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Wellsboro Agitator: Wednesday, June 17, 1896 - Page 1

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   Wellsboro Agitator, The (Newspaper) - June 17, 1896, Wellsboro, Pennsylvania                               v r E C. Caswell. of Brockpori N was terribly afflicted Vrttil c-wfula and had lost all hope rf S nml. A fnemLadvised me to take Dr. TaYicienner's whu-h I did with jrreat benefit, and I rec- ommend it to others. It restores the lnvr to a lifalthy condition, and cores scrofula, rheumatism dvS .iml .ill kidney, bladder and'orin Hn __ no greater charm mplexion, snob aa heard extolline AND ENDS. m.M? OF I-.TKHE.ST SKLECTED AND COM TRIBUTES It b.i? fr. cjnently remarked ulilor of the Splketown Bliz- .iir-1 tha ne look like the Emperor of Uennsm This simply Koee to show that the Ei' peror of (Jennany looks like When i hii Iren a cathartic eivo 1'ilU. They ate safe, sweet, and I find the Majah. that some rhirvm "iimkt-e invented a f.r nr.k-.ii Imltab hnlf wateh." By si'l' the Colonel, with much tth.it wont they be putting th it -'ulf i.t.i Ah T. 111. then -h Tilt- nil lmH 11 I il-im ilphllr The i t ,n who always complaining "You i'- k .1- if hail that tirnd feeling r.m.rk d the x.fiii't. ins friend. "Ihaye. Au.l t U :ne punctured." i >-i- h at all times to ii'. th. o.uili.it- of vonr family. n of them tatch a cold or i' "ii- in Hyer Howd Vi. -I- A .f-J. M. .1. Smith, I- lit-, ind set a trial i. !he {treat German i. We it away to prove i it_ I. ,i -ure t-nre for coughs, .1 i i n-mnptun and all dis- i" ti 'iir.it anil Large nW i ut- Jpnl KMan-rut- An Ora'or In i the police magistrate, lo-ny before I u '.I- y iu.' i I H l.ntered, hlear-eyed pi.-u. iM-i -.u, ,ur- tunr hadgrown -I." i-> in. -inie their Ust coat i i H 'v p..i I applied, slow- amlTo-e to his feet. it you please with he said. "I was .-a- disorderly. There Bat if I 1.1. u, I_TO uiak- a few .'V- wme of the reasons r, tlie free ,md unlimited '-rh.i it the r.itioof 1G to t i Tin. r-" ha-tiiy polled him f IM 4 i-L .I tl I u L.M i i-r tt..it IT i- to gather t _T r t! -lj while barriissed with a i It a c- niplHiut that if- ami of the Vi it i- t-asily removed. A r IH, ,.t Halt-'s Hoiie-y of Hore- 1 ii.il I ir T- Williams, M. D., Mi AND SURGEON, Wollaboro, Pa, nt- IA Main street, second floorvover t 1 r I st TO SjxK-ial attention given i i-.- of the eye, ear. nose and throat, Dr. Willard G. Lent. vl ATTKNTION given to obflfeSrics, if women and Reneral Hnrjrery Ot- H block, Wellsboro, formerly -.1 hv Dr Haph Office hours, ,i in 1 to U p m 7 to 9 p. ,T. P. l-onjrwell, t VTHK' PHYSICIAN and SURGEON P.I. Office over Brydon's Htoro Residence corner of Pearl and is U, 1895. B. M. AT LAW AND SOLTOITOR OP >H AND PATENTS, Wellsboro. Pa., IS D G Wellsboro office in I'lii-Jc. corner Main and Crafton ihinstpn office. No. 507, B street. W J. H. Putna HKTFKSTll j WE HAVE NO AGENTS. raatnL IOO Styl ri.ecn. 90 of i st Idles. ELEHABT _ 111, ATTORNEY AT LAW, TtoRa, Pa. Collertione m t am- wbi-re in the United States. Money t, .an mi real 0, L. Bacon, M. D., IAS AND SURGEON, Wellsboro, Pa. i- at residence on Main street. Office 1] rt uutll 'la m 1 to p. m.; special at- tojAronir diseases of women i ill j-kni dlieafles 1, 1800. w MKKHICK. ROB'T K YOUNG. Derrick Young, "AT T j'lVEYS AT '.AW ANO BOLICITOBSOF vfrrVTs Wcllshoro, Pa. Office in Law H il hni; thy ground floor, Main ii i iM-ir, 7f. Sliattiicki AiToKVEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW. Pa Office up stairs, 17 Central a -iiif Jair I, H. L. Baldwin, AT'iRVKY AT LAW, TioRa, Pa. Office in klj tm Geneva, Dresden. 