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Aiken Courier Journal: Saturday, February 12, 1876 - Page 1

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   Aiken Courier Journal (Newspaper) - February 12, 1876, Aiken, South Carolina                                 Courier - Journal.  VOLUME 2 ^-NUMBER 67  .A.2KI3IN', S. C., FEBRUARY 12. lBTU  MAIL ARRANGEMENTS.  Aiken, S. C., September I, 1874.  On and after this date the Postoffice dionrs will be as follows :  During the week from 8:30 a. rn. to I 30 o’clock p* rn., and from 3 4q 6 o’clock p. rn.  MAILS.  Northern.. Western... J Charleston: 'Columbia.. 1   OPENS.  10:30 a.m. 10:30 a. m 4:30 p. rn. 4:30 p. rn.  CLOSES.  0:30 a.m. & 3 p.rn 3 p. rn. rn  rn  Dunbarton, Leesville, Hammond, Greenland, Merritt’s Bridge and Mt. Ebal mails xslose on Sundays at • I o’clock p. rn., and open on Tuesdays at 5 o’clock p. rn.  E. CONDY, P. M.  ■TSE MOSES- WHIPPER LE GIS-4    LAT URE.  •If the evil element in the South Cur 'Olina Legislature is all powerful and dominant when united and led by wicked, mnprineiuled leaders, they have been so far cowed and turned from their vilau- 1  ous schemes by the unanimous condom nation of public opinion and the pres* of tho civilised world, us to attempt to go helund or .get around the election of Moses and Whipper to the bench. That they are heartily sick of their work, ‘there is not a doubt. Thc^cniody with which they propose to ‘Cure or mend matters, and get rid of the two old men ‘of the sea, is, to say the least, bundling -and w«ti worthy the political quacks  1  who pr.ipose it. It is known as Whiti-morus*Pan&oea, and proposes to redistrict and reduce the judicial circuits drool eight to six, and in such a manner 'US to leave Moses and Whipper out in 'the cold, or in other words, without a bench to sit on or a circuit to officiate in. This plan is crude and has ‘too many objections to work well; and be* -sides, there is nothing said about any provisions being madejbr the election Judges to fill’the new circuits—and  Republican ism by tin; way he voted on that occasion, has now qurrs>led with hipper and calls him a rase I and an ingrate. And so the thieves nd Radical rascals go Kin, and probabl/ will continue to go on until, througlvthe grace of God, there is a radical change—and then nous verrims ce que nous ferron ; or, -n other words, we shall se* what we shall see.  OLD SERIES, VOL. 6.4&N0.267  local affairs  STATE dSTE^WS.    A bill has been hitfoduced in  the House providing for the drawing of new juries for Orangeburg county.  J. T. Thompson, tolored, of Lancaster, presented a forged order at  a store recently, but being cfetectad was flogged.    !  Arrangements are making to tax Orangeburg county an ptra three mills for a court-house. Tines are hard to be building court-houses these days.   Josh Billings will v|it Columbia next week.  Mir* Julia Smith, of Unjon colinty, was recently severely injured by a fall from lier horse.    *  It cost eight dollars jn Clarendon to convict a thief of steeling one hen. Expensive justice, j  Nine prisoners escaped from the  Horry county 3 ai I-en Sa turdiy night of ef last week.  The merchants of Walhalla are kept constantly employed, notwi th stand-  ing the tight times in the njoney market.  •..•** m Hon. duel B. Sfkippd*, of Horry tummy,-died last week. Aged 76 years.  — ------- . HW     »•••♦• Gov. Vance will lecture in Lan—  very likely there will be—and    neat    week,    in    aid of tho Ladies^  ge ESect and'Shaw wfflftfcoldf Oh ^^uo^4asociiitie^    J  W    *  «....• Dr. Joseph A. Keller, of Or— angeburg, died on Thursday night of last week.  Nbxt Monday will be St. Valentine’s Day.  THE CONVALESCENT.  The Sheriffs sales fos March will appear in our next issue.  R bad the advertising columns of The Courier-Journal, and patronize the men who advertise.  Very little cotton is brought to town now. We suppose our farmers are holding it back for higher prices.  A new lamp has been placed in front of the Presbyterian church door. A good idea.  The weather continues beautiful,_  There is said to be one third more visitors in town than ever before at this S jason.  A shooting affray occurred in Barnwell on Monday last, in which one young man named Hogg was killed and his brother fatally wounded^  Mr. W. B. McDaniel, nf the Columbia Register', spent a few days in Aiken this week, in the interest of that excellent paper. Subscribe for it,  A large ’possum in freut of Turnbull’s, on Thursday, caused considerable sport among the juvenile population of Aiken, who were endeavoring to ascertain the size of his jaw teeth.  Draw back the curtains, Marian, I would see  The blessed sun once more There now, that will uo.  Oh, how fair I It seems a glorious world all new ;  Truly the Lord is good—too good to me,  Who in His field hare been a fruitless tree-  How sweet, how fragrant now the roses are—  The rich perfume of Spring is in the air ;  Where merry birds are chanting in their glee.  It is so long now since I heard them last ;  A year, dear sister, is it not, since then  And oh, how blank the clays and nights have been J  How can they say the flight of time is fast?  Only in scenes of joy can that be so—  When ill betides, the clock hand moveth  SlOW -    MCRAY.  THE AMNESTY DEBATE.  Be rare and cai) for Dr Bull’s Cough Syrup, if you -are troubled with a bad Cough or Cold. It will give you relief. For sale by every respectable Druggist. One bottle 25 cents ; five bottles for $1.00.  ‘'the offices until new incunfberus Ated. When the question will be there is no doubt as to the Jeon of the Supreme Court ^ This point was made dong before the ‘election, and the Legislature was fully forewarned of the risk they were taking. “If this bill should become a law, Whip-per, Moses, Reed and Shaw would all he shelved, as might alap some of the others whose decapitations are not so desirable in view of the location of the electing  •o  power, and‘-the now too well known dispositions of those invested With it.  The idea of -legislating judges out of office is a new and a dangerous one at the best, and if it can be done this year it can be done next, year, or at any time hereafter, and the establishment ofsuch a precedent would go to make tile character of the judicial office as Insecure as that oi some of its incumbents.  Seine of the new circuits, again would contain six counties, and as the Judge has to hold three terms of che sessions each year, he would haveto hold eighteen terms, or a term and a half each month.  Another objection to the bill is that it places the two most important circuit  embracing th.* two largest cities in the  State, under the control of a single Judge, giving hi rn’enormous political influence, more work than one man could ’well perform, apd making a distinction in his salary and generally in his favor against the othi*r circuit judges. It is thought that upon the constitutional objections to the bill, Moses and Whipper would stand a much better chanoe before the Supreme Court than upon the four-year argument.”  From the low and angry growlings which are now and then heard from the Legislative menagerie at Columbia, it is evident that the animals are not entirely tamed or conquered, bud have only yielded ground through fear. Elliott, the prime inc ver in this infamous election business, and who said when the vote >tpa8 taken that he measured every man’s  The first anniversary celebration of the Methodist Sunday-School of Aiken  thM^rf^bba.h in  this month. The Presbyterian School has been invited to take part in the exercises.   ;  The  ginhousc of Mrs. M. Lee,  of Union county, was burned ou 7tfe instant.    Andrew Ward, of Pickens, was  accidentally shot through the arm while loading a revolver, on the 7th instant. The wound is very painful, and His arm will probably have to be amputated above the elbow.  • I he cotton stealers are on the rampage again in Laurens county. Six have recently been arrested.  An old colored woman was burned to death in Fairfield county last week.  ®°» cholera is raging i*i the lower part of Lexington.     Thc  taking Republics of Walhalla are said to be on the look out for a new congressional wit for the third dis  trust. The forces are being marshaled for the combat.  Mr. Charees E. Ediwondston^^s* been appointed, by Judge Mahetf as  Clerk of the Court of General Sessions ^ ____^______, I1U   and Common Pleas for Aiken scanty, to I cited friends and citizens of the town  fill f.VlA finarnlroJ    T____I. U\ ll    .  