Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Newport Daily News Newspaper Archive: August 18, 1951 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Newport Daily News

Location: Newport, Rhode Island

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Newport Daily News (Newspaper) - August 18, 1951, Newport, Rhode Island                                Weather Data rises sets Tides: high A. M., T. M.; low A. M.. P. M. Friday's Temperatures high 76: low 69. En.tton'.H Beach water tempera- ture at noon today, Local Forecast Fair and warmer tliis afternoon. Partly cloudy, little change in tem- perature tonight- Fair, little change In temperature Sunday. Detailed Report on Page 2 ESTABLISHED 1846 Vol. 168 NEWPORT, R. I., SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 1951 TWELVE PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS U. S. ADOPTS NEW PAY POLICY GEARED TO COST OF LIVING Stabilization Program To Be Reviewed Again i In Spring, Says Johnston j BRITISH MAY QUIT IRAN UNLESS TALKS GET QUICK RESULT Mossadegh Cabinet Meets To Draft What May Be Final Reply To Britain WASHINGTON, Aug. IS i TEHRAN, Iran, Aug. 18 The government has adopted, j Britain's chief oil negotiator said temporarily at least, a general! policy of allowing wages to rise Iranian refinery at Abaclan soon and fait with living coats, unless Iran agrees to a speedv In approving U e policy yester- settlement of' the grave oil Kichard Stokes issued his mcnt while Premier Mohammed Mossadegh's cabinet was meeting1 to draft what is expected to be its day. Kconomic; Stabilizer Johnston said It was "in line with the overall stabilization ob- jective of keeping the American economy in balance." However, .Tohnston said the whole .stabilization program would have to be reviewed next spring. He. okayed the new policy, proposed by the Wage Stabiliza- tion Board, until March 1, 1952. In the meantime, the board will approve wage increases granted by employers to offset the rise in living costs. Roughly, they have risen .11 per1 cent -since January, and about two per cent since thn Wiifi-c-price freeze oC last Jan. The new policy supplements but doe.i not change n. .separate regula- tion under which employers may grant of 10 per cent over January, levels without com- ing to the board for approval, Board ApplU-s New Policy The board promptly applied the now policy to a scries of northern cotton-rayon textile mill cases. It granted a six and one-half per cent final reply lo Britain's proposals. Stokes repeated that the offer what amounted to 30-50 control of the countrv's oil the best he could make. Me made it clear he expects a yes or no answer today or with- in the next few days. Walter .'f. Levy, oil adviser to W., AverplJ Harriman, spent two and one half hours with Mossa- degh last night discussing techm-i cal problems. Harriman, President Truman's trouble shooter, is not! pressuring Iran to accept Uie. British offer, but it is known he! fully supports it. I Iran Senate Votes- Bond Stokes said the British offer "would mean that at present I prices. the Persian (Iranian) i government would receive nearly I TRUMAN FORCES SEEK TO RESTORE PART OFAID BILL Look To Senate To Give Back Billion Slashed In Economic Help Fund Cease-Fire Buffer Zone Still Undecided As Teams Meet For Second Time N. and Communist members of the sub-committee named to try and reach agreement on a proposed buffer zone in Korea pose outside the meeting- house at Kaesor.g after their initial meeting. Left to right: Chinese Gen. Hsieh Pang-; North Korean Mai Gen. Lee Song- Cho; U. S, Maj. Gen. Henry I. Hodes, and U. S. Rear Admiral Arleigh Burke. _______ (AP via radio from Tokyo) SLAYERS OF KING PLACED ON TRIAL Two Plead Not Guilty To Murdering Abdullah three times the sum of money they have previously been receiv- ing." In 1950 the Iranians received hoost, amounting to eight and one-! f from hrtlf cents an hour to CIO textile workers, effective last March. That evened up their raises with tho.se of other New England mill workers who have contracts with cost-of-living "es- calator" provisions. These allow wage increases when the cost of living' goes decreases If nncl when the living cost declines. The board also okayed n future cs- calntor clause for the Tho board declined to approve the mil seven and one-hnlf per rent increase negotiated by the Cro-textilo workers and the! northern manufacturers, saying I Anglo-Iranian. Meanwhile, the Iranian Senate voted a Rial internal bond issue to raise money to keep the govern- ment