7 25 11-00 8 10 12 40 7 20 7 68 8 20 6 42 8 07 8 17 8 37 8-10 12 07 8 65 Watkins OM 104 0 25 Lawrenceville. 40 W 25 5 10 8 12 11 02 5 43 11 35 8 17 U 52 Elkland Knoxvffle T Tlyaacft Siopa.- ___ Stokesdale Junction Wellsboro ---Ansonla. 12 50 7 35 8 27 11 19 5 58 8 55 U G 85 0 10 12 05 6 35 8 40 11 35 0 40 0 17 IS 13 7 20 9 58 1 05 S 04 10 22 1 8 20 11 22 2 30 9 32 12 05 3 20 10 10 P. M P. V. P. Slate Jersey Shore t Wluiamsport Heading, Philadelphia 13 8 30 5 05 5 Oil 10 12 7 12 P. M P. M. A.   npjlhor on his arm. pursued during his four yoars of occn. Tlie.mxt tram would carry him to paticy of tho gubernatorial chair was limbu-, win re his wife awaited his I IT' HON. WILLIAM M'KINLEY. Cameron, i iRN'F.Y AT LAW. Wellsboro, Pa. Office t iint-nm Packer's stone 1, port with Philadelphia Eeadtai; K. K E- B' G. .ffenerffj Suptvintend nt. Addison and Pennsjlianja Railway. The-Searchlight Turned "on His Career. OOKO dOCTH. I I 1 001.VO BOKTH. BUSINESS CAffDS. Gerkj-n, Ml H' HA XT TAILOR. Wi-llstoro. Pa F{ P Erwm Fine custom tailoring at 11 r i'ni-cn fltiod fits jniaranteod in every case. ]i AOITATOK office 14, 18IJ5. Brothers Co., WI--.rHKl.il 5IARBLE WORKS The latest' ii .if fi.reieii and domestic' marble and ui tml Ohio and bmlding stone. lnl> a TO p. m !a m 7 2Ti o 10 55 7K .-i.-W'llOS 7 .vi, 7 .VI 1 1 tJ4 OOllll.tl 8a' liO.1 1138 S3.-. Addison allO 13 43 Preemnns Nichols Nelson Elkland Osoeola lOOO 431 422 047 41 (MO 4 00' X. 4 Oil 2 SI :HM Coles Hotel, 027 .137 214 84-, 114D Knoivillo 024354210 H 11 24 12 00 !1 1.1 3 820 Westflefd !l 10 3 II .IS (1 40 1" 17 Salitasv-ille 8 S4 3 (l.-.l 1227 Davis 840 3121241 10211 70J1241 Galmw 82.-, SOO.lf'oO Galuton d 8 10 FRANK M. BAKKR, G, It V.'ILS among such people and ot them that McKinloy was born, a1 Nilcs, idi Tntmbull county, O., Jan. A younger sou, he was destined by his father, after whom lie was named, for the bar, and was educated at tho WHAT PPVT-ST scllools' later entered Alle- WH_ai lib KAlb ghanyColluKoatMeadnlle, Pa.Reaching scliool to pay his tuition lees. Scarcely was he matriculated when, the civil war came on. He was but stripling of 19 when ho entered as a private. His Private Character and Pub- lic Services, 3 43 1 50 337 r.'iO ml Ancestry and a Soldier and a His Early Participation 'In Cani paignft Hla Political MoKinl'-y, ns tho'.e who remember him us a buy m declare, was a real full of fun! loving athletic H.I.-RORO. W R Col.KS, Proprietor i unrl hotel in town i.ini: ins.steam heiit. "Iwtric lights 1! Ih l.it.-st imnn.vi.mi.'ntH Nor I'l IS Tho Buffalo and Snsquelianna Railroad. Took effect Mondnr, January 1, 1H9IJ Snsquehanna Division. Republican Career Conn Problem. ctlon With the Labor WESTWARD, a KuiitioR ]arr Costoiio Fnrk June Qernutnia Galeton ..Ar 8 2 UO ih ll :m 4 44- 11 liO 4 Two i oaK of (rood paint will look bet- ter anil la-t lonjter than three coats of poorjiaii.t It will be time to paint, Keating ami ire wunt to talk with you about punt-, brn-hef, ani oils. are not paint awjiy or helliiig it at cost S. 1 2 4 1 -6 a. m p m- p. m Dop 9 l.j 235 bnt we are selling paint that