Arrivals at Mrs. Latham's._  Mrs. D. M. Osgood, Countess de Thiene, Paris, France ; Mr. and Mrs. Fred. G. Lee, Maud Stewart Lee and maid, Annie W. Phi liney, Cooperstown, N. Y.; Mrs. J. H. De Kay, Miss Julia DeKay’ Staten Island, N.Y ; Miss Louisa Mapes, Newark, N. J. • William A. Maupin Bait, M.D,, Miss Caroline Cox and maid, Master W. A. Gardner, Boston, Mass; Mrs. L. Richmond and child, Mrs. L.M.Towne,Plainfield. Conn ; J. Summers Beacham, wife and child, Baltimore, Md ; Prof. E. L. Richards, Yale College, Conn ; James M. Richardson, Boston, Mass ; R. Town, Esq., Brook-lyn, New York j O. 0. Dewey and wife, Mast et Chauncey Dewey, Miss Mary Jacobs, Wheeling, Y r a.    .    .     >   A COLORED man’s REASON FOR VOTING WITH THE DEMOCRATS.  Jere Haralson, the colored member of Congress from Alabama who voted for the Amnesty bill and was applauded by the Democrats, has written a curious letter to one of his friends in defense of bis political course. The letter is ad* dressed to Cashin,-a colored man, and Coon, to whom reference is made, is- a carpet-baggor of the Spencer stripe.— The following is the litter:  Highland Park Hotel Theatre. —Clipt. Coles’s original play of the ‘‘Carpet bagger” was performed at the Highland lark on Wednesday evening last, and was, to say the least, a capital and unique affair, both as an originals play and the rendition of thc same, by the amateur performers. The iarge dining hall, which is so arranged as to admit of being turned into an lecture hall or theatre on short notice, was filled by the guests of the house and the in  fill the unexpired term of Joseph Quash, deceased.  The Edgefield Advertiser chronicles the death of Mr. W. W. Adams, which occurred in that town on Sunday morning last. Mr. Adams was an old and highly esteemed citizen, and his loss is deeply felt by all who knew him.  That enterprising paper, the Marion Merchant and Farmer, begins its second year with a new dress. Open, fair, square aud outspoken ou all matters in which the welfare of the country is concerned, Captain J. D. Mc Lucas the editor and proprietor^ seems determined to make hi* paper a complete success, and worthy of the noble name it bears.  at an early hour. The large audience were charmed with the play arid players who were repeatedly encored. Love under difficulties, if one may so speak of an affair of the heart which went off so smoothly and was so satisfactory in its results—was most capitally rendered by Miss M. €- and    Mr. R. C ,  guests of the Park. Our protean friend. Mr. b n, the old war horse aud gar*  O  ...... Seven prisoners escaped from  the Marlboro jail last week  ....... Jackson Johnson was shot and  killed in Barnwell county last week, by Weslej” Brooks.  ...... I beamhouse of Martin Davis  of Union, was bb w „  down by  ,  ga]e 0Q   Sunday night last.    1,01,1  lots that were offer-  od six months agnat 8200 are now held at $1,000.    Cheraw is being visited by burglars. Several houses have recently been robbed.  An exchange says :  ‘A young man near Easton drinks  I JI •    -    _    .    ll  scalding water.  Note.—That’s nothing. There’s a youug man in Aiken who drinks lightning whisky, sleeps under the canopy of the stars, breakfasts ou dried apples, dines on raw turnips, sups on cow peas, and says he is happy when they dont undertake to water his tipple.  rick of the Aiken stage, was so much at home in the role of Old Somers, the shoddy army hat contractor, and cruel parient, that it was evident to all that the Captain must have had had him in his eye when he drew the character.— The contrast between the sympathising and unselfish wife and mother was very striking and capitally rendered by Miss 0-, of Rome, New York. But the     Mr -  Reub «n Chick, one of the  principal merchants and most highly esteemed citizen of Newberry, is dead     The tax  hooks of Marion coum  ty have been opened tor the collection of taxes.  Row on Broad Street, Augusta. —On passing up Broad street on last Saturday forenoon, we noticed an excited crowd surging and s waving around an individual who was mounted on top of a dry goods box in front of Y. V. Walker’s furniture store. At first we thought the mob were about to  great and crowning feature of the evening was the old Carpet-bagger himself, who, on this occasion, as Hezekiah Hawk, surpassed even himself both as an author and an actor. The hits and happy turns in the piece are many and to the point. Our sole regret—and we presume it was the same with the clithe audience—was this : that the real South Carolina animal did not bear some slight resemblence to the Captain’s hero, who proved co be no dynamite fiend in disguise, come to bear away the hard earnings of thc South Carolina taxpayers, but a long bearded, wingless 1  rough and ready agent from eldorado, who n Cupid had sent to Aiken on a mission of love. Since thc Captain has succeeded so well  Holse of Representatives. ] Washington, Jan. 19, 1876. J  Dear Cashin—Yours of the 15th instant to hand, and contents noted. I expected before I voted to hear a howl from those hell-hound* below ; but say to them all that, God being my help, I  shall meet them at Phillippi. Mv explanation for voting for general amnesty is :    (I) Because it is right above all.  (2) Because I was elected on that principle : our platform adopted at a Republican convention at Montgomery, 1874, says, ‘ that thc Republicans of Alabama demand the equal, civil arid political rights of all men before thc law.” (3j Because I ain a Grant man, and Grant recommended general amnesty. (4) Because the Colored man in the South wants peace and good will to all, and hatred to none, and asks for ©hers what he desires for himself—an equal chance in the race of life. We. as a race, cannot afford to aid in any manner in keening up strife for the benefit of office hunters.  Allow we to ask your attention to a few questions, which I trust you will put to Coon, Rapier, Curtis and others : Is it better for us colored men to forget and forgive, and have the good the world., or is it better for us to the cruelties of .the pa* suffer iii ordevthat fit thereby ? Do I represent principles of Republicanism and our party when’I strive lo put the seal of peace aud good will upon animosity ? Is it, not better that the leading colored men tub* this in hand and build up our race, build up our party, upon the «rue principles of right ana justice of Republicanism. and drive those who are striving to rise into office on prejudice into the blackest political hell ? Is it not the truth that such mon as Rapier, Coon, and others are the sole cause of our party being defeated iii Alabama today? Don’t you think that there are thousands of white men in Alabama who would gladly join the ranks of the Republican party aud help build up the party upon the strong principles of right, justice, good for all, and evil for none? We must drive out these hellhounds. and ga infer peace between the two races South *    *    *  Truly yours.  JERE HARALSON.  Aiken is the cheapest market for groceries in the United States. If* you do not believe it, we will refer you to the advertisement of S. C. Satterthwait , or what is better, call at the sf^re, as many articles and prices cannot be enumerated It is on Bark avenue, opposite th* Presbyterian church.  /     J  Valuable Property for Sale.  OFFER for sale my well-known plauta-  lynch  him, but on getting nearer we found it and struck an intellectual bonanza in  •.I    k    *  was not the man they were after at all, but the extraordinary cheap lot of goods that he wss auctioning off to the highest bidder.  the Carpet-bagger, may we not hope lie will exercise his prolific muse still further and bring out his evil aid aud coadjutor, the “seal la wag ?”  T — -......  ✓    ...............  A tion, one mile northeast of Aiken, containing 1.700 acres, oOO arable land, about 300 limier cultivation aud the balance is heavily timbered with pine, oak and bickerv. On the place is a tine water-power of 200 horse: also. saw mill* There is an orchard of 2,000 apple. IOO pear and 200 peach trees —also s?uppernong vineyard of 3 acres all in fine bearing order. The buildings consist of a a good dwelling, cotton house, corn house, carpenter shop, blacksmith shop, two go 'd barns and all other necessary out bu ii.lings, bes des several tenant houses.  For full particulars apply to or address DELAVAN YATES. fcb!2tf    Aiken,    S.    C.   

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