running while oil royalties are cut off. The bonds" will mature in four years and carry six per cent interest. The Senate also voted 25 to 1 to accept a U. S. Export-import bank loan. This is not expected to help the in- ternal financial situation because most of the money Is carmarkec to buy .agricultural and highway equipment In the United States Premier Mossadegh, who hail formerly opposed the loan switched as a result of the fin- ancial crisis caused by the oil dispute with Britain, .'r> 1 3 Aff V11 i ni -ft -AS OKUI sever- ance pay to retiring .workers, also agreed upon by the employers, was held In nbeynnce while the studies nil of pension and re- tirement plans In the lig'.it of llic stabilization program, Wiv.y.K To Get I'ay Hoost T'mlcr the cost oC living may get a pay boost im Three persons, capsized in' a these three ways: skiff off Gooseberry Island this 3. If they were working under a I noon, were rescued and taken to contract with an escalator clause'fire department headquarters1 to in effect before the Jan. 25 wage) dry out, Ernest LaFontaine. 26. of East Providence, Walter Bonn, 16, and freeze. (Under such a clause, pay ncljustmentM are usually mado every three months, at the rate of One cent an hour for each rise or fall of 1.14 points in the govcrn- P.oger Mayotle. IS, both of Oak- land Beach were gathering rock- weed for the a seafood compa'ny ment price Index. A new one will i of Oakland Beach, he out next measuring! 'rhc Newport emergency truck prices as of July i and the Coast Guard were called 2, 1C the employer and union BoUl arrived after the trio hart want to gear their pay rates in the been brought ashore on the Ocean future to such an index, the board Drive by a boat from Gooseberry will approve the contract provls- Island, They were apparently no AKMAX. Jordan, Aug. IS The trial oC '10 persons charged with plotting- the July 20 assassin- ation of Jordan's King Abdullah opened at Antelby Co nip near here today before a special military court. The indictment against the men, three of whom arc relatives of Haj Amin El Husseini, exiled grand mufti (if Jerusalem, accused them of "plotting, abetting and inducing the assassination of King- Abdul- lah." Two of the accused are being tried in abstcntia, since they are living in Cairo, Abdullah, one of the most power- ful figures in the Middle East, was slain in the JordP.n-held old city oi Jerusalem as he was going to the tomb of his father in the Mosque oC Omar. His assassin, a 21-year- old Moslem tailor who was said to be a follower of the grand mufti. was killed on the spot by Abdul- lah's bodyguard. Rule For Naming Charter Officials Cited At Hearing Of Stiidy Group WASHINGTON, Aug. IS j Administration leaders to j the Senate today to restore at; least part of a cut' the House made in President Tru- man's foreign aid bill. They were particularly hopeful of recapturing an unexpected last- minute slice oi economic aid lor western Europe. U.S. SABRE JETS Joy Spells Out CLASH WITH REDS Allied Demand For Battle Line Two Enemy Planes Hit In Battles Over Korea U. S. EIGHTH ARMY HEAD- QUARTERS, Aug. IS S. and Red jets fought two thunder-; M'UNSAN, Korea. Aug. 3S (.-Pi and Reds got down to brass tacks today as the four-man armistice subcommittee met on the buffer zone issue for the second That cut was pushed 'through i'by" a I .ing- battles over northwest Korea an atmosphere of coalition of Republicans and today in the first large-scale informality. more than ,1 month. arc held strictly Fifth Air Force and no official re- Southern Democrats shortly, be- fore the bill passcc last night by a vote of 260 to 101. action U. S. The present Newport Charter Study Commission has little pow- er and the Representative Council, after receiving- its mus still follow the requirements set forth in the constitutional ar.ienj- ment. This was the opinion of, most of these speaking- at tlie charter hearing- Friday night sit the city hall attendee! by fewer than 20 people. The hearing was hold tay the study commission. Thomas D. Sliea, Jr.. president of the Newport County Junior Chamber of Commerce, suggested the commission recommend to the Council that it immediately draft, the system of nomination of com- missioners under the new EARLY ACTION SET The House com- Red filter was damaged in thej of progress was made. mittee already had looped fil'st and one was "probably Bui a pooled dispatch from Kac- off hinds for European destroyed" in the second. song s-viid tho four generals- economic help. The Air Force said