Aiken Courier Journal, October 19, 1876 : Front Page

Publication: Aiken Courier Journal October 19, 1876

Aiken Courier Journal (Newspaper) - October 19, 1876, Aiken, South Carolina Courier - Journal. VOLUME 2—NUMBER 103AIKEN, S. C., OCTOBER 19.1876 MAIL ARRANGEMENTS. Aikek, S. C., July I, 1874s On anti after this date the Postoffice hours will be as follows : Daring the week from 8:30 a. rn. to I 90 o'clock p. m., and from 3 to 7 o'clock p. rn. OLD SERIES, VOL. 6-NO. 303 ^ MAILS. Northern. Wwtcrn.s * Charleston I Columbia.s1 OPENS. IO a.to. Ilia. in. 4:30 p. rn. 4:30 p. rn. CLOSES. 3:30 p. rn. 3:30 p. a. 9 a. a. 9 a.m. & 3.90 pm Dunbarton, Hammond and Oreenland mails sksM on Thursdays at 6 p. rn., and epa* on Saturdays at 5 p. rn. Leesville; Merritt’s Bridge and Mi. fibal mails close on Sundays at I o’cleck p. rn., and open on Tuesdays at 5 o’clock p. BEU E. CONDY, P. M. THE AIKEN ARRESTS• Since our last issue, in which n staled that warrants of arrest were to be issued against a large number of the best cilice os of* our county, for participation in the Ellenton affair, many of #hdtn were not within 15 or 29 miles of that place at the time, andor the direction of Canton and Blackwell, who were sent here by Corbin to work up the case, has been going steadily on up lo this time. .And-, if we are rightly informed by Deputy U. S. Marshal* Bar-deen, who made ti e arrests in this neighborhood, is now about consumated —there being only two or three who are too ill to come to town, who have not voluntarily come in and given bail in the amount of 92,000 for their appearance at the United States Court, at Columbia, on the fourth monday in November next. Tile bail in all cases was readily obtained, the host citizens of the place coming forward and offering to bail the accused to any amount required. The following is a list of those parsons again* whom warrants of arrest were issued, and who have given bail : Goo W Croft, F W Coffin, Leighton ^Finley, O 0 Jordan, J L Courteney, J E Quinn, W W Williams, G O Moseley, G W Jloore, H B Burckhalter, John Blalock, M J Nevin, J J Williams, W Steed, Burril McLain, P B Page, F M Green, Luther Roundtree, J J Meyer, J P Hankerson* B Glover, J A Stallings, W E Bates, R E Tyler G Sum-tens, W W Parrott, W G Weathersbce, E B Tyler, J O Boyd, John Halkerson, (colored) Glover Turner, Alonzo Hai ley ■(the husband of the'lady who was beaten) II H Weathcrsbee, F W Westhers-bee, Barney Foreman. Isaac Foreman, Sr, Isaac Foreman, Jr, Jacob Foreman Sr, Jacob Foreman, Jr, W O Foreman, Richard Fuse Win Key, Kindred Key, Charles Roundtree, John Widener, K J Tyler, Scott Tyler, J L Green, Wra Williamson. 0 Low, J A Bates, Ben Dicks, W T Ro ta sey, T H Hankinson. Gen Foreman, Glover Foreman-, T Hair-fcerson, James Bates, Shade Radford, Joi.n Foreman. Win Foreman, Jesse Foreman, H Tyler, Chas Wrise, Pich Weatbersbee, riheo Hankerson-, Job ’Roundtree, Barney Foreman, Jeff Weathersbee, Ha mp W eathersbee, Jack >Dicks, Kit Lee, James Baddy, J Grren. Wm Frecmond, H Freer,loud, W W Miller James Gobi,. Angas P Brown, Pass Wilson, Tom Meyer, Chas Holley-* Luther Holley, AV nj Turner, C Glover. Samuel Hem, Wade Lamar, F Hankerer, C Hankinson, C Simkins. E Dicks. Job Tav. ll, Wm Tavell W T Butts) Boysey Ramsey. THE RAD IC A L RALLY\ The Grand Radical Rally which cline off on Tuesday, the 17th instant, was a decided failure, so far as the speaking wee concerned, and still more so in the attendance and interest manifested by the colored people, who attended the gathering, which was confined almost aatfaly to those dwelling in Aiken and ha •adiate vicinity. At no time during tile day were there more than three hundred people upon tile ground at*' one time, and fully three quarters of these *ere women, children, cue venders and ancient mantuas. Both Chamberlain aud Elliott, for south reason or other, failed to put in an appearance. Have those two worthies given up the fight in this county, or do they think that the chickmi hstaber aud the little limping tailor uui mbhdhe game in Aiken county without Amir assistance ? Nous farrows* The emoting was addressed by Congiuesmeu Emails, Secretory of State Hayne} Pdhuend a plug hat, mutton-chop, dKiskerdfcJefiow from Charleston) wfromadka veaybitter incendiary speech, Billy efsaHing that of the fanatical chickea-hatdier, of Camp Butler. The applaum In the case of all the speakers, was weak and given by a sign. A tap of the drum, a groan from the trombone and a blast from the horn, was the signal for applause, whioh was generally given with but very little vim. The meeting broke up at quite an early hour) when the band followed by a dilapidated rabble of both sexes; composed of the rag tag and bobtail of the colored element of the town, escorted the speakers down to Stooey’s tailor shop. After which followed by two youthful darkies mounted upon ancient mules, the cortege yelling like demons, filed away in the distance whan .Aa lawn resumed its wonted quiet, -quite unlike a Radical rally of the olden time, when Moses was a ruler in the land and Darnel was his Attorney-General and right hand man to help him cheat and humbug the peo people. { i — This government is a union cf Slates—of equal States—if it he any union at all. There eau be no union in a^espoTism. There can be no union of States and provinces. If our southern | peacefully to their respective home people expect to receive any of the bless-! within three days from this date, and CHAMBERLAINS DE SPERA TE CAME. The desperate game which Governor Chamberlain is attempting to play in South Carolina, by introducing the military and martial law, for the purpose of intimidating Democratic voters in the confine: election, will prove a perfect failure in Aiken and Barnwell counties. *All the people ever expected and desired was a fair open election aud an honest count, and that they are del ermined to have martini law or no martial law. And then when the matter is decided, as probably it will be on the 7th of November next, let those who have attempted to usurp the liberties and enslave a united people, who are determined to assert their manhood and he free, look to themselves— for there is a point beyond which patience ceases to he a virtue, and in the opinion of many that point is near at hand^ GRANTS PROCLAMATION. Washington. D. C., October 17.— A full Cabinet except Fish. Chandler leaves to-night for New York. The President has issued a proclamation, after a long preliminary referring to tile state of affairs in South Carolina. The proclamation commands ad persons engage'! in said unlawful and insurrectionary proceedings to disperse and retire Isings possible to a union of States, let them adjust themselves to their obli«*a-^tions to the union. If our northern ^people expect to continue to receive the ^blessings possible to this un on, let them Mise all their arist of wisdom , justice and kindness to make the States of the South feel at home in the union. hereafter abandon said combinations) and submit themselves to the laws and constituted authorities of said State. There is not the most remote intimation. however, of any intention on the part of t he Federal Government to assist Gov. Chamberlain in depriving citizens of South Carolina of their private arms THE EARS ARE OPENED. The Attorney-General/' says the New York Herald, “is exhibiting a Bis-marckian force and determination. In relation to his order to the Marshals, he declares the Jaw shall be aa implicitly and promptly obeyed in every one of the Southern States as it is in every other part of the Union, and every agency and power needed to enforce it shall be energetically and unrelentingly applied.” The Houston Telegraph, tartly says that this official knows perfectly well that not one particle of evidence is in His possession to show that a single individual in the South, outside of his own scallawagging and carpetbagging party, proposes or even wishes to violate any of the laws of the United States.— His own party friends violate them every day.    He violates them, ami supports in their violation every Radical fol-lowerj and yet he swells and struts, and holds up his head, and pu^ out his breast, and spreads out his tail ib that turkey style which he thinks Bismarck-ian. aud talks loudly about the lordly way in which the South bae to be kept in order and in subjection. This Dogberry has more awkward lea), and Jess skillful cunning than any of Grant’s henchmen, and he succeeds in exposing all the tricks of the Radical policy in such a flagrant and offensive way that not only does he conciliate nobody and make no friends for his party measures, but he succeeds in estranging even those who were the supporters of his party, but ignorant of the iniquities it was attempting. Taft is a good beast to bear Radical, burdens, hilt his ears are too long to pass him off for a Hon; and roar he ever so loud, he is but a fraying ass still. The bayonet policy adopted in South Carolina elicits the following comments from the London Pall Mall Gazelle, a leading English journal : “The Federal troops have already been called to aid the State Government to keep order and secure freedom of clee -lion in South Carolina. The state of things is what the Chandlers and the Mortons and the Bout wells and the Butlers of the Republican party have been eagerly looking for. If they can resuscitate the hostilities of the civil war they have no difficulty in diverting the Northern mind from the less sensational question of reform, and then the election of Mr. Hayes will mean simply the prolongation of the present system with a new figure head. The attempt to turn the drift of the campaign aside to the question of Southern outrages will not, we may hope, be successful j for, as the most enlightened Americans perceive, the demoralization of the Republican party is due mainly, if not altogether, to the tact that politicians are able to prove themselves “righteous” at a cheap rate JOINT DISCUSSION AT CAIN HOY. White Men Ambushed—Two Men Killed and Thirteen Wounded. At a political meeting at the above named place on Monday last, in which a large party of Charlestonians, both Dem* ocrats and Republicans attended, M. P Connor and C. C. Bowen being of the number. A cowardly attack was made upon the unarmed whites by a large party of armed negroes, and two of the whites killed and thirteen wounded. It seems there had been an agreement made by the leaders of both parties, in order to avoid trouble, aud have a fair discussion, that no fire arms should be allowed upon the grounds. The negroes had a large number of muskets secreted in the bashes near at hand, and at a given signal the Republicans who were massed on the outside of the crowd to the number of over two hundred, made a rush-seized their guns and commenced an indiscriminate slaughter of the Democrats, who were gathered around the speakers stand. Seeing themselves betrayed and entirely without defense, the party made the best of the way to the town and steamer, which brought them from Charleston. Under the circumstances it is a wonder there were not many moro killed and wounded than there were. Sheriff Bowen did not return with the party and it is not known whether he is killed or wounded, probably neither, as Cainhoy is a Radical stronghold and would not knowingly do violence to a favorite chief. Campaign Texts.    { The Truth About tho Republican Party, LAND STOLEN FROM SETTLERS The total number of acres of public land bestowed in land grants by Republican Congresses is 296,000.000 ; the total area given away is 294.758 square miles, a larger area than that of Maiue, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Dela-aware, Maryland, Ohio and Indiana combined. The total area of all these States is only 256,200 square miles. WHAT MR. WHEELER'S RAILROADS HAVE COST. J he bonds issued to Pacific railroads by Republican Congresses which are now outstanding amount to $64,523,512; and the amount of interest paid by the United Stares, allowing by repay rn en t I by transportation of mails. &c., amount ■ to $25,171,013. ! FOUR THOUSAND MILLIONS SPENT BY ! I GRANT. From March 4th. 1789, to June 30th, i 1861. nr 72 years, the entire net ordi- ■ nary expenses of the Government were ! SI.581,706, 195 ; from June 30, 1861, ! To June 30, 1875, or 14 years, they j ""JM ------■■________________ Tuff of these were found in branch banks, and amounted to at least forty thousand dollars. The principal irregularities and frauds were practiced, however, at Washington. Here the money was not stolen directly, but, by means oi loans on depreciated securities. Five officers of the Freedmans Bunk wore connected with the Ring District Government, and loans were made on district securities which could not be sold for anything near their face value. The Bank was founded by a Republican Congress, administered by Republican officials, and stolen bankrupt by Republican thieves. And yet the Republican party claim to be the especial friend of the negro. by abusing tic South and associating j ;llllounted) exclusive of the public debt the South with the Democrats. Ila am bell a iaFs Uroclanuttion, to $5,220,250,756. The net ordinary expenses In ti to ten years of peace since 1875, are $2,034,233,412. The total I expenditures of the six years of Prest, j dent . G rant’s administration, ending | with June 30, 1865, $3,008,438,451. I the facts about south carolina. I The property valuation in South Car- ! Olina amounted in 1860 to $490,000,- I OOO ; in 1870 it was $170,000,000, a j decline of 67per cent. The tax levy j amounted in 1860 to $500,000 ; in ' 1873 to 82,700,000, an increase of j nearly 509 per cent. The legislative expenses amounted in i860 to $40,000; in 1973 to $291,000, an increase of; nearly 700 per cent. TUE F ii KED MAN’S SAVINGS. The total liabilities of the Fret-. .<• ms Savings Bank. December 31st    j .'JVO. were $4,004,875, "I* which 82,992033 . U-due to the >*0.000 colored depo/irors. tyr.mic.il Governor and * turbulent ne- I 0„e ,.f the causes of tho f.ilure of the gro militia -Ne* York War!,I.    I    ba„k    w,s tho l>xt(jnt of actions.- ’ The oore we learn about Chamberlain's proclamation the more clear our conviction grows that it is a master piece of villainy, Public opinion at the North is thoroughly aroused on this subject, and while many seem inclined to think thatthe technical disbanding of the clubs should b<t resorted to in avoidance of the technical objections raised by* the Governor, the idea of disarming the white population is treated with utter scorn. The members of these clubs have bought and paid for their own weapons, and even if they be denied the light of assecution together for military exercise * r improvement in maikman-ship, thot is no reason why they should be robbed and put at* the mercy of a Political Holes. — The Sioux war is over and ii troops will proceed to the taske of clee ing Hays in the South.— Boston Post. — The demand for reform is now ut heard in the Republican ranks.—Ball more Gazette. — Howell wrote the life of Hayes i four weeks. There wasn't much to c the* last three weeks,—Detroit Fn Pi ess. — Every vote cast for the Republica Ticket at tho State election is a vote fc Hayes and all the swindles and swind lera of Grant’s administration.— Cair Bulletin. “The Republican party is a part of convictions,'' said Bristow in one < his speeches. Yea, very; convicted c every ct ime in the catalogue of crime —and almost executed—iVuxhville .Im erican. It is plain to all observing moi that tho Southern radicals are dobber ately attempting to get up race riots i the South. At Senatobia, in this State and recently in Louisiana and Soufci Carolina, their intention is made s plain that no fair person can longe doubt it.— Vicksburg Herald. Hic politicians who affect so mud affection for the^boy in blue love hie only on condition that he will vote ai their side, aud nut because he risked hi |ifo on the field of battle to preserve th< union. The sooner the blue uniform; and the gray disappear from our nation al politics the better will it be for th< country.—AT Y. Herald. I he peace and good order whic! have attended the late elections in Ala bania and Arkansas gives the lie dlH'c to all the allegations of the outrage mongers, and we greatly mistake publi sentiment in the South if, in the future the same peaceful and orderly spirit ii not maintained.—Memphis Appeal. — An udujated and inquiring foreign el* writes of the American sustemt— /T ais seemingly complicated .system re duces itself to a beautifully simple anc symmetrical formula. The office-holder: elect the Congressmen, aud the Cor: grossing!! appoint the office-holders.— This is the real American constitution in a nutshell. — It should be remembered that i the Democrats had been iii power in th Senate, the expenses of the irovernmen would have been reduced $40. 000.000 instead of $30,000,000. S. that the people have gained 830,OOO,00< by electing a Democratic House, ani loss $10,000,000 by not. having a Dem ocratic Senate. — Peoria Democrat. — This sudden and general determ in at ton to carry the campaign on th Southern issue shows a deep and uncon trouble alarm among the Republica leaders. They are evidently panic si 11.-ken. They have by this tune coon po * I notes, and their conelnsiOR ap pears to be that on a fair and hones canvass, on the real issue of the yea] the- will lose the country,—*New Yoe Heralds. ;

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Publication: Aiken Courier Journal

Location: Aiken, South Carolina

Issue Date: October 19, 1876

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