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   Wellsboro Agitator, The (Newspaper) - August 5, 1908, Wellsboro, Pennsylvania                               State Library VOL. 32, WELLSBORO, PA, WEDNESDAY, AUOTST 5, 1908. WHOLE NO: EEPUBLICA58 ORGANIZED. Bepublican County Committee Met the Courthouse Last Saturday., A meeting of the Republican Coun- ty- Committee was held In' the court' house Saturday fpr the purpose of organizing for the presidential cam- Walter Urell, of.Tioga treasurer of last year's' committee called the meet- ing to order. The treasurer's report ior the past.year -was read and accept- ed. The election of officers was then held. Charles M. Elliott, of Mans- field, 'was elected Lyman J Ayres, of Jackson tary, 'and Clinton T. Williams, of Wellsboro, Treasurer. The following letter from senator Oteo. W. Williams was Wellgboro, Pa., July 31, 1908. To the members of the 'Republican County -Committee: Gentlemen: As. my nomination on January 9th, 1907; as the Republi- can candidate for Senator In this dls- trlct was maile possible by the action of the Republican County Committee at its meeting' on the, fifth of, that month, in naming me as the Republl- canf candidate from Tioga county, -I 'lelt'that It would be proper for me to report to the Committee at its meeting to-morrow the manner in 1 have discharged the duties of the office of Senator, to 'which I subsequently elected, during the 'I9vf session of the Legislature, "but I now find it will be Impossible for me to 'be with you for this purpose, I- am called to a distant part of the state to, attend the funeral of a relative. .For the purpose of discrediting my candidacy lor renominatlon with, my friends. neighbors and party co-work- ers with whom 1 have lived and associated all my life, a special edi- tion of "a Potter county newspaper was printed, liberally paid for and circulated among them on the eve of the election wnen it was too late lor me to answer the charges It contain- ed. your consent It was my in- tention to_have answered the same -at meeting to-morrow, and to have discussed with you the weaknesses, that is as J see them, In two laws passed as reform measures at the special reform session of the Legisla- ture Jn 1906. I refer to the Corrupt Practices and Uniform" Primaries Acts. "While both were well Intend- ed when introduced and art 'in the Tight direction they are weali and tail far short, of producing the good result's expected from them, in that pne ot them makes It possible for the members of onB ''party to name tne nominees of another, and the otter one legalizes the use of an extrava- gant and unlimited amount of money to bring about Uoiulnfttionfi- and erec- tions. In my opinion, the.se laws, un- Jess amended in such a- way as will remove their defects, bring dlfi- to our state. The matters herein referred to, as well as others of interest to tne-pubr 'lie. I hope to give publicity in anoth- er way. r- Regretting, my Inability to attend. "your I remain, Yours -very 'truly., Geo. W.- Williams. The members of the committee dls- cussed the plan of jmaking the Re- LETTER FROM KOREA. To the Christian Endeavor Societies of the Welliboro Presbytery. Pyeng Yangt Korea, July 2, 1908 will b? one year the Slst.qf this month since I left my home in Mans- field, starting on the long trip for .his land and people, thep so un- known to me. Korean scenery is beautiful. There Is so much red Clay n the soil that with the rich green- ness of the pine trees, which are very common, it gives the landscape a gay appearance and the people moving about in their white garments are n perfect harmony with it all. The mountains are very high and the plains are very level. I am thankful that 1 am Sere among delightful people who are so hungry for the Gospel. They are gentle and kind, and yet with decls-. ion and'alertness when needed. As the warm weather comes on I am thankful that 1 have about finish- ed iny first year's work in studying the language, as I find it takes much more energy to study In the summer. The examinations come the latter part of next month, and 1 have only some reviewing to do. The temperature "here Is about the satne as at home, only the "heat is more penetrating so we have to careful about exposing ourselves to It. These mud-welled houses are flne, as they are so cool, I first I would not like them, but they are 'so nice and comfortable. Things are beginning to seem more natural to me, though once in a while it comes over me, all-of a sudden, that I am so far .from home and In a strange land. longer I stay here and the more I come in contact with "the people the happier I am in the thought of spending my life In this land. When Miss came to Korea In 1897, and is one of the most experienced of our Bible came in isst night and told us Jn her report about the tour thousand wom- en who have been in Bible classes this last year, and the interest they had taken in studying and the sacri- fices they nave inade to be able to at- tendx it wish I was already prepared to enter right Into the work, but J. have one consolation and that is that I am one- year nearer it than when I came out, and in two years if all goes -well, and perhaps a little be able to teach. I tbanTtful I had jwo vears 'of special training in the Bible Teachers' Training School, before coming here, for some of these older Held on July 23rd at the B. A. R. Hall in Welliboro, The annual reunion of Co. I, 45th Regt, -Pa. Vols., was held at G. A. R. iall on the 23rd ultimo, with the fol- owing members In attendance nearly all of thwn with their wives: M. C: May, 3. D. Strait, palmer B. Watklns, women are geiung "These four thous- and women are women In anaarounc the city of Pyeng Yang alone. If the whole- country were considered tne number of course would be much About half this ttumber were taught by Bible women'flpeclallx trained for tils work, and the other hall by Miss Best and the o dles ot the Station. meeting last Tuesday that toe alone IB about two thousand, or aear> ly -twice as "many as last year. So the work which had already reached large proportions is still growing rapidly and It means more for us to ls wonderful how the' working-in this little co. i. SEVERELY BU1WED, H. D. Bwrtman, J. ester Hwughton, O, English, Sly- Francis Handy, 'homas D. Marsh, R. J. Re'ynols and Charles Townsend. were also favored, with the jresenoe of Eugent Beauge and wife, of Co, O, 46th Regt.; Asa Warrlner and -iCo.JH, Reserves; Rob- ert SatterJey and wife, Co. Rs A. B. Eastman and wife of :S7th These guests did' their ull share in making the occasion en- oyable to all present. The Commissary showed conclus-, vely that .there Is no famine prevall- ng at-present as the supply for the ables would have been ample a much larger number and when the call for, dinner was heard it was )roffiptly responded to and there was M> need -of a rear guard to pick up the fcttaggjers'as all-were able and very Willing to perform their whole duty. After the meal was disposed of and some of tne Old stories rehearsed; the business meeting was held, when let- ters from absent ones were read, among- them E. Edsqn, of Indiana; John B, Emery, of Willlamspoft, Pa.; Seth D. Baxter, of Campbell, N. Y., ana slaet but not least, Mrs. Jane W. Hay- nes, of OH -City, Pa., who never fails to remember us on these occasions with, something to cheer the hearts of the boys to whose sufferings and priyatlbns sne was on many occasions a witness. She is now and has been for a long time a great sufferer from rheumatism, '-having been con- fined to her room for six months. We Are'sure'that if the prayers of the boys could prevail she would have the privilege of spending her last days fand we hope'there may.be many "of them) in peace ,and. all the comforts one can desire. The comrades were much pleased to meet and grasp the hand of Harrison B. Eastman, now lives in Bu- chanan, Michigan, -this being the first time that he has ever had the privi- lege of meeting -with as at" these an- nual gatherings; We are glad the years .set lightly upon him, as he bids fair to attend many more ol these meetings. His'remlniscences of the war we're very 'much enjoyed" by Uis old: assoeiat Mr. E, A- Inperiok Had Harrow Es- cape.from Death, Saturday. Mr. E. A. Ingerick, of this borough, was severely burned last Saturday afternoon, shortly after 4 o'clock at be Gardner cottage, on pine creek below Pour-mile Run, Mr. J. H. Gardner and Mr. Inger- ck were beating floor-filler, cotftaln- ng a large percentage of turpentine, on tbe stove in the cottage and In order to make the fire burn harder rfr. Ingerick put about a pint of kero- sene on the fire and then walked out of the room. The stove lids were off and the oil blazed up and set the filler, fire. In an instant the room was a mass of flames and smoke. Mr. Gardner seized tbe blazing pail pf filler and threw it out the door, and with a ew pallfuls .of water extinguished :he flames before any damage was done, Mr. J. A. Culver was on the porch mixing paint and saw the blazing bucket shoot out the door directly toward Mr. Ingerick. He shouted and Mr- Ingerick dodged, but not quick enough, for the blazing mix- ture struck him on the right side and nstantly his clothing was all ablaze. Ingerick started to run towards the house and Mr. Culver, at the same time, rushed into the cottage and shouted for blankets. He seized one and Misses Elizabeth Gardner and Elizabeth Rlberolle also rushed out with bed clothes to Mr. Ingerick, More quickly 'than it takes to- tell it, Mr, -Culver and the young wom- en reached Mr. Ingerick and smoth- ered the flames, and it is a miracle that their clothes did not Catch on fire. The presence of mind, prompt action and bravery of_ these people saved Mr. Ingerlcfc from a horrible death. As it was, was very se- verely burned, his right side, legs and arms being completely covered with blisters. His face escaped the flames, and lortunately he did not In- hale any of tlte fire. Vedder was summoned by tele- phone, went to the scene as soon, as possible and dressed .Mr. Ingericks' injuries. _______. It was hereafter the reunions of Co. 1 be held at the R. hall and the date for the next one mm be Sept. 17tb, 1809. the an-. niversary of the battle of Antletam. S. Houghton, Secrejary. convention in Wednesday ..and." Thursday, August 12th and 13th- .It will be "the'big- gest event of the held in "publican Club of this county more do and the need 'of more mlssionariei of -a real organization, than it has to be able to look after the work. 1 been heretofore, and affifliatlng it with the Pennsylvania Republican League. country of-Korea- The members of tbe committee who it was God's plan, to were present were: Peter S. Johnson, i evangelize the country, and It win of Henderson, of. Lan- not take many years to do-it at tae drus; J. H. Metcalf. of Brookfield; present rate of progress. The fteopje J. R. Sampson, of Charleston-, John already are so enthtosiastic In tire this section of the country.- On Wednesday afternoon there will be a baseball Wellsboro, and Arnoi In the' evening by lAWEEHCETULE LOCALS. What Has Been Doing in That Bor- ough the Past Week. Lawrencevllle, Aug. 3 0. B: Jlancbard and brother, Charles Hanchafd, of Nelson, were In town Monday evening. A. -T. Porter one day recently aught 31 large black bass in the Tlo- a and Cowanesque rivers. A. J. leep caugh 13 bass which weighed 4 pounds. Miss Dorothy Hutchlnson Is camp- ng at Mountain Lake with her un- le and aunt, jProf. aad H. J. Norman, of Mansfield. Miss Mida Smith went to Vermont Wednesday to spend some time with riends. The V7. C. T. p. 'met with Mrs, Fred Fletcher-Friday, elected of- icers fdr the ensuing year. ITEMS FROM ABBOT. Death of Mr. John of an -Arnot, Aug. James, aged 55 years, died last "Friday after a lingering illness from miners' asthma The funeral; was held on Thursday thp rpmnlTig being faVpn in the Ode Fellows' eeme'teryat Blossburg, where interment was- made. Rev, Mr James, of the Congregational church, officiated. Mr. James was a member of Local Union, ti. M.. W. oi A., a member of Arbon Lodge, L O. O. Fv of.'Blossburg, and a charter member of Arnot Looge, No. ot game between and a concert Wellsborough's E. Browne, of Covington; T, 3. Pur- pie, of Academy Corners; E. J. Tut- tie, of North Belmar; Chas. Orr, of study of God's word, and have such strong faith that they are In just the right condition for the Holv- Spir- C7 _ j _ .__t__ A Delmar; J. Tf. Buckhee, of'Elk- work upon them In power. And Sand; B. Dutcher, of Gaitfes; Fred, f when I see them taking the Bible so }f8. Husted, of Morris'Run; Lyraan J. j simply and believing every word of Ayres, of JaCkson W. H, it just as U Is, and showing such a Milo, of Knoxviller WilJarA Mid- beautiful childlike faith in .God, I daugh, of Lawfenceville; F. B. Mil- ler, "of Liberty; C. M. Elliott, of feel as though'we in America who have always enjoyed the blessing of Mansfield; P. E: Brown, of Crooked- I this Christianity do not realize what Thnpipsnn nf Morris a ,wn thing It is. and do not j-MllitaryBahd. The Association will bold their annual banquet In the ev- ening. Thursday morning at 11 o'clock the big take" place, with 50- companies, of firemen In uniform and 25 bands. At o'clock there wni.be a ball game between Coring and Galeton and in the afternoon at the winning teams of the two previous games-will-contest-for the prize. At 1 p. m..'the races and other sports will "be' held on Main street. Following are the events; hub race, hose race, hook and ladder race, prize band contest, foot races, aad t w. did fb.fr -iUfanf soiiS dfj jjte. aid -Mrs George Austin died on Friday morn Ings of scarlet fever.. 'The funera -was held on Sunday r interment a-i Ogdensburg. Amy Sandstrom, of Elmira, i spending her vacation with her moth er here. Charles Hahns "spent his vacation at WJnburne last week. The social a.tr the Congregagona church last Saturday night was'well patronized. A iandkerchief social was held a the Y. M. C. A. rooms Monday nigh for the benefit of Christ Episcopa .church. 'Our basebaJl team was in.Sayjr last week, .and crossed bats with tb Sayreites who scored over the visit ors 7 .to 6. The Swedish Military Cornet ban will go to Blossburg next Saturda evening at the Invitation of the Bap- tist church who hold a social. They have also an engagement on August 13th at Wellsboro to accompany the ASAPH HAPPENINGS, Miss Etta Shaffner, niece of Mrs. Richard Baggett, left Wednesday to pend a few days at Mt. Gretna, be- ore returning to her home in Harris- jurg. A traveling art gallery Is station- id on COwanesque street. The Potter County Gas. Co. are put- ing in a great many new meters at this-place, A band of gypsies camped-near the own hall last Thursday. This Is the bird band wnlch 'have passed .hrough this place within a short :ime. Mrs. John Bostwick entertained several little girls- Friday afternoon n "honor of oer daughter Louise's fifth: birthday.. Mrs. Simon Powers, ot Corning, wife of ex-Sheriff Powers' of this county, is spending several weeks with Mrs. Charles Cleveland. Miss Clara Hilboldt, of Wellsboro, visited friends in town last week. Miss Fay Lewis, of Lestershlre, N. Y., Is the guest of Miss Marion Guile. Miss Rose Quill, of Corning, is vis- iting her brother. Jeremiah, Quill. Floyd Harris, of Rochester, is spending his vacation Witt his par- ents, Mr. auditors. George E. Harris. Misses Elsie and Laura Seaward, of Sayre, are guests of their cous- in, Mrs. E. BfStage. Misses Carrie Howard, and Fannie Lundgren, teachers in the M. E. Sun- day School, gave their pupils a picnic Friday. Calkins, of Addison, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. George Labar. Prof. Oden C. Gortner, the Mans- field Normal Sebool faculty, called on friends In this place to-day: Personal Notes and Other Items from Down Harsh Creek. Asaph, Aug. Mrs." Liberty Mar- flwette wishes to thank the people of this place, through the Colums of this paper for their kindness to her during her recent sorrow and bereavement, in the loss of her husband. Mr. Grant Wilson, of Stonyfork, was here on "Monday. Mrs. Grace .Marvin and two sons, of Corning, and Mrs. Sadie Avery, and daughter, Elizabeth, of Wellsboro, were visiting Mrs. Bel J.Frank one day last week. J. M. Smith was home 'from_ Lee- tonla over Sunday. William Chaffee, -who is working at Lyman Run, spent Sunday and Monday with his family itf this place. T. T. Heea, of Wellsboro, transact- ed business here on Thursday. Mrs. Maude Baker and Pearl Tut- tie were shopping in Wellsboro on Tuesday last. Mlaa Alma Hamilton, of York, and Helen -Hamilton, of -fialeton, were guests on Saturday of Mrs. Locady Mr. and- Mre. I. G. Stone, -of Wells- boro, were here on Monday. Mrs. Samuel Wilson and son, Hugh, are spending a with friends at Stonyfork. Mr. and Mrs. Ransom W. Bailey, Of Wellsboro, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs, Ward Bastian, of Waterbury, Conn., and Julius Bailey, of Elmira, Mrs. Frank' Pagan, of Wellsboro, and Kathryn Ba-iley. of Wellsboro, and Mr. Benjamin Linn, of Rochester, N. Y., enjoyed a day's outing on Asaph run Thursday, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Hoadley and Happenings of General Interest in This County. E. L. Kingsbury has gone to Jamison City to spend some time. Odd Fellows of Tioga coun- ty will nold their annual picnic, at Lawrenceville on Friday, August 28th, playing ball tbe other day Leon Estep, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dav- id Estep. of Blossburg, fell and dis- located his left elbow'. H, DaWson, of Roundtop, last week completed the interior decorat- 'ing aad the'outside painting on the houses at the Redfleld farms near Nelson. He has the contract for dec- orating the interior of the Baptist church at Keeneyville which was commenced-.this week. John James, aged about 53 years, died at bis home in Arnot last week Tuesday morning. He was a son of the late Mr." and Mrs. Joseph Jaffles, for many years residents ot Fall Brook. He was born in Eng- land and is survived .by two brothers and Joseph James. The funeral was held on Thursday after- noon, the Knights of Pythias, of which order the deceased was a mem- ber, having charge of the services; burial In the Odd Fellows' cemetery, in Blossburg. .B. Holliday, of Holliday, Tio- ga county, Pa., has been visiting the past three weeks with his son, J. G. Holliday, at No. 207 Brand street, in Elmira, Mr. Holliday   of decency. A square deal be more creditable than tbe unjust restriction imposed in some localities to gratify the and pre- judice of a few old fogies who fight everything not In accord with their own narrow views of Keeker's Elmira School. We pleasure In calling the at- tention of our to the busi- ness curd of Elmira School of Commerce In this lame. We can any young man or woman school one ot the inoct up-to- date New York state, and M irach plwuwd to recommend lit to these of oor wekinc a Commercial edveattoi. both fefct. A dsUftBtsr Mr. and Mrs. William Mack on ttie same day. A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Croff on July 27th. Mr. and Mrs. Ht-rman Keener, of Draper, have been visiting friends in place. Mnttle Llnder, who been working M Boltman. Is home again. Little Raymond Slocum well sup- plied with and He 15 and 13 and with and the grand total 50. Superintendent Anton Hardt of the Wellsboro Water Company us to publish the following: "This Is-to certify that after the heavy thunfferstortn on -the afternoon of Tuesday, July 21st, 1908, 1 exam- ined the water coming in through the feed pipe and foutid it clear. Up .to midnight. On Wednesday, July 22nd, at 3 a. m., 1 examined the wa- ter again and found It rlly, turned it into small reservoir a.nd supplied the town from large reservoir. At 10 a. m. July 22ad, I looked at the water again, found it clear and" turn- ed back into the large reservoir. "At 6 a. in. July 25th, after the heavy storm" the night before, 1 look- ed at the water coming 'in and found It a little cloudy, turned It into small reservoir and" supplied town from large reservoir. Hosea Kennedy, Watchman for Wellsboro Water Co. "Tioga; Sworn and sub- scribed before me this 4th day- of August, 1908. O. H. Davis, J. P. My commission expires May 3, 1909." Fire Yesterday Morning. Yesterday morning about o'- clock Mr. Peter Flschler's barn on Eberenz street caught fire from an unknown cause and in a few min- utes the whole upper story was con- sumed. The Fire Department bad a Jong, run, up grade all the way, but they arrived on the scene in quick time considering the distance and had the fire under control in less than five minutes. It is supposed that the fire caused by -the spontaneous combus- tion of damp hay. which was put Into the barn last week. Mr. Flftchler had 1100 Insurance on, the building, which Will cover about half the damage. Picnic and Reunion. the marriage at Lebanon last Friday of John W. Berkheimer. of Ni- agara, N. D.. aad MiM Elenora B. Seltter. daughter of Samuel Seltter, a pretty romance was culminated, fntll Berfcbeimer. who is engaged in at Niagara, went there a ago to claim Mis Seltter for bride, tfeey had not each oth- er. Everything mad arraaccd by corrMpoBdeBce, aid their fnt proved a happy OM to hcth. trye, aged nearly 80 years, a lifelong of Jackson, died at his home at Alder Run Thursday, after a long illness. The funeral was held from the West Jackson church on Friday- Deceased Is survived by his wife and several brothers. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hudson and son. -of SoutKport, X. Y., are visiting at W, H. Hudson's. "The East Lawrence Sunday School will pienic in Carey's grove Tuesday, Aug. llth. The Grange Band will furnish tbe music. The Stewart family -reunion will be held at Grove" Park, Elmira, on Thursday. Aug. 6th. Miss E. E. Satterlee has returned from a two weeks' outing at Clifton Springs. Miss Winifred Tobey, Of Caton, Y., is visiting at the home of bvr "aunt; Mrs. W. H. Hudson. Henry Hudson spent Saturday and Sunday at Elmira and Watkins Glen. J. E. Sedlinger is very sick with j blood poisoning caused by running i a nail Into his foot. Boys Shot tnm Aubnih. Frank Johnftoa, aged 16, and Fred McNeil, aged U, both of Catlin, N. Y., were fired upon from ambush near Hornby Sunday night. Johnson was ftcrlouftly hurt and was taken to toe Corning hospital. He uncou- irlous nearly all Sunday alcat from gun wounds on the right and face. McNeil WM aim hit by the tfcot. There it M for the who HTM Mighborhod It Three Barns Bnrned. During severe electrical storm last evening lightning struck three baras in Charleston township and, i completely destroyed them. j The horse barn on the William I Rogers farm at Welsh Settlement was "I destroyed, with its contents, includ- i ing 15 tons of hay. considerable J grain, tools and farming Imploments. One 'valuable Was killed. Mr. I Rogers had aomc Insurance In the Grange. The hay barn, horse barn, silo, tool house and BhPds on the Charles Scott i farm, near Cherrj'flats were burned 'about 11 o'clock last night, with their entire consisting of a large quantity of hay. grain, tools. wairons, etc. Mr. Scott had some insurance, reported to ,be which will cover only %jpan of the loss. Elmira Defeated Yesterday. Yesterday afternoon at Athletic Park Fort Pitt of PlttAburg got even with the Empire Bridge team, of Eltnlra. who defeat- ed them Monday, by the score of 5 to 3 The game interesting and well-played n both up to the fifth, Clnlra went "up in the air." Miss -Marlon' ana tier uroiu- er, Lawrence, visited their .grand- Misses Sara and' Agnes Brimmer are visiting friends In Geneva, N. Y. i Miss Sara Tuttle, of Wellsboro, Is the guest of Miss Anna Tubbs. Miss Frances Sharp, of Woodhull, called on friends In town last week. Mr. Robert Bonhara is 111 with ty- phoid fever. Earl Peters. Matin .Tamos and Mrs. i J. JE. Peters spent Sunday evening at 1 the home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bos- worth. Fire, Five hundred persons are-dead ten- thousand homeless, and loss Is already tb> fruits of a huge forest fire raging through East Koo- tenay. British Columbia.. The flames are sweeping mountain and valley n rpglon ot-.onp. hundred .miles' square Fefnle. B. C., has been wip- ed out Wth a .loss of 74 Ijves and. Michel, with 1.750 people, fourteen miles away, waJi at least accounts In the center of a raging furnace which may kill every one of Its people. Hosmen Sparwood and Olson with a total population of 1.675 are also menaced by the flames and will most certainly be destroj-ed. From -every point death, and ruin are pouring. In. At Camp N'o. 4 of the Elk River Lumber Company, sixty-one men and two women have been burned to death and throughout the whole of the fire swept region scores of isolated have bean wiped out. How many have been lost will not be known in as the whole coun- try one mighty furnace, with 1s fleeing, and shel- terleM. to the bald mountain tops to escape tbe seas of fire which rage be- low, Bitten by a Dog. A. J. Smith, of Bath, X. Y.. was bitten by dog Sunday after- noon. She was In the doryard when- she noticed a dog running down the street on the opposite side. When 
                            

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