all the Amcr-'two American, one North Korean ican F-S6 Sabre jets in both battles I and one seen returned safely to their bases. i huddled over a map spread Out on Twenty-eight Sabres tangled: a conference table. They pointed with 24 Russian type MIG-15's'bc-1 to it as'they talked. And they R. I. Plans Registration, Home Rule Study In Sept. The additional cut was imposed by 119 Republicans and 07 Demo- crats over the opposition of 162 Democrats, 11 Republicans and one independent. It was sponsored by Rep. Reece former I chairman of the Republican national committee. i The House left the European economic allotment at 000 instead of the requested by President Truman. Democrat Caught off Guard There were no House-voted re- ductions in other funds recom- mended by the foreign affairs committee. This group had trimmed a total of from Mr. Truman's requests Tor Ways of implementing the home twcen 15.000 and the second fight. Lt. Charles F. Loyd, Ky.. was credited with the prob-' able. In the earlier collided with 30 Red jeLs. The battle, 5.000 feet over Son- chon, lasted five minutes. The MIG's broke off the fight and ;lcw north. It Was the first large scale jet air battle since July in.' The Sabre jets, of the Fourth Fighter Interceptor Wing. were Hying- top cover for a flight of foot in sec-mod to be speaking inform- i ally, and not from prepared state- Marion, merit.--. lengthy session in hot Kaesong they ad- at After and swe 29 Sabres i Journcd. They will meet again itary and economic assistance F-80 Shooting Star jets attacking rule and poi-manunt registration I Pacific area for Europe. Greece, Turkey, Iran, ihe Near East, Africa, Asia, amendments to the state commission and "take no furthor! :j tion will be considered by the constitu- Publics alike Communism. cd and in American resistance action." He believed people. wanted to know how !n September instead crs would be nominated without! waiting until the pcti-j tions are filed. Alderman Arthur A. Carrcllas, Councilman Salvatore L. Virg-ada- mo and Roy McPoland and City Robert A. Shea were the only city officials in the audience. Dr. John H. Finn, chairman, and Councilmcn M. Osmond, Grimes find John W. Stewart, Herbert E. j General Assembly at a special of to i waiting" for the regular open in January. These amendments will be pre- sented at this time because of a The eight defendants present fo Macaulev and "jo'hn Paduano ions. 3. If employers and unions want to make long-term contracts without such a binding clause, they may open their agreements every six months, take a look at what has happened to living costs and make adjustments limited to those fUictatlons, The board would ap- prove that arrangement. worse for their immersion. DRUG DEATH PKOBE OX VERMILLION, S. D., Aug. 13 State Board of Regents of Kducatior. was in special session here today to study questions aris- ing- from deaths of two persons in n laboratory experiment at the University of South Dakota. F. B. I. Rounds Up 6 More Red Leaders Charged With Plotting Against U. S. WASHINGTON1, Aug. IS in scattered' places. Kelson, the trial were brought in unde heavy guard. Two Plead "Not Guilly' Father Ibrahim Ayyad. Roman Catholic secretary of the Latin patriarchate in Jerusalem, and Dr Mousa Abdullah E. .Husseini, one of the mufti's cousins, were the first two defendants to appear be- fore the three-man tribunal. They both pleaded "Not guilty." The prosecutor general told the court Father Ayyad had said dur- his investigation that "if Kin; Abdullah was not assassinated. I vould have murdered him myself." rather Ayyad flatly denied this as 'absolutely untrue." The prosecutor said Abdullah El Tell, one of the two being tried in .absentia, was the kingpin the conspiracy. He said the other absent one, Mousa. Ahmed J! Ayyoubi, was the liaison between El Tell and Mousa El Husseini. The assassination plot, said the prosecutor, was hatched ir. El Toll's Cairo home. were the study commission members holding- the hearing. Adelson For City Manager Although Dr. Finn, who prc- si'dcd. said the commission wanted to hear views-on chtirtcr, the two-i session early The bill's total as it went lo the Senate was On passage it had the backing of 179 Democrats, SO Republicans and one Independent and tho opposition of SI Republicans and 20 Democrats. military Jlai'gcts -when they inter- cepted the MIG's. HamJ-to-Ham] Figlitiug I-1. Buford A. Hammond of MiddJesboro, Ky.. was credited with damaging the Russian-type A. M. tomorrow (S P. M. Saturday. That indicated the four trouble-shooters did not reach a final solution today where tho cease-fire buffer., zone should be placed. TcIN Of IT. X. "Demands Vice AUm. C. Turner Joy, Se- noir Allied negotiator, released in Munsan the text of a statement he had made in one of "the fruit- less sessions of the main delega- tions. 