are total abstnin-ters.  Frank Page, head of the North Caro Im* Htghwny Department and a br~th-  .V Ute VValtQ’- Hines Page, n« \in**ncan Ambassador to th ' C ,tr. ;7 St James, was "among lh • Mr. Page accompanying   1  i.  u> udt mtryn  of tn\  cant of  6 per cent of nitrogen, and I per cent of potash should lie In additiep to the above, 50 to pounds of nitrate of soda or the of sulphate of ammonia be applied immedately after topping. On the heavier types of ii, or where part of the nitrogen applied as a side application, the lie forms of nitrogen, such as rate of soda and sulhate of amire just as good as the more ^pensive organic forms and may be usid to supply all of the nitrogen netd-r I. On Jfght soils where it is des.red kl Oui all or a large part of the before planting, one-third , nitrogen should be supplied from >rganic materials such as cot-  1  tons#* d u.oal, fish scrap, blood, or tankage.  4. Time of Planting.—We reef lament the planting of all cotton in a -community at approximately the date, which should be after the soil is warm anough to give rapid germination and rapid early growth. In 1923, April 20 planting did bis. at Florence, and April 25 toMay I planting did best at Clemson College.  5. Spacing.—We recommend one to three stalks per nill 8 to 12 inches apart lr. "A to 8 1-2-uot rows on thin Roil, and 3 1-2 to 4 I ot rows on the more fertile soils.  6. Poisoning.—Wrier - hibernated weevils are aoundant (20 or mjre weevils per*a-re) we reccmmend one ap^lDati n of poison at t. • time the vc**y first square® to be four. I iii the  I are as large as a err.-.-.ira. If  .  y  i -    \|    rrison    to Columbia and  also speaking before the South Carolina solons.  Aiken county wa# represented at this meeting of the Carolina Gover* ernors, which, as has been stated, did not run true to old-time form, by Senator John F. Williams, who was on the legislative committee to receive Governor Morrison, Lieutenant-Governor E. B. Jackson of Wagoner,  "Boxwood.”  Thomas Hitchcock. New York, "Cherokee.” .  William Pitkin, Hartford, Ct., “Idylwood."    *  George H. Souther, Hudson, N. Y., ‘Courtland.”  Samuel G. Tucker, New York, "Pine haven A’  Seymour H. Knox, Buffalo, N. Y., ‘Rye Patch.”  Winthrop Rutherford, Allamuchy, N. J., "The Pillars.”  Clarence Dolan, Philadelphia, “Calico Cottage.”  Cocllett Gallatin, Wyoming, “The Nook.”  Dr, George L. Todd, Montreal, Can., Beach cottage.  Mrs. Henry Dunnell, Providence* R.  11., "Bandbox.”  Horace Lowery, Minneapolis, "Roof Tree.”  Miss Taylor, New York, Fermata bungalow.  Charles J. Tice, Bradley Beach, N. j J- Ray Woodward  trict bonds.  PYTHJAN BANQUET AN  ENJOYABLE AFFAIR  Following their usual custom, tha-— Pythian Knights of Aiken met around the bouquet board Monday evening at the Hotel Aiken with the ladies and a delightful evening wa# spent. Chancelor Commander Edward S. Croft presided aa toast master, the first speaker on the program being C. Lee Cowan, who responded to the tua&t, "The Ladies Fair.” P. F. Henderson indulg- « cd some ‘‘Rambling Recollect ion***. Aud lay H. Ward, who recently carte / to Aiken a* district agent of Hie ca*-* operative extension forces, spoke on "Friendship,* and delivered a splendid Pythian talk. The last speaker wa# Ernest L. Allen, grand prelate of the Knights of Pythias in South Carolina, his subject being "South CaroUMa’e cai! to Pythian lam.” It  from Hamlet, Thomas.  IV—(a) Roses In the Morning,  Bainuei -Richard Gaines; (b) Heffie Cucoo Fair, Martin Shaw; (c) Prayer, George Siemonn; (dj Spring, George Henschei.  Folk Songs.  V—(a) Rosa, Flemish; (b) Believe Me if all those Endearing Young Charms, arranged by William Arms, lush; <e) The Nightingale, arranged >y Howard Brockway, Kentucky; (d> Zerbrochene Ringlein, German; (e) Rom Kjyra, Norweigian echo song. George Siemonn will be ut the piano.  The third of the Pro Ane numbers will be Miss Ruth Draper in her monologues on the evening of February SI.  Tea Room to Open.  The Highland Park Tea Room will be opened Friday for the season. The place hasbeen handsomely refitted for the occasion, and Mrs. John B. CorlisS  of Lh* roit will pour tea on the opening day for a number of her friends. The H Uhland Park Tea Room has w n  popularity in the past.  Hon. G. Tillman Holley, member of the Aiken delegation in the General Assembly, has been confined to his  home by illness for seveiui Jays, and na- bren unable to be in Columbia this week.  John Wright, a well known farmer residing near Aiken, was taken wife custody Monday and a charge of violating the prohibition law lodged era inst him after Deputy Sheriff Nol-lie Robinson and State Constable Hart had found four gallon# of moonshine whiskey in Mr. Wright’s seed barn. Mr. Wright denies any knowledge of the liquor, claiming that some one is trying to "frame” him. He appeared before the clerk of court and gave bond.  MALARIA EXPERT HERE  TO STUDY CONDITIONS  weevils arc still present in  lie i  a second application may be it id • r. week later, For this firs. app -ti n  e.fhtr Ro rn t -made molasses t aim Arse rate mixture (I pound eau urn arsenate, I gallon molasses, :o !  Ion cf wa tor i or dry calcium arseno dust may be us I.  .'gins to bloom, th “du?£hg rn-th I  After cotton bi •calc Ta rn arsenate the most reliable arc recommend it -ifcat'cn of an; her'poison.  ‘lusting should h i , per cent of the sq: a , tincture and at lea.-: of from i to 6 pounds  profitable,* and  r  et tenet* to apses mixtu tv or  ti v r*t*n Hi Min how weevil 3 application# per a* re should  be made to keep infest.**.:  4 i belove 20  per rem until after a full crop of bu. k  has been set and these have become wall grown.  7. Ducting Machine#.—-Of ho du.-t mg machines used rn us a t year we recommend the following.  Hand Dusters:    Ii it, N agura,  Phceny, and Doseh.  •• 0-1 ler* e Fhree-Row Machines: Niagara and Iron \gv.  Mule-Bark Du ,ti r , ueh a tin It > t and Niagara may he u- od en i mg • ’and w a ore a vet} ontio nub im ava la- k  Nod o’ bf Ufo oho h >s v  .wo-re vv u ti rs‘ . * . yr.Ai i or; r  i v. Hie Morgan type, ho a . and  ti-Lave wore the* best a rd a ....  ' her* vs JI probably he he! « r dun , ag nae bine# available this rn I oar any that w’e use I last year, out I we ai - rn ply giving af- rn: rio.. In ■  ‘ co nee; -ng the ones we have used  For the purpose of making a study jf malarial conditions in the impended waters hereabouts, E. H. Gag*, assistant sanitary engineer of the United Slates Public Health Service, has come to Aiken county, having been sent here upon the request of the Aiken County Health Depar mer.t. Mr. Gage is making headquarters in North Augusta tor- the present, but his wort. will be confined very largely to Horse-oreek Valley, in which there arc a j number of bodies of impounded -wa era.  Although the malarial index of Aiken county is not very largo, thoro is a certain amount of malarial germs in the waters, and the county will ‘oubtles# be very much bene lit fed ny >ason of the study of Mr. Gage ar. I I bis recommendations, as steps will hereafter be taken to remedy the situation.  The Aiken Preparatory School on  {he Isl of February, begins its second term with a full complement of boys and a keen anticipation of the Spring activities. These include besides the necessary intensive schoolroom training lor the Boarding School June en-trance examinations, preparations for the annual track events and the presentation of the school play.  The Schools scholistic record ha* iieen very brilliant :n the past and promises well for the future with the material at hand. Old Aiken boys arc doing splendid work at the various boarding-schools, particularly at St. Pauls School, Concord, N. II.  The annual sports day, or field track events, will be staged as usual on Washington’s birthday February 22nd. Short dashes, long distance races, broad and high jumping, relay and obstacle races make up the programme, deluding a Mothers Race in which the mothers of the boys do the best to I < mulate their sons.  The school play this year will be the delight of Gilbert and Sullivan tom ic opera The Mikado. Rehearses are now in progress and on March . 19th the boys wul Aa* heard in the : meftil a mo,sphere of old Japan on I their open-air theatre in the school j grouids. As always on both occasions all Aiken is welcome.  Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock is th;- founder of "The Aiken Preparut ny S -bool for It iv- " There h i I been a bing felt reed f>.r a bool of sinh tarai-  it g VV her i he < ii ’a. of h - r,. -n -.r  .cf the winter colon’, cauld p lib t • if a ..it* rs, and A k n , ox em.of . * rn..ta was the \ re,:; *t im lucern en i •'  th.* <•,-.;a Lshme: *. u, tm , • .••'* h o**.  Given house. ^    jW,    P.    BLACKWILL  A. E. Walbridge, New York, Sween- '    8BCUTAIT    OW    BTA    FR  ey eotega    ,    ..  W. F. Hadley, Quebec, Osma Hut-] Columbia.—W. P. Blackwell, for the  past four and one-half years chief  Jerk in the office of Secretary of State,  son house.  Mrs. F. W. Bird, East Walpole, Mass., Herman Hahn house.  F. S. Von Stade, New York. Holliday cottage.  Mrs. Joseph T. Lei ter, Chicago and Washington, "Ridgley Hall.”  George H. Chipchap*, Boston, Schul S hofer cottage  wan Wednesday elected to be Secretary  of State to fill the unexpired term of VV. Banks Dove, who died last week at  his home in Columbia. Mr. Blackwell defeated Miss Gertrude Walker, who f ir more than 20 years has been employed as stenographer in the offlco  Miss Bertha Stevenson, Boston,  ant ^    bmith    of Walhalla. Ilia  Staubes cottage.    election was by the General Assembly,  Mrs. Oliver T. Wilson, Lake Forest, U™* the vote fas as follows: Blackwell, ISI., "Pebble Ledge.”     1  ‘ * Miss Walter, 69, Smith, 5.  Dr. C’harlts Penrose Philadelphia, I Interest is felt in the election of a Fell cottage    member of the Railroad Commi*aion t   Joseph Stevens, Jericho. L. I.J  lh * term of K. J. Wade of Mont-Stcvens house    morenci having expired. There are  L. S. Steenkan, Long Island, Mc- several candidates, and the election Murphey bungalow.     w *» « (>ne int0  Wednaday, but no one  Mrs. Edward Hines, Evanston. HL, re iving a majority the election was J. C* Thomas Cottage.    postponed. Mr. Wade is opposed by  Russell Grace, New York, Pardue . G. L. We&singer of Ria kviile, S. C. Cottage    '    Blease of Saluda urn! R. B. Cunning-  J E. M. Byers, Pittsburg, Mouse- ’  ;im of  Allendale, trap”  J I livers. Pittsburg, Ryer C t IHE LYBR\ND BANKRUPT  ESTATE IN LITIGATION  (age.  Ms a Gladyi Livermore, Nbw York,  Oakley Cottage.  Mr . Marshall Russell, Newport, unkrur-t «stile of J, « Lyorand and  ,, W. Sawyer, ha# bf ught an action     JN >»RA i I LA I IO          “Mr. Ted” _____________      p i; .* tor m    • s ti' •      I ’ I.. • ■ r it f : I ■' I    it o:h os      irthday. "Mr. Twl”    HS h- IS      •ceti with hi# usa:    .‘ii re J 'Hi I  ii kii fly I      md g* r ia! hun IcUs         W. J. PLATT & COMPANY  The Rexall Store    PHONE    7    Aiken    Pharmacy   

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