Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Aiken Courier Journal: Saturday, March 18, 1876 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Aiken Courier Journal (Newspaper) - March 18, 1876, Aiken, South Carolina                                 €l)c Courier-Jwnritnl.  WR  VOLUME 2—NUMBER 72  AI KEN, ss. C., M ARCH I 8. I 876  MAIL ARRANGEMENTS, lib:  OLD SERIES VOL. i,— Nf ).*?>  :if  Aikfn, S. C., September I, \> . •.  On ?n<i after this date the Postnflicfc hovrs "iii re as fellows ;  During Hie week from 8:30 a. in. to I 30 o’clock p. rn., and from 3 to 6 o'clock p.  LOCAL aff airs  rn.  MAILS.    OPLK S.  North 1  rn,. Western... Charleston:  Calumba'! I*  10:30 a. rn. 10:30 a. m :30 p. rn. 4:30 p. m.  CLOSE  9% 30 a, rn. & 3 p. in  3 p. nu rn rn  m«* no sh u;il m ikl* at.non cut  for  ! llfiHi ; and who is suppo eel ti. be  ________-___-______  ablet. do it with the same grace, force j .Th* Court of - c.crnl Se-siona for and    a-    those    of    near    kinship    I j Aiken county will convene '.ereon    Mon-  father who reared then, i,, ,he lear  I he  and nduioni’tiui of tho niuiiuhty d< liar I The to ieIi ul*> nj the ancient Psalmist, w ho recommend* the frequent use of the  day next, March 20ih. his Honor Judge Mali: r presidio  The Sr. Thaddeus Church fair, held torch, is n , lo h wed nowadays. Every *    ‘    Lyceum Hall on Thursday eve*'  ts  Dunbarton, Leesville, Hanna* nd, Greenland, Merritt’s Bridge and Mf. Ebal mails close on Sundays at I o’clock p. rn., nm, •open on Tuesdays at 5 o’clock p. in.  E. CONDY, P. M.  CHIEF JUSTICE MOSKS IN TE I ll&  The above title constitutes the heading Of ail interesting dispatch from Olu nihil on Tuesday last. Th® incidents related are very path* ic, and the evidence so damning as to effectually settle the fate of Judge Montgomery Moses and probably bring the Muses dytiaty forever to an end in South Carol inn.-^Verily, the way of the transgressor is hard yet the wicked heed not the sons or cease from troubling, but go on peculating and kicking against the pricks, until brought to the Bar of Justice by the inexorable Netnises, which follows the footsteps of villany, which ever way the culprits flee.  The way the Chief Justice came to 1-e mixed up in this impe achment case will be shown by the billowing :  ning last. was  an entire success, and  young J i, ob, Isaac and Solomon taught ad lirion, sub racfci* n, uiuhiplica- I  u,uc h enjoyed by all concerned, ti »n,    ,    d    ubl«*    and compound in- ‘  terest., ar,  1  elmr^ d never tt> forget the main ch nee of “put down one and take  un six ; hnaJs !  " in, tales you loose,”  ‘‘Chief Justice. Moses was next calh'd to explain win he had refused to pay the note. I he Chief Justice ascended the Stand and v as asked byroad what w >s on the hack of the in te, which, hr did as follows :    ‘Tins    due bill is unpaid and  due October 13th, 1870. F. J. Moses.’ When asked to explain the note the Chief Ju slice said this position is pot a pleasant one ; but I am here to obey the law and answer any and every question that is proposed. The Chief Justice hero burst into tears, anu> it was only after some time Mid severe exertion of will on his part-that he was able^o prr? ■eeed further. He finally continued :— Yes, tkift is my signature. Some time ago. about three weeks I presume, I was sitting in the libraiy and Mr. Lake came in with a njemlrer of the Senate, win presented him to me. He told me that ho. had a oole Uj on me. I was surprised as I was not aware that I had anv paper out, and could not coiler ive ho* he c« ald have any. Mr. Luke seemed 8 mcwhat perplexed himself. J presume through regard a d-courtesy for mc, aud then chowed me this note, and I said yes, this is my signal urb. but I don’t consider th#t I owe it. I told hun that my brother had a weakness upon this subject, that he was under the impression that I owed the rn te, but it was a mistake. I asked Mr. Lake why he did not communicate with me sooner. He s lid that he didn’t like to press me. Now, upon the I ack of thia note is written thatthe due bill is unpaid ami due. But I will explain ii. I WTo e it to preve nt family difficulty. My brother and myself had been in business for many years. Of* course I Wits in full practice when he came to the bar. I took him into practice with cie and made him cashier ol the concern; the basil.es> was good, aud he kept all the money. W hen I wanted money I went to him and gave him a note f ir the amount. Xiii* note is one of those papers, and the notice on the bank is all that keep- it I rom being beyond the statute of limitation. Even had the note been due by me I have more than sufficient of his uotea since the war to c »vcr it. If, upon a settlement between us. it be shown that I owe him money I will pay it, a au if he owes me I presume he will do the same.’ This testimony was delivered with great effort by the Chief Justice, whose utterance was frequently choked by sobs ”  V? hat wonder is it. then. that we have bribe taking ministers and secretaries, eon apt Judges and Governors, not. fo mention lesser . ublic robbers and rascals, ai) the way down to thieving Probates aud corrupt County Commissioners ?  The South f a’olina Railroad Company have placed -tops at the entrance of th< Schuetzen Paik. for the convenience of pissengeis arriving on extra I rains,  GOK (ITA MB EUL A IN OPPOSES THE IMPEACHMENT OF JUDGE MACKEY.  Governor Chamberlain is out in a new role. This time it is no “red-shirt’ Morton totter, in defence of Republicanism and himself in particular ; nor is it an attack upon the corrupt Mo«es-Whipper gang ; but as an ardent defender of one who figured conspicuously in the notorious b ack  A YOUN<• couple who were married in Columbia on the 20th of last month, would like to know on what day to ce ebrate the first ann ive rsarj of their wedding.  All communications, advertisements local not cos &c., intended for publication in this paper, must positively be handed in by IO o’clock on Fridays ; otherwise th y will be left over for the next issue.    .    *  [For The Courier-Journal.  YE EDITOR.  W t learn from the Charleston News and (burier that the Governor has extended the time for paying tuxes iv all tho counties of the State, to the Isl of April. Alter that time the penalty will attach.  That excellent farmers friend, the Southern Cultivator, printed at Athens, Georgia, is on our’tab e. This number  The Augusta Constitutionalist says that “on Sunday night last. G. W. Ba* ker. of Graniteville, had his store entered by burglars, who stole goods to the amount of nearly $500. On Monday Mr. Baker went to Augusta and b ught a quantity of goods to replace those stolen, and loaded them in a special car, which was taken to Graniteville and placed on the sidling. Yesterday morning, Mi: Baker went to the car to unload it, when, to his astonishment, he discovered that overnight the car had bern broken into, and nearly ail the goods he bad purchased in Augusta were stolen. No clue to the thieves in cither case has been discovered.”  Ye editor sits in his easy chair,  A rocking him to aud fro ;  I wonder what he’s thinking about That seems to trouble him so ?  It may be vc currency question That clouds his thoughtful brow ; For rbat’s a knotty subject That puzzles ye sages now.  from east to west and north and south Ye batiks are breaking down ;  It uiusi be thai aud nothing else That makes ye editor frown.  $  0> y^s I it’s that, I’m sure it is, for I heard him -ay to day A note w .h due that he must meet,  And nvver a dime to pay.  I herod.iy affair is full of excellent reading matter. which elevated those immaculate wor-  Yes, it certainly is a crying shame for the old Chief Justice to have such u graceless brace of scamps in the family as Montgomery and young Frank. And we don’t blame him or say that it is any disgrace to him to be lachrymose on the subject—on the contrary, we think it docs him credit. If we were in any way related to either of those worthies  thies to the bench* The .nummary of of fafets in the case stand about thus ihu cit zens of Lancaster county had,, in mass meeting determined to appoint a committee to go to Columbia and lay the matter of Judge Mackey’s conduct bG-f re the Legislature. One of the charges preferred is that Judge Mackey per mi tied the execution of stephen Young, when he was notified that the jury which t.