1 The statement spelled out the N. demands for a buffer zone along the present battle lines. Joy said the tr. N. must retain desire to get charter revision com-; The cut was not missions into being as soon as j many Republicans possible and to enable boards of canvassers to complete registra- tion details. Knactment of   Wcston, Mass., Seismologica Laboratories an attendant said lit could see no signs of the shod recorded on the instruments there The priest in charge, however, was absent. The city was visited with a similar shock a few weeks ago when a sharp rumbling sent man> families to their cellars to checl on their furnaces. Friday night's shock also seemed to come from the base- ment and again people checked their cellars. Unlike the several- second rumbling of the earlier earthquake. this one rumbled slightly and ended in a distinct a blow against the house. One Middletown official's family heard the shock, describing it as "a noise and a little shaking" of the house. In this city the shock was felt in several quarters of the city. REICH WAR, END URGED WASHINGTON, Aug. is The Senate foreign relations com- mittee voted unanimously yester- day to recommend to the Senate a resolution that would "terminate the state ot war between the United1 States and Germany." The measure, already passed by the House on July 27, corr.es near- ly 10 years after Congress official- ly declared war on Germany Dec. ________________ 11. 10-n, and more than six years The Justice Department said all after the fighting stopped in May .jiven billions of American aid. are in a position to carry more, of the load themselves. Democrats countered with the claim that European economic re- covery has progressed to the point the extra money requested by the Prcaidant would put them on a or town council sound footing and help them pro- duce most of their own military supplies. House Speaker Sam Rayburn (D-Tex.) called it a bad risk to save several hundred million del- i lars at a possible cost of later should a slow down i j in European recovery tempt Russia to start an all-out war. j The bill as it cleared the House to appropria- tions allotments: i Europe: in mili-j tary aid and in economic aid, a cut of in military and in economic aid. Other Allotments Near East and Africa: 000 in military aid. no reduction. withdrew under enemy fire. In nil there were five small patrol skir- tlic Communist bid for a buffer inishes m the sector, onco the Com- 2one 3RU, parallel mums; "Iron Tnangle' bmldup i "We must ret.iin defensive po.si- he said. "We must Chinese troops attacked m the j OUJ. jvllard unli] west ,n the Yonchon sector. 3a an-1 minl KCttjcn7ont ofPthe m.lcs north of Seoul. The Reds scoms were repulsed. Thirty-one Chinese 1'ciping Hints Joy's statement was a. flat' were killed and C3 taken prisoner. On the eastern end of the line, K 1 OI-.l.t.VllJl_-lll. W H. Hi TJ. N. forces fougnt to dislodge of the policy he Reds from strongly entrenched positions northwest of Yanggu. The Allies pressed their attack into hand-to-hand combat but failed to dislodge the enemy. Patrols north of Yanggu and Inje on the eastern front reported continued harassment -from Red artillery find mortar fire, HURRICANE HITS JAMAICA MIAMI. Fla., Aug. 3S communications with Jamaica were severed by the hour hurricane which battered the British Caribbean is'.nnd during the night. Cable and radio communication with the island was still blanked, out at A. M. today. didn't say. pursued since the cease-fire talks started. The forma! talks between th.-> two five-man delegations failed, and ihe problem was turned over lo a four-man subcommittee. Thft subcommittee appeared to be mak- ing some progress. Once more the sound of laugli- tcr coming1 from the conference j room spurred hope of progress. j Pciping Radio yesterday dropped .1 hint of progress in a broadcast just before the negotiators met. The Kcd radio, monitored 1.1 Tokyo, said 'the subcommittee Thursday "look the first step I toward finding a solution to the issue deadlocking the u-uce talks." What that step was, Pciping U. N. May Use McArthur War Policies If Truce Talk Fails, Say 3 Senators WASHINGTON. Aug. IS and in ecouomic aid, a boost of for rehab ilitation of Jewish refugees. Asia and the Pacific: 000 in military aid, a cut. in economic aid a cut. and for Korean rehabilitation, a cut of American republics: n military aid and in (Continued on Page 7) W. Berlin Bolsters Guard After Tip On Red Plot j Three Senators said today if Kae- song truce talks fail the United Nations may strike the Red Chin- ese in Korea with the sort of war- fare proposed by Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Senator Taft of Ohio, Chairman of the Republican policy commit- tee, told reporters he thinks the U. N, "will have to adopt the Mac- Arthur program if the truce talks fail." MacArthur. ousted as Pacific six will be tried in Pittsburgh. 19-15. HELD IN BAIL Steve Nelson, described by the Federal Bureau of Investigation as the' top Communist in wes- tern Pennsylvania, walks down hall of Federal Building Friday night in Philadelphia on way to a preliminary hearing before U. S. Commissioner Henry P. who sent him to Moyan-.cnsing prison in default ot bail jn FBI Red roundup. He walks on crutches as the result ofi injuries received in an auto acci- dent. (AP Wirephoto) BERLIN, Aug. IS Berlin police reinforced their patrols along the border with the Soviet sector again today after re- ceiving tips that young Commun- ists at the East Berlin "peace fes- tival" intend to provoke new dis- orders. West Berlin police said they had j North and South information the Communists aimed to repeat Wednesday's border riot- ing. On that day about blue- shlrted'East Germans tried to in- vade West Berlin in a propaganda "peace march." Police stopped the marchers and this led to a battle of sticks and stones. commander by President Truman, called for the bombing of Man- churian Communist bases, a naval and economic blockade of China and use of Chinese Nationalist troops from Formosa. Senator H. Alexander Smith one of eight Republicans joining in a statement condemning MacArthur's ouster, said in an in- terview he has no doubt that the MacArthur program will be called into play immediately if it is deter- mined that the Chinese Reds won't agree to a truce. T am certainly supporting General (Matthew 13.) Ridgway's position that the fighting cannot be halted on the basis of the 38th par- I allel as the dividing line between Smith said. Without direct reference to MacArthur's proposals, Senator Russell told reporters if there is no peace, the U. N.'s warfare answer will be "vigorous against the. Red Chinese. Russell heads the combined Sen- The police received similar tips ate armed services and foreign ro- of intended violence yesterday, but lation committees which, voted 20 the day passed without incident. The Communist gathering comes to 3. close tomorrow night with an open air mass with fireworks. j to 3 yesterday to make no formal report on its words of testimony ouster. about MacArthur's be superfluous, Russell said the hearings had accomplished the end of convincing American allies that the this country will be united behind an all-out offensive if the lighting is resumed. "I am sure that if the truce talks fail, the United Nations will wage war much more vigorously than they have in the past, as a result of the sentiment the hearings have Russell said. The eight Republicans withheld publication of their views until Sunday night. Senator Bridges called their report "very strong and forthright." He said it "hits at the heart of the subject of the MacAi-thur inquiry." Other Senators said the views of the eight, which will be filed as .1 part of the committee's record, vigorously condemn the method of MacArthur's ouster, criticize tho administration's handling of Far Eastern affairs, generally back MacArthur's political views but don't specifically support his mili- tary recommendations. Bridges told a news conference yesterday the Republicans agreed they should not permit the Kae- song truce talks to interfere with an expression of their views on what he called "fundamental issues" in Far Eastern policy. Russell argued that any formal committee report now might in- terfere not only with the Kaesong negotiations but might put diffi- culties in the way of the signing of the Japanese peace treaty ,at San Francisco early next month. Senator Green (D-RI) told a reporter administration Democrats on the committee will have to what is in the Republican report before they decide whether ta answer it. There seemed littla doubt, however, that asomo Contending- that a report would answer will be forthcoming.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication