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Newport Daily News: Monday, August 23, 1965 - Page 1

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   Newport Daily News (Newspaper) - August 23, 1965, Newport, Rhode Island                                Weather Data Tltsday: Sat Kiatl t'M Seil A. M., P. M.; Low A. M., P, M. SUBMIT High 71, low H. Local Forecast Cltir, cooler lonlghl. Tomor- row sunny, less humid. (Detailed Report on Page 3) ESTABLISHED VOL. 139 NKWPOKT, li. I., MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 1965 20 PAGES PRICE SEVEN CENTS Vernon Ct. Adds Two New Halls Vernon Court Junior College; has acquired a Bellevue Avenue; mansion .and leased another en Xarragansclt Averti? lo meet: thr, expanding ncfds of 400 resi-' dent students, Dr. Franklyn Ashley, president, announced to- day. "Sunnylea" on Bellevue Ave- nue was purchased for 540.000 today from Mr. and Mrs.j George D. I.cary. Thn three- acre proprfty is on Ihc south side of Iv; tower, Dr. Ashle.y's residence, which is opposite Marine Avenue. "Sisnnylca" ex- tends to Co'gcshall Avenue on the west. It includes a five-room cottage, lo be known as Junior Lodge. Vcrnm Court leased "Shady I.awn" from Dr. and Mrs. Wolfram G. Graber. II had been used as a dormitory last year by Salve Regina College. All build- ings involved in today's an- nouncement will he used as dor- mitories. "Sunnylea" will house 46 girls and a resident head, and will contain the presidents office, now situated at Vernon Court Hall. With -these additional facilit- ies, Vernon Court will be operat- _._____________ in? 11 dormitories this fall. today for the third succes- Astronauts Rest, Stay Up At Least 46 Orbits SPACE CENTER, Houston, Tex. Gemini 5 astro- nauts, well-rested after sound sleeping periods, swept into their third day in space today and prepared to chase a phan- tom satellite across the skies, j Conrad: "Hello there, how're] In the more distant future, all the (four) boys (rendezvous is a necessary parl Both astronauts were hope of the in fine spirits after logging 10 hours sleep in Ihe second day. Medical experts had been con- cerned because each had cat- moon and back in Ihis decade. The problem of sleep for the astronauts bolhered space agen- doctors Sunday. Thc astro- Gord n RKPORT ON GKMINI 5 PROGRESS John Hodge, right, flight director of the Blue Team mission control for Gemini 5, ponders a question at the press briefing at .Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Tex., today. Other members of the overnight team are: Astro- naut Elliot jr. See, Jr., left, and Dr. Fred G. Kelly, flight surgeon. (AP Wircphoto) Jets Wreck Bridge, N. Viet Power Plant SAIGON, South Viet Namlgan marc than six months ago. pj __ Twenty-four U.S. war! All of the planes returned safe- planes pounded a hydroelectric ly from the latest strike, the plant and site in Norm Viet spokesman said. other Bellevue Avenue dormi- The spokesman said no flood- tories are Vernon Court W e.b s t e r Hall, Leroy Hall, Hall, Boleyn House, Michael F: Walsh House, Fairlawn Hall and Sen- ior Lodge. Ruggles Avenue dor; mitories.' ire Nethercliffe Hal' and Lawrence Hall, Agent for the "Sunnylea" pur 'a TJ.S. military spokes- ing was reported following eith- man said. Striking the Ban Thach plant twice, pilots said they damaged a multi-storage generator build- chasri was nery of the A. Flan- Open Sewer Onto Beach Gets Protest '...Robert E. Woodruff, director of the Norman Bird Sanctuary, said today be will appear at the Middlatown Town Council meet- ing tpnighl-lo'jsk what is being atont town's --unmet sewage disposal needs. He ,-vFifl' rlztil- aiiti insect spraying on the marshes included in the property of sanctuary. Such spraying, he has been found extremely 'detrimental to wildlife in the area. Regarding the sewage prob lem, her said in. conducting a class of 20 Girl Scout students In marine biology last week at Atlantic Beach he. found an open sewer pouring out material onto the beach within 100 feet of mothers and small children playing on-the sand and in the water. Woodruff called It "one of the most nauseating sights" he ever saw He will ask the- Coun- cil what steps are-being taken to correct tie.unhealthy condi- tion. Eight Air Force F4's, eight F104 Slaughters and four sup- port aircraft bombed lhc plant this afternoon after four other Phantoms hit it earlier in the day. Heavy damage was reported inflicted on the same larget in two raids over the weekend. The site was first bombed Sat- urday in what was described as the first dam reported struck by American planes since air er raid. In another strike, 16 Thunder- chiefs flow wilhin 31 miles of Communist China, hitting a bridge 42 miles north-northeast of Dien Bien Phu. U.S. planes penetrated to wilhin 30-miles of Ihe border on a previous raid military spokesmen have re- ported. In the ground war, the U.S. Army's 1st Division made its biggest kill so far in the Viet Nam Viet Cong guerril- las in a search and destroy op- eration last Thursday and Fri- a U.S. spokesman an- nounced. The spokesman said .the 18th strikes in North Viet Nam be-battalion of the "Big Red One" Hearn Sees Law Policy Smoothed V Rear Adm. Wildfred A. who formerly command. Navy judge advocate general, traced the most significant de- velopments in the legal special- ist field during the past year for a group of more than 125 re- serve officers this morning at the Naval Justice School. The Reservists were wel- comed by Vice Adm. Charles L. Melson, president of Ihc Na- val War College and command- er of the Naval Base, and Capt. Anthony J. Device. Justice ed the Justice School, said. He during fiscal year 1965, the also wounded three Viet Cong and captured seven in Ihe o ation northwest of Nha Trang, 200 miles northeast of Saigon. U.S. casualties were described as. light. A U.S. Marine patrol wiped out a three-man Viet Cong mor- lar team Sunday just as it was gelling ready lo launch an at- tack, a spokesman announced. He said the Leathernecks used an M79 grenade launcher in the operation 4 miles south of the Da Nang air base, 330 miles north of Saigon. A spokesmen said U.S. and Vietnamese planes flew 214 combat sorties in South Viet Nam during the 24-hour period ending at 6 a.m. Pilots reported damaging or destroying 400 buildings. Forty-eight U.S. Army heli- copters killed an estimated 38 Viet Cong 40 miles southwest of Saigon. The choppers were lift- ing Vietnamese troops into a landing zone -when they began taking'fire from guerrillas. U.S.- Marines killed three rnore Viet Cong on Van Tuong Peninsula in the aftermath of last week's big battle there. "Light to moderate" Viet Cong resistance was encountered Sat- urday by Marines clearing out tunnels, a spokesman said. The Marines said they had bodies since Charles Conrad Jr. were to be- gin pursuing the imaginary sat- ellite about 11 a.m. (EST) in a rehearsal for the Gemini 6 flight scheduled in October. By a.m. (EST) the Gem- ini 5 spacecraft had completed 31 orbits. As the astronauts moved into the 32nd orbit, the control cen- ter gave them the go-ahead to complete at least 46 of their planned 121 revolutions of Ihe earth. The 4Cth orbit could end with a splashdown in the Atlan- tic Ocean prime recovery area about 10 a.m. Tuesday. However, flight controllers were confident the spacecraft would go the full eight days ending with a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean Sunday. Success- ful completion would eclipse the Russian endurance record, of five days. Because of a spacecraft pow- er problem which caused con- iiies cernca occausc cacn naa cat- 1J uutiuio .Snapped only about two hours onfnauls got only about two hours the first day. jof sleep during their first 30 missioning program for .law specialists in tbe Naval Re- IS 111 UJC IiaTOi US had been com- serve, missioned. A second opment was the the three-day battle. Marine casualties have not been an- Roman Catholic and Protes- tant memorial services were procedure for changing the-'idd Sunday for 18 men of the officer designator to a Re- 3rd Marine Regiment's 3rd Bat- m, active duty will reporl to coun- Scliool commanding officer. The, uh t Mli as it- II Tnct i c oi-itviu o _ seminar will'last two weeks. "There are encouraging de- velopments in the Naval Re- serve law Admiral officer designator serve law tahon who died in Ihe Van was a new progra.m under Tuong fighting. Eighteen hel- ivhich Reservists releas.u imets were hung on rifles stuck in the sand in a semicircle in front of the tenl where the serv- ices were held. a part of processing. Lav; trained officers being released (Continued on Page 2} Pastor Of Integrated Church In Mississippi Shot In Back t JACKSON', Miss. (AP) A while minister aclive in civil rights activities here was shot from behind with buckshot Sun- day night as he walked into his apartment house. Jackson police said the, Rev. Donald A. Thompson, .19-year- old pastor of First Unitarian Church here, waj smbushed about p. rn. as he walked toward the rear door of apartment building the The woman who was denied Ihe vote at the Cigar Smokers' national convention last week- .end admitted Saturday night sippi Council on Human Rd'a-lwas driven by a white man her 1965 campaign failed cern early in the flight, control- tbe Soviet space program sai day The new experiment would work this way: an imaginary rocket would soar into an orbit similar lo tl'.al of the Gemini 5 capsule.'From the ground, mis- hours in flight. But, like the power trouble that kepi Ihe astronauts too flight hasn't been arranged where one guy can sleep. It's where both of us have been hav- ing to do some of the tests." Later, the mission control center scrapped one of the scheduled experiments In- volving the firing of rocket thrusters because the noise might disturb the astronaut who was sleeping. Cooper, 38, slept tnrough a busy to sleep, the problem ap- personal space flight record pearcd licked during the night. ]34 hours and 20 minutes, ex- sendlrackin'glBoth men reported extensive ceeding the time he spent in information to the capsule. TlieinaPs- astronauts, using their rocket thrusters, would try to maneu- ver into Ihe vicinity of the imag- inary rocket. Rendezvous experience is im- portant because, in the immedi- ate future, the object of Gemini 6 is to meet and dock with an Agena rocket. A shift in plans helped the astronauts doze off. Conrad, a Navy lieutenant commander, jokingly remarked at one point that he'd like to sleep more, "but you guys keep giving us something to do." Cooper, an Air Force lieuten- ant colonel, elaborated: "The !ers are committing the pilots to continue-only on a day-to-day jasis. The trouble with a balky :uel cell oxygen supply was im- proving steadily. Mrs. Conrad was in the Hous- on Control Center today during a Gemini 5 pass overhead. As- ronaut James-A. McDivitt, the capsule communicator, acted as a go-between in a brief .ex- change between husband and vlfe, who was.in. a glass-en- closed viewing room. Here's how it went: McDivitt: "Why not make' a few comments for Jane-is'iJ'here.'i orbit in a .Mercury flight. Other developments: fuel cell seemed lo get healthier as time wenl by. Oxy- gen pressure was reported to have risen to 90 pounds after t low of 62 pounds. duplicate satellite ivaj mounlcd on a tower at Cape Kennedy, Fla., and tbe Gemini 5 spacecraft turned on its radar and tracked the satelu'te's beac- on on the 17th orbit. space officials denied a Soviet claim that Gemini 5 was launched "in haste and definift risk." kink in the lines of a blood pressure measuring device on the arm of Conrad, 35, was 4 straightened out and the instru- loday a great deal remains informatiin resumed proper operation. Soviets' Space Chief Puts Off Moon Shot MOSCOW head ofjf.sl in )id" be learned before "we can talk of landing a man on the moon or a planet." Dr. Mstislav Keldysh said it is not even possible now to choose a landing site on the moon because there is insuffi- cient information. "Man is approaching inter- planetary Keldysh said, the universe and on interplane- tary travel, he said. "I am convinced that no one can fix a realistic date" for get- ting a man to the Kel- dysh added. "Maybq I am wrong." The United States has an- nounced a target for a man on the moon in 1S69. The head (.f Dr. Joseph iianeiary irayei, ,he U.S. program, Dr. Joseph 'but it would te bad rfh? said list June continued himself be earned away.-J hr, m f acted on the basis of msuffi- fhat date Io cicnt information. Keldysh, president of the Viet Academy of Sciences, p'lbred "the exaggerated inl orbits 1968, xperimental photo- graphing of Typhoon Lucy over the Philippines was called of( Sunday because an airplane couldn't lake off lo correlate the data. Cooper reported excellent pictures of the typhoon Satur- day. all of the experi- ments have been carried on-in some form. Gemini 5 spacecraft has been turned nose down so RainfattOnly Quarter Inch., More Promised On Friday Keldysh's comments came at the earths horizon is visible. ;a s confrrence on details of astronauts have reporl- d the'Soviet'space probe ed seeing Peru, Austra- ltiat 20 of the citii, Cape Kennedy moon's far side'.. (launching and East Africa. Gardeners welcomed yes- terday's soaking rain, but swimmers and tourists look a dim view of' the -soggy gray Sunday. Less than a quarter Inch of rain was registered by the Newport Water Depart- ment, not necessarily, satis- factory but still welcome. However, the rain did soak the ground, rather than just run off. Although beacherj were empty, traffic was fairly heavy. The Ocean Drive had its full complement of sight- seers and cars again were left wailing on several (rips of the Jamestown ferry. The skies cleared this morning, although showers were predicted later. The weather bureau added little "sunshine" lo the vacation seekers, with a promise of more rain Friday. Water officials, said nor- mal fall rainstorms should restore reservoirs to a safe supply. Woman Cigar Smoker 'Goofs Loses First Battle For Female Sex lions. His Uintarian church is deseg-Hhc rear seat. two othnr white men were in )ecanse shs "goofed." Miss Hosemary O'Brien of the regaled and serves as a teach-! Poliie said Thompson irunlijor said the ing center for an operation headied he had received "The question start kindergarten. .threatening telephone calls a fnr womcn not Police said he told them he'Mrs. Thompson told police he had just driven into the apart- had gotten onr, call earlier thai ment parking lot after nltending a board meeting at his church. He said he had driven a Negro member of Ihe church, Johnny Frazicr, an official of Ihe N'a- night at the church. Two years ago another civil rights leader, Mcdgar Evers, was shot and killed in this capi- tal city as he relumed to his here. Evcrs was slate Thompson, a native of Terre shot was fired al him, br. Haute, Ind., has been a pastor missed. The second shot hil him here two years. He has been vol-Jin Ihe back of the, left shoulder unteer secretary of Ihe Missis-! Thompson reported the car Party Friday At Whitehall Will Aid Restoration Fund The Whitehall Committee thai brouglil William and Ihc National Society of ColoniaPMary to lhc throne of England. Dames in Rhode Island willjHe received his early education sponsor an old-fashioned "At-in Ireland and was graduated Home in Ihe Garden" Friday from 5 lo 7 p.m. at "White- Dean Berkeley's colonial estale on Berkeley Avenue, Middlclown. Proceeds of the parly, for which Ihcre is a admis from Trimly College in Dublin. A brilliant student, he was par- ticularly interested in lhc phi- losophy of John He kept a diary and In this "Common Place Book" lie recorded his original ideas and1 observations. sion, will bo used 'for Ihe fur-JThe purpose of his early essays was lo reconcile philosophy to ihcr restoration of thn historic estate. Mrs. George W. Wheel- er, treasurer of the Whitehall Committee, has charge of dis- tribution of admission cards. Mrs. LcRoy Taylor and Miss Ruth Davenport head the com- mittee. Dean Berkeley born in Ireland of English parentage sbortly before tie Revolution of common sense. By the age of 25 he was the author of several widely read works. After fur- iher education and tr.ivel he received Ihe patent for Deanery of Londonderry Ireland in 1724. George Berkeley came t o (Continued on Page 2) be brought up. It had to lie pre- sented through the resolutions committee, which met in the morning. I forgot about lhat. I goofed. I was in the swimming pool when the committee met." Miss O'Brien said she would her battle to give voice and vote" at conventions. have some men del- 'cgatcs wlh me next year in the attractive blonde said. "This has nolhin1? to do with the boys' night out. This is a cigar smokers' or- ganization and women cigar smokers in Anrerica should be represented." Puffing away on a Urge ci- gar at the family dinner Satur- urday in the Hotel Viking, Miss O'Brien was sealed al the head al president, said the Cigar Smokers gave him more "peace of mind" than any other organ- ization to which he belonged. "This said Donaldson, "does not pit creed against creed, race against race, or nationality ng.iinsl nationality. H is a non -purpose organization A man cannot eat dinner with another man and table. Friday she was denied a good smoke with him. millance to a "men only" shore dinner. But Saturday she chatted away amiably with Bob Donald- son of the Boston Humidor, the national president. She wore a without finding some common denominator." "Men like Churchill in mo- ments of despair turned toward a good cigai for comfort and thoughtful said Strike At Gas Co. Held Up By Union The union contract with the Newport Gas Light Co., sched- uled lo .expire at midnight to- day, will be. continued on a day- to-day basis, according lo Ed- ward L. Smith, president of the local chapter of Ihe Brotherhood of Mew England1 Utility Work- rs. Negolialions between union representatives and the com- pany have been underway for several weeks. They will contin. uc at 10 a. m. Wednesday. Smith and Cornelius C. Moore, whose firm of Moore, Virgadamo Boyle i Lynch is representing the company, said oday progress is being made n the negotiations. Last Thursday, Local 336 massed a strike vote effective in about 30 days. Smith saM 'they would make every effort :o avoid such action." The reason for the strike was not announced by union of- ficials. Moore, who said he was sur- prised to learn of the s t r i k vote, said the company was pre- pared to continue the service of the utility's customers if the un- ion diil strike. "1 can't visualize a strike, however, because we do not know why the vote was taken." He said Ihe vole "will nol in- fluence us one way or another. We will continue the negotia- tions as before." Moore said there was no ill feeling or rancor among the ne- gotiators "on either the com- pany or union's part." Moore, whose firm has repre- sented Newport Gas Light Com- pany for many years, said he could remember the union tak- (Conlinucd on Page 2) green, yellow and white dress, a double strand pearl j franklyn Ashley, prcsi-! Reds 'Detain' 17 U.S. Men WASHINGTON' (AP) The'harassing families through Defense Dtiuartmenl currcnliyjagcnts in Hie UniKvl Stales, j carries 17 names on its list of] The Defense Department is i.lU.S. servicemen "detained" in unable lo say how many of the necklace, a bracelet and pin Donaldson, re elected nation- denTof Vernon Court JuniorMhe hands of the are held in Vie. Cong prison College, introduced another Uml" Xam vice president; Richard Don- ner, Newport, third vice pres- ident; Harry Paul, Bosion, scc- U, S. FIGHTERS RETURN FROM ATTACK IN VIET NAM A night of four U. S. FIDO Supcrsabre fighters return to Tan Son Nhut airport near Saigon after a combat mission over undisclosed area in South Viet Nam. These jets of Ihe 481st Tactical Fighter Squadron conduct daily strikes and close air support missions against (he Viet Cong. Air Force, source of photo, did not say when picture'was'made. (AP Wirepholo by Radio from Saigon) in South Viet N'am and Barbara Lcis, who! In any previous conflict they i how many arc, in Not'th Viet is a cigar smoker. jwoitld have been lislcd as Mrs. Lois leaches poise and.'oners of war- ho said, "so don't! anomalies of let anyone loll you thai cigar v'et -Nam ls that smoking is a dirty habit." there has been no declaration or flndmS of So "'Save boon lakeu into custody by Besides Donaldson, other na- lionnl officers elected were Wil- liam Cunningham, Washington, Missing Persons Act uas amended in 1963 lo describe a i a forrjgn Hcrr is the way the Defense Department decides Hie de- tained and missing catgoriw: A man is reported as detained hr is known definitely lo M1C.'Vnvrt M rotary; and Marvin Kaplan, Bos :on. treasurer. John Paduano. president of the Newport Humidor and loasl- master, said he held a baton instead of a gavel because Ihc was symbolized by In lhal year, as action in- a a hostile forco while apparcnlly alive and no conclusive- evidence thai he died after being captured. The report must creased and lhc number casualties among U.S. military) onfl OJ- persons wit- inc man-s capture. jijssinR _ here Iwo terms ara men designated _ "missins" and "search mounlcd. snven men becnme rcscuc." TJIO man is listed In 1964, seven (sr.ircli ami rescue) by the Reds. a hunt is still under way v.zcd this ground, air or sea. If he is The list was reduced by onejnol found, his name is trans- last month when Army Sgl. fcrrcd lo the missing list. After Isaac Camacho of El year from Ihc date on which Tex., a Special Forces man brramc missing, a legal v t ,t, A j- lured In N'ovembcr 1063, man-iboard may extend tho lime for Newport for Ihc shore dinner ,0 cscapo (hc mijs. H ciedrncst He cited Ernest ic prepared Friday nighl. Coun- cilman Henry C. Wilkinson, the acting mayor, and Matthew Faerbcr of Newport spoke. Joe Ilcrz, Thames Street Hisinessman, presented 130 ci- gar holders 1C lhc Cigar Smok- Cong. ing if (here arc reasons lo be- Thc Defense Department has iievq lie is still alivo 1ml unre- rcqucslod that Ihe names andjporlcd. Thc board can make a addresses of next of kin of miss-lfinding of "presumptive death" ing or drained men not be purposes of insurance, legal lished to prevent Ihe and survivor ticnefits. from pulling pressure on prison- ers members and male guests ers lo force disclosure of in present. Thc United still has i lotal of 389 persons unaccounltd 'formation by threatening or in the Korein   

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