is good jumt, that will he a profit to us aud to tnt man who boys it. tONGM-N MARTINEZ -V PUTT Paints in- the beRt iii the market. We know wm-iHof we Bpeak, having handled these ".K for over fourteen years. We have 1 of these paints of all shades u '1 colors and ure prepared to sell them with tht- folio wing guarantee; r- int. r -M.LMKK OF PL-HE PREPARED lm.1.1 uji that is not aatiHfaotorilypainted l ir J'un- Pn-iiart-d Paint or upon which i- mil lt-M than if other paint hatJ n-( rl WILL BE REPAINTED AT OUR I KII iraiitw of satisfactory result, assure M hv-h.-si dt'tnw of i-scell-nco in thc (In -n twntk in- mil is an ajcrtfinent which weauthor- dw.tlcr who-hiia thf Rale of our paints i II tii uwo for such piirjiosw the funds 1 In luis K'lorifnntr to our Hrm. LONUMAX i; 5IAKTINEZ. 10 :i :io] Cross Fork June., la 18 4 GuruJama 1 1 10 5 53' Guleton l 20 G 03 l Oenesee Division. WESTWARD. 51 53 5. .p m p Wellsviile OfiMweo C P A June. 7 Ar ti oo :t rr. o :i LM Oaittos Anpouia Ar 12 ao) 7 00 i 40 Wt'llsvillo Dpp il "0 4 l.i Oetitisoe. i) 4 C P. A June 10 H4 r, 10J 20, G 13 83T, Gainea Il .Tl JIT) ti -IH 2 Auwjnia. -Ar 11 58) 7 OOJ 0 10 ii :J5 Fort Branch. 33 i 4 (HI H OOlCr'saFkJ'n 12 TO1 .1 40. :JO 7 30, .Ablnitt i 1 00 0 10 '100 7 OO'J Cr'saF k a 130 IHO t Trains atop, for mt-als. All traius ran daily except Sunday C. W OOCIDYEAR, Qcn'l Manager., H Train Miwter William McKinloy, whoso narno nnd pprsouality jnst now dominate nil things Republic-mi, hold! tha front cra- ter of the public; stupe. Ho is probably more talked nbont today than any other American and to hold that position for sireral mouths. Under tho full glare of publicity hu stands unflinch- ingly whilo the searchlight is turned steadily upnn him. It is a No detail of hiq whole career, no phaso of ilia character, no act or word Of deed, however shrouded by years, is left un disclosed. And what does the light reveal An ancestry of honest, sturdy, hardworking folks, poor aud in hnnible circumstances, but of such sort that no man in this democratic country need ho ashamed. A boyhood spent aniring simple but pure minded iu industry and in an honest emleavor to rise. A young manhood devoted to gallantly flghtinR tor the Union, and later, when peace had oome ana the sword was put away, to 14 the pursuit of, an honored profession. Tho details of his later career in coii- eress, where for years ho represented his state faithfully and with muc-h personal were widely known be-. fore. His later services to the greatcom-, momvealth of whirli ho became AS A 111II.VLT MAJOR. sports, fond of horses and fishing, and all outdoor ex-rcise, and yet at 1C ve find him taking upon him- self a us view of l.fe. The ehuich records show that in 1M8, whin he was oraroof such recent date that they need hardly 1C, he united with tho Metlio- hurdly to bo mentioned iu Humming up dist Episcopal chinch of'Poland, tho the events of his life. minister of which was Rtv. Dr. Day, As a mere boy he was a good school- whoso son, Wilson M. Day, is now pres- teaehcr. idcutof tho Cleveland chamber of corn- Tliere uro official records to show that BROOKLYN WHITE ALWAYS IN STOCK. I'KiN contracting for i tin allow any paint to IM? M '-r for you. Always speci- 't wish used. T 'ft BRUSHES. i are without Eumber in style I fin Kb nowadays. We have every frinn tlie common o-cent ones up to the skilled painters select, worth a ii n -oiuetimes more. We can surely thmir by you in brushes. WILLIAM ROBERTS. i (10 this time On I shall nvnmv.u business on a STRICTLY he was a good soldier. As a lawyer ho did credit to the pro- fession. As a statesman ho mado n most bril- liant record, which, although in tho heat cf a political campaign may be criticised by his opponents will un- doubtedly stand tho test time. As for integrity of character, there is no blot ou tho McKiuley escutcheon. His efWliujj honesty was demonstrated and tested in the fife of financial disas- ter. Few public men have had to passJ through this ordeal, and uouo of those who did came out of it more honorably than William McKmlr-y. His patriotism is tho strongest point iu his character. Whether an a sol- inerco, Majpr McKinley's father was an iron manufacturer, and a pioneer in thajt business. William was his third son. The eldest, David, is now a resident of San Francisco, where ho is thn Hawai- ian coUsul general to the United States. The second son, James, died abouVfour years ago. Theru is another son, Abner, younger, than the major, who, although a citizen of Canton, spends most of his time in New York, where ho is engaged in business. J McKinley's mother is now 87 of age, but alert and vigorous, mentally and pliysica-lly. She set H much of her distinguished son, and he waits on her and walks with her each day he spends iu Canton. Even now, whilo his .anxi- eties are and should on keenest edge, playing, as ho u bold game for the biggest i stake on earth, ho visits and dier, fighting for his country, or as a GASH basis. I believe a nim- to servo it, as'a gov- i .-I cruor directing the fortunes of a great iBIUKI- 011 eann, no visits and Die Sixpence IS better than a state, or as a statesman molding the walks with hit niorhcr every afternoon, slow dollar Hence I aitl of tlic nation, ho has been first They prefer tho quiet streets of the sub- "4 aud foremost an American, aud all his lOrCCQ tO adopt thlS plan Ol pridohas- been centered in that name. Onstomprs -kill find Not thc of with Customers will tind whoin Iui hiw mcommou> We for plumb- it to their adVallfage to trade ahvay-j exccptiug Abraham Lincoln, with mc, for my goods and Will SPCak for them- 'Pfauco hud in it so much expression of his love of tho laud, as McKinley. All- 4 yoira in the army, his congress and his 4 years HECTORS and CARPENTERS, ATTENTION! 1 '-if fin dime from Merchant r ,v, or any cf the i r xnidfH nf rnohDK tin, call mil ALL WORK GUARANTEED. II PI.OMBISOand TIN-WORK XfKNIbHED FEEE. S. Selves. throngh his All kinds of produce taken 14 '7eara m tho gubomiitorial chair ho lias been goods at WKLLSBOBO, PA. I. Butt's hardware store. in exchange for market prices. The Baking department will continue to be headquar- ters for family supplies. ..I Jl _ Weliatoro. Pa July 24, 1893. unswerving m his Americanism. Sach 13 tho inuii who is now an honest candi- date for thc presidency. a e ion 01 ;s, JOHN oughly Macbioo Shop unviit is prepared to of In M'KINLEY'S BOYHOOD. He Was a Beat Boy, Yet Studious and of KflHelann Bent. William MeKiuley isBprung from that domiuuut race that has furnished this nation with some of its greatest soldiers and statesmen. He is Scotch-Irish by descent, aud his ancestors immigrated to this country early enough to have sons who took a patriotic part iu tho war of tJio Revolution. Tho family removed from Pennsyl- vania to Ohio in 1814, and from that day have been identified with that state, Full, Cinaritnlcrd. "fli. mill ime HxlO both nowly ifilt-r ,A mrhoa in diumetor by vMlfi hixtj hix flues tofttaa WU1 bo sold i MP.in KixxliuH.iirHy. I'.i Mari-h -ij, ly. W. D. VAN HORN. President. 1 F. Kjl WIUGUT, Vice-PreBldent. (l B. W. OLECKLEI1, Cmhlcr. N BOABD or DiitBcrottB. B. JULES, F. K. WRIGHT, CHARLES TUBB8, JESSE LOCKK. D L. DEANB, E. K BACKER. N F. WILLIAM O'CONNOR, F. W. GRAVES. -ARTHUR H. ELLIOTT, r. Simd yonr boelnm! to Tba Welhoornngb Nft tlonsl." Yoa will flud it profflpt, atcunito. and acconHDodmlnc INTBKSbT PAID OS TIME DEPOSITS. J. K. HOBIKHOH, Pres't. H. C. Cox, Umbr OF WKLL8BOBO, PA. ESTABIJSHMJ, 1884, CAPITAL STOCK, SURPLUS, This Bank pUoee fSOO.OOO between its de oodtors and any possible loss. TUB dank a general banking OOBI- anfe. makea oollecttons, aolla drafts on Europe and gives prompt attention to all botdnflee at lowest rates. Interesti .ana. JI'KIKLEY. not in a great pnbliq way, but simply as anil devoted citizens, not striving for particular eminence, bnt notable for sturdincss of character and integrity. urbs for these little excursions, and McKiiUcy may bo tho old lady with tho profoundest and" nffoctiou, whilo thc conversationul in- terchange between tho two never "flags. M'KINLEV, THE SOLDIER. How He Roso From tho Ranks and Be- dune a Itrevct Mijor. Youug had been a keen ob- servor, BO f.ir as his ppporhmities went, of tho pobticjil events that culminated in the firing on Fort Kumter." The call of.tlio president for found a qilick response in his as it did all throngh the north. Aud when thc drams and aroused the eciioes of tho quiet sfrejEts of PoUnd, among the first appli- cants for enlistment was William Mc- Kiricf, Jr. It was a 'now osperioneo and a new school that thtUfc-year-old boy entered, this school of war, bnt ho had Wonder- ful teachers. It was his good fortune that assigned him to Twenty-third Ohio. Thc recruits that composed it were in June, 1861, mustered midform- sd into a regiment. Its first colonel waa W K-iser-rang, afterword major general commanding the-dcparhnent of the Cumberland. Second in command was Stanley Matthews, who was a splen- did soldier, bnt won his greatest honors in civil life by becoming United States senator and justice of tho United States supreme conrt; and Rn t h erf ord B. Hayes, afterward governor of Ohio and president of tho United States. These arc a few of the illustrious men who wore bonlo on tho roll <-f officers of the gallant regiment in which murcht d Pri- vate William jMcKinhy, Jr. He carried the musket for 14 mouths; then ho was promoted. But lie won 'his promotion hqnesfly. His comrades Of the rank aud file boar testimony to tho fact that he was a gond soldier; that he performjed every duty devolving upon him with fidelity and intelligence and without complaint. They congratulated him, therefc-re, when he was made com- missary sergeant of the regiment after Antietam, he was made a second lieutenant, and tho Hahoning county boy had risen from the ranks. He was uuwtoall intents and pur- poses a trained He hifd had his baptism in Hood at Carnifex Ferry. He had gone Lirongh West Virginia campaign and become? a part of tho magnificent Army of thc Fotoman under McQlellan. South Mountain and Autie- tam had been made immortal by the, blood of heroes, and tb< snonlder straps were worn with u due bub not exagger- ated realization cf the responsibilities they implied. lie became a second lieu- tenant ou 24, 1862. Ho wart pro- moted to first lieutenant Feb. 7, 1S63. His commission as captain boars date July S3, 18G4. Tim of major was con ferred by President Liner lu "for gal- Uuit and meritorious services at tho Iwt- Optquiin, Fisher's Crct'k and Cedar Hill.'' Ho was with Sheridan in the Sliouauduali campaign; was ut Winchester, Cedar Citek, Fisher's Opequau, Kerustown, Flcyd Mountain and Berryville, his horso was shot fiuui under him, and in all tho battles in which the Twenty-third par- ticipated. He served tho stuffs of Generals Hayes, Crook, Hancock and Carroll. HP waa mustered out with tho regiment July 20, ISGo, after more than four years' continuous servicp. M'KINLEY AS A LAWYER. He Wanted to Continue Bltt Military Ca- tcer, but Ilia Parentn Objected. When the war cloW, McKinley'was just 22. He was full of youthful en- a wise, economical and honorable administration, and, to far as can be douet the improvement aud elevation of tho public service." From tha day of his maupuratioh Governor McKiuley took the-greatest in- terest iu the management cf tlie'public benevolent institutions of tho bt.Ue, and he made a of means for thdr bet- terment. During ln.s first term the state board of arbitration was created, anil the workings of tiie.board a mat- ter of personal supervision during tho entire four vours of. his administration. This board has had its services enlisted in 28 strikes, and m 15 cases its cffurtb have been smccissful. No account of McKinley's connection with labor problems would be comph te without some mention of thc tireless energy wliich he displayed in securing relief for the miners in the- Hock- ing vallry mining district who early in 1895 were reported out of work and dcs titute. The new.s to the gov- ernor one night at midnight, but before 5 o'clock in the morning he hud upon his own responsibility jdispatehid to the President Hayes thus spbfco to the young afflicted district a car ajiitaminfc representative: worth of pi-ovisipnp. Later ho nude ap- "To achieve success and fame you Pcals assistance and finally dis'.ri- welloutlimdwlirn in his inauffural-id- Naturally tho mother rtiw or fisb- he sard: "It is my dcsiro to co- pridr....... operate witli you in every endeavor to monotonous sort of" a life. No tj. cooking, dusting or washing Lone. The unvarying diet is frozen people-never with pride on a son, aud she fol- wafan; bnt sometimes grease themselves with keen in ten bt the progress of Wltfa 'whale oil. l Winter is spent in turf DAY AND NIGHT. l HAiTIILWd fl rmmd hisdnwiij 1 VOi.'a ilrowpj day d Tho Tj null tap- stnes of Kold and r, d, And weary -jf 111-, flight, BluWH out tilt- pidatt 'Tib must purmio a line. Yoa must among the familus iu th" district clothing uijtl provisions to the amount of M'KINLEY'S HOME-J.IFE. Hft Wiffe Is un Imalirtjbiit Slio Aids Him Iii His Work. Major Mi'K'uley's hi-ine is rrry happy, despite f.ter that h.s v.ifi is im iuv.ihd. McKmlov 1 FEtKCH THRIFT AND ECONOMY. A OKFAT N MOST PC) W'MH'AI, I'LOI'LK IN THE Pretty nearly t-vf-nlxxly knnwn that France is the heaviest 
                            

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