*i« d him was wholly illegal. Charges of bribery, false arres*s and tv ran ny are also reiterated. Whether all or any of these charges are true or not. remains to be seen ; but the general opinion seems to be that there is nothing in Judge Mackey’s career as a judge that would render it impossible or at all improbable that he would commit such arbitrary and tyranical acts as are laid to his •barge. In the discharge of the notorious kindling thief. Parker, he allowed himself to be made use of to defeat me ends of Justice. A more outragous and defiant act is not found chronicled in the history of the bench of any civilized county. The Moses-Whipper faction may count upon the Judge as a valiant and puissant friend, but it is pretty evident that Conservatives aud friends of good government owe him nothing more than strict justice,  Id an interview with a reporter of the Uni on-Herald, tie Governor suid he had no function in connection with the impeachment of a public officer ; and while after impeachment had taken place it might not be proper for him to express opinions, yet before impeachment he had as much right to hold ana express opinions us any one else. And then the Governor went on and express cd hts opinions very warmly, waxing warmer and warmer, against the Impeachers and their manner of doing business, like a lawyer speaking for his client, until he came to near the close of the long interview, when he said : “A great effort wa^ made to prejudice my mind against Judge Mackey in advance in this matter, aud I have waited till the niovenient developed itself before hold ing or expressing any decided opinion ; but I now have such evidences from manys rn roes Blat the charges are grossly unjust and unfounded, and put forward from the worst of motives.” And », no doubt, will the many readers of  Subscription price, $2 OO a year. Send for its  What has become of the* Aiken bands 'I We don’t want to arouse the brass l orn and the sweet and dulcet strains ol the big fiddle and base drum, but would like to know if they have gone up with the general wreck and crash of things  Attention, Aiken H. At L. Co ■No. I. At ten J the regular monthly meeting of your Company, at the Truck House, on Wednesday evening, March 22d, at 7*} o’clock. By order of the President. B. B. Randall,  Secretary.  James Green, a negro living in Charleston, has two wives, one of whom is treasurer of a society. Groen stole the key of her trunk, and made off with the charity box belonging to the society. He bas not been heard of since.  The Augusta Constitutionalist, of Thursday, says  ;  “At a meeting held last evening, the SchueUen (dub rescinded the resolution to have their Fest on the 19th and 20th ol April, and passed another resolution to have it occur on the 16th, 17th and 18th of May. The Club will atte nd die Aiken celebration on the 19th and2t)thof April.  Rather a Grange case came up before Trial Justice Keenan’s court on Wednesday—kidney Burckhalter being arrested by a news boy on the South Carolina Railroad for highway robbery. in taking his cap. while he was asleep on  the train, on Monday evening last._  Burckhalter swears that he knows nothing of the nim ter, only that he found the head gear in hi3 pocket when he arose in the morning, and immediately came down :md deposited the same with Trial Justice Keenan ; bas no idea how it came i i his possession ; supposes N. R. Wiiiiau«s, an attachec of the South (’aroma Legislature, who wok in the cur with him, must have put i r  in there to keep his hand in and play off a joke on him. NY illinois testifies that such is not the case, A proposition was made to con pound the felony for the sum od $5 OO, but Burckhalter concluded to give bail for his appearance next Monday, when he threatens to arrest the newsboy for a three card monte man.—. I he case was conducted and will be ably argued by counsellor Loomis, of the Aiken Bar.    \  Now whac’ll he do, ye editor—  Dear reader, I question you*  Win owe him cath and will rot pay_  Flay, what will ye editor do?  Shall he *ue the bills and collect them ?  I bat seem8 the only way To lo with delinquent debtor*,  Who can hut will uot pay.  YABCAM.  MINOR LOCALS. '  Two thirds of the taxes of Aiken county h ive b‘en collected.  Fur ni.'hed and unfurnished apartments to rent; apply at this office. -  Several communications are unavoidably left over for another issue. *  Green peas have made their appearance in the Aik sn market.  The rain on Thursday last was muck  needed.  become of the Aiken  What has Grange ?  In this issu* we will publish the Sheriffs sales tor the month of April  The Mallet and the Speaker.  The farmer* af Aiken county have invested hevilv in fertiiliers thin season.^  The little mallet with which the presiding effieer in the hou*-e punctuates it* proceedings is a fatal instrument iii the  Bask ball hasbeen revived in Augusta. aud the boys  N  re happy.  ti end fix cc Loomis have just received j a iiesb lot of Florida oranges.  Henry Williams, who was so badly  hands cf Cox. It is curious to note the !  ( * ufc a few weeks  bjtOeorgc Wash-  M  the Govern* r s special pleading, in favor «»i the corrupt    rn------^    ,  black Thursday” Judge, see the cat in the meal tub aud come to a decided opinion that a new secret Radical Ring has been formed, in which  Governor Chamberlain is che hub and  Judge Mackey one of the principal spokes in the wheel.  by the tics of consanguinity, we should ^rc*  in  *«© wheel.  feel bound to get up a shower of tears House has voted^i^ffi 6 ^ 11    t ^ C  ^   a | 80  T JUT  . ,    Mouse tooted in indefinitely Pompon e  It is perfectly meta and proper the charges againat Judge Mickey 1 ]° ?G   There is a beautiful.little gem of a picture to be raffled for at Luhn’s Drug Si ore. It was painted by u talented )uung Southern lady, and is entitled “Mater Doloroso.” Go a*id take a chalice ut it, und if you win it you will possess a joy forever, a lid "own the prettiest thing of the kind that he* been in in Aiken for a long time.  Stabbing Affray,—We learn that a serious cutting scrape occurred at Cochrane’s Landing, below Lower Silver Bluff, on the Savannah River, Monday night, which may result in the death of a well known young man. It is reported tint Frank Green had business to transact with the widow of the late Mr. Cod mine, and in the course of the conversation incidental to the business in hand, used such language as to cause Mrs. Cochrane to complain to her brother, Jefferson Williams, that Mr. Gieen had acted ungentlemanly. Mr. Wil Hams became very much enraged, and, drawing a knife, attacked Mr. Green, and stabbed him in nearly twenty placer. The condition of the wounded man is precarious.  I hr Aiken 8 ‘hit«^t*en boys are mak-ing preparations to have a grand time on the 19th and 20th of next month.  The River bridge between Augusta and Hamburg bas been undergoing  repairs.     J:   Th* trees around town have commenced budding, aud everything hue tho appearance of sprier.  power of weakness which comes out in I  ,,,sfton » * ,a8  almost entirely recovered.  -    I    I    *■  the handling «I the gavel. To use it  promptly, at the right time and spar—  * n Kb’>    (he secret of success in the  chair.    The slightest into* pew nc e   with the gavel vitiates quickly the power of any presiding officer. Mr. Kerr understands this. and never annoys the House*by frantic hammering. Mr, Cox’s* way is to keep up a petty pounding, which would give a blind person in the gallery the impression that somebody was putting down carpets below. Kerv’s gentle and deliberate, but emphatic and forcible manner, would almost enable him to dispense with the gavel in the ordinary proceedings of the House.—  When there is disorder, Mr. Kerr Joe* s  not juusp up and pound, and blisteringly add to the confusion, but he sits quietly in his chair, tells the House, iii a pleas  ant tone of remonstrance, that “there ' stores are now being erected. is so much confusion in the hall that it is impossible to go on with the business of Ae House,” and remains silent uutii members have settled into their seats and the confusion is diminished, so that  A negro boy. seven or eight year* old) fell into a well at. J. J Tyler’* house a few days wince, and was drowned.  The farmers in Silverton and Sleepy Hollow townships are planting lars'o gfain crops this season.  Ellenton, on the Port Royal Rail road, is growing  v ^ry fast. Two new  For . Sale.—Fifty bushels of sweet potato slips. Price, $1 per bushel.— Apply to D. Yates, Aiken, S. O.  Fine pickled Iambs tongues; shad  any member’s voice can be heard across j  an( j  ot h er     fresh fish,    at    the    fcxeelsior  the hall. A prominent member of the ! Saloon House insinuated to mc, the other day. ^  that Mr Kerr was a better speaker than i TriERE    .rill be 3    227    acres    of    Und  even Blaine ; that Mr. Plaint excited  old  ny  tho Sheriff of this countv on  the House by his rapid manner ami his  s *dosday in April next.  energy of utterance, frequently amus- ; Don’t fail to attend the lecture at the ing ani.-monisms, and adding heat to the j Presbyterian Church, this afternoon, ct debates. The House feared Mr. Blaine; j 4 o’clock. it respects Mr. Kerr, and his speakership is thus far* mt*re successful than •    ^ merchant down town sells more  many *•!’ his own friend* thought u |  f  f Hr. Millis s Cough Syrwp than any could he.— Washington Letter in Boston I other medicines together. It surely  must be the bust remedy for ii ^pugK  Herald.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication