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Wellsboro Agitator: Thursday, September 2, 1858 - Page 2

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   Agitator, The (Newspaper) - September 2, 1858, Wellsboro, Pennsylvania                               THE TIOGA AGITATOB. y A- f'rt l i ii% mi Albert Barnes on Human Slavery. Albert Barnes, the distinguished Philadel- pbl commentator, m writing on ihe passage in Isu'ah, "here it is prophesied of Jesus Christ ihat he shall "proclaim liberty to IJ J. Cobb Ed tor Proprietor. herCommnnicationtmust beadcressedto the F.ditortoinsureallention. We cannot publish anonymous communications. WE -.LSBOROUGH, PA. the raptteet and the opening of the Tlmrsdajr to are (Isa, 61; uses the (allowing language; "While ilie main thing intended [in this passage] wa.s that Christ shonld deliver mea from the inglorious servitude of sin, it also means, ihat the gospel would comma prin- ciples inconsistent with ihe existence of sla- very, and wauld ultimately proddce univer-, sal emancipation. Accordingly it us a mailer of undoubted fact, that us influence was such ihnt less ihan three centuries it was the And some snap their fin- jay, Aug. 27, and organized by calling C. honestly asserted what we thought was true, Alleys was thrown into intense extuJJi my: What are you in (j Esq to the Chair Messrs. N. that "its redeemer Itvelh." As regards the by the loud report of a pistol, followed Wl erwhelmingr We fjostsrocK, and 1. M. BODING, were elected (alter assertion we are still of the opinion outcries of several bojs said u> have wl Republican Ifominations. For GALUSHA A. of Susquehana. (Subject to llit decision of the Conference For ...-.....____.........._____ L. P. WIL LIST ON, of Wellsboro'. mentis of abolishing slavery ibroughout ihe LEWIS 3AWH, Of Coudenport. (Subject to tho decision of the Conferees For Sheriff. PO WER, of Latennct. i For Commissioner, L. DJ SEELEY, of Brootyeld. Roman Empire and no candid reader of the New Testament can doubt ihat if ihe pnnci- pies of Christianity were universally followed, ihe lust shackle would soon fall from Ihe slave Be the following facts remembered; 1. No man ever made another originally R slave, under ihe influence of Christian prin- ciple. No man ever kidnapped another, or sold another, because it was done in obedi- ence to the laws of Christ. 2 No chnsiian ever manumitted apslave, who did not feel that in doing was obeying the spirit of who did not have a more quiet conscience on thai account. 3 No nmn doubts that if freedom were to prevail everywhere, and all men were to be regarded as of equal nghis, il would be in accordance with the mind of ihe Redeemer. 4 Slaves are made in violation of all the precppis of the Savior. The work of kid- napping and selling men, women, and chil- dren of tearing them from their homes, and confining them in ihe pestilential holds ol ships on ihe ocean, and of dooming them to hard and perpetual not work to which the Lord Jesus calls his disciples o Slavery, in fact, cannot he maintained without an incessant violation ol the prin- ciples of ihe New Testament Id ihe whole work of from ihe first cnpiure of ihe unoffending person, who is n idt M slave to the last net "huh is adopted lo secure his bondage, ihere is an incessant and unvarying trampling on Ihe laws of Nut one thing is done lo make and keep a in accordance with com- mand of Christ one ihmg which would be done if his example were followed and his Uw obeyed Who ihen cap doubt that HP cime ultimately to proclaim fieedom to nil captives, and that the prevalence of his uospd will yet be the means of universal emancipation universal in any community than in Ibis; but, un- der certain circumstances, the mightiest strength avails nothing. Inaction renders the stron r arm as weak a very babe's, gere at the minority and ray the field, against each overwl cite yon to the old The race is not lo the swift, nor the battle to the strong; it 13 to the vigil- ant, Ihe active, the brace." The veriest coward can. swing his hat in the hoar of victory, but only the brave man can calmly look defeat in the only the brave man can enter a contest where t efeat, ut- ter and disastrous defeat stares him the face before a blow is struck. Friends, such is the foe we have to encounter. Contemptible in numbers it may be, but in the little craft and unwritten villainies of political warfare thoroughly posted. It is ihe party whic.i upholds a gigantic system of fraud and wrong in fifteen Republican Co. Convem Ion. The Republican Convention met pursuant to call, at the Court House, Wellsboro, Fri Tbe OT'Kcan County Bank. In our issue n fortnighUmce we stated lhat _ the Bank was sound, At that time we the neighborhood of Carpenter's and Vi rerrtMe Affair-Eight Boy, Last night, about half.past eight 0' Secretaries. Messrs. J. F. Donaldson, Vine Pui and G. W. Stanton were appointed a Committee on Credentials. The following persons presented their cre- dentials as delegates: Yonkin, I. M. Bod me. T. Gardner, J. W. Fitch. W. Beach, G. Larnson. D. Vanduzen, G. W Ray. Hart, H P. Oockstader. B. Goodnow, H. S. Jaquish. B Smith, J E. Whitman. From the Philadelphia Press. A Peruvian Exile. A few weeks since a nun, with a long brown beard, made his appearance in our village, calling himself Dr, Gerardm. He pretended to bo a native of Peru, and an exile for liberty's sake. He had also fought under Walker the filibuster. His accent was pure without even a touch of the Spanish. pretended to be a gentleman of leiiure, and of unlimited knowledge, and lo be liberally supplied with "the needful" by an adorable sister lhat still resided on ihe paternal hacienda. For the sake of pastime, and lo enlighten the natnes, he undertook, to deliver a few lectures upon "The Humbugs of the "American Antfqui- finally winding up wuh private medical lectures lo the men and lo the ladies. A few of the leclures were free, and for ihe remainder he charged only the moderate sum of ten cents admittance. His leclures, at least the oulilic ones, (we did not hear the abounded in blun- ders and falsehoods. He claimed lo be able to cure all manner of diseases, and especially all chronic cises And as the fools are not all >et dead, he gol a few lo pay him in ad- vance. We have not yet heard of the cures. For a time he kept sober, and made qure a sensation. But during the hot days ol Julv his thirst the quanueso1" fluid lhat he imbibed often weakened his limba and fuddled his brain. At last for some improper conduct jto vard the "help'' in the kitchen, he was commanded by "mine host" t e to leave in double quick lime, which command, after sundry challenges to mortal combat, he obeyed. In Janesville, a neighboring village, he ran up a bill for board and drink to a considera- ble amount, and he gave the good publican a check on one of the Easton banks, in which he claimed to have large deposits. The bank, however, declared it knew no such person, and refused to dance 10 such a tune. Finally, his presence became intolerable, and Ihe CIM- zens made him up a small purse lo leave. The last we heard of him he was going toward Mifflin. He has a pocket full of blank checks, drafts, and we would advise all men ever) where not to listen with too much confidence to this distinguished stranger, and we would respectfully suggest to the ludies not to be too hasty'in falling in love with this learned and gallant Peruvian exile, as it is said he has a wife and half a dozen children in New York. Yours truly, J. A. HtZLETO'J, Pa. Far Auditor, JAMES I JACKSON, of Delmar. TIUDDKUB STEVENS has been nominated for Con- gress by the P'ople's Convention of Lancaster Co Tlie lovers of sights will find the advcrtisemer t of Sa nils Nallian'u Circus m another place. Tl e town is ablaze with show bills. We have received communications from, Galem Virginia, Edith, Glamorgan, and others, some of wlnchj have been wailng publication two weeks. Be indulgent. Our palters arc in delectable confu- sion. Mr 6 R SBEFFER, o' Liberty, tins credit on our book for the J gttator up to Vol 6 No. 1. For the words of chefr which accompanied Ihe remittance we ari sincere y grateful. Rev J JOLALEHON has been appointed lo the charge of the VI E Church m this borough. I e comes highly recommended as a staunch friend of practical Christianity May his sojourn here prove mutually profi able all shortcomings in this depait- ment thu, wee t be borne with patiently. Every word icre prir ted' has teen written under the sha -p spur ojf Necessity} and nol from inclination or lo'e of duty Tr.nslent indisposition renders mental labor difficult ind exhausting at present We hear it rumored that our Democratic friends have nominated JNO Mr. BAILEY, of Charleston, far Sheriff Air Jailey is an excellent man, hut a very bad pohticiar An uncompromising disciple oi James Buchar an, he depends upon the full Lecorrp- ton strength in the will doubtless get it We have no a iprelienuons that he will run ahead of his party vote It is ijikewi-e rumored that the same party have nominated JOEL PARKHCRST for Assembly This is a very good jjke indeed, but Parkhurst save t lem the expense of printing tickets. We id notJook fur f) candid an admission of tho fact if it beV fict, th-t (hat party his not confidence enough in theVfew wlso still ad lere to its ranks to propose them for There is hope for that party yet. great States and boldly declares that Slavery exists under the Constitution, if nol exprenly prohibited' Bulkley, M. V. Purple. by local law. And do you think inch a party will I. Jackson, E. H. Hastings. balk at anything that promises to ennre to ben- C. W hittaker, G. Parkhursl.. efit? ItwillcoL You can stroke the lion's tongue E. Smith, D. W. Ruggles. if you choose; but if its thorny spines lacerate yon Cass, GeoL Hall. blame nobody. C. Vermilyea, 0. A. Smith. Republicans, w.hile we bear your colors, you may W. Reynolds. E. Kmner. look for them in the thick oi the fight. However N. Comslock, Wm. Tiffany, distasteful this ceaseless warfare may be to Beeman, G. W. Stanton. ever barren of peace life may prove, whatever be. M S. Baldwin, G. S Ransom, we consent to bear ihe colors, you shall ih Harding, D. W. Canfield Hammond, G. C. Kmney. W. Babb, E. Blackwell. W. Adams, J A. Holdep. Tyler, J. Beebee Crnndall, W. T. Humphrey. Lawrence, S Frost. C. Ripley, A M. Spencer. W. Doud, E. A Fish. Hard, Harry Ellis. De Pui, C. H. Seymour. A. A. McNaughton, Jacob Kelts. Melmosh. F Donaldson, G. S. Cook. not have it to say that you saw them fuller at any stage of the fight, nor that they have been lowered a single inch. To tbc Front! HORRIBLE DEATH Jolm Hockaday, of Warrensburg, a harness early on Sunday morning last, went in'o his bedroom where his wife lay and in a hurried and em- barassed manner, with his hand placed upon his throat, endeavoring to tell his wife some thing, with incoherent exclamations, and in a moment hasu'v turned round two or three times and quickly passed into an adjoining room. His wife seeing he was in distress, immediately sprang from the bed and fol- lowed him just in lime to see him lie down on the Moor, and after one or two faint efforts at breathms, die. As too often with sudden deaths, his death wns attributed to disease of the heart, but a post mortem examination revealed ihe fact that ihe deceased had choked to dealh. A The cowan even, cjn face dealh, but the trnly brave man on y can stand face to face with life nor flinch from lU dunes and responsibilities. Una great thing tc labor fa thfullv to the end in a guod cause it is a good thing to speak of cheer to each other now and then, lest some faint and fall by the wuv. Il so happens that not a few, honest and earnest men though hey may be, shrink from the conti mi. ai warfare of ainst wrong without which no endu- ring victory :an be gained. It is those who con tinue faithful to the end who receive the crown. It is a life battle, this struggle with ma tcr whether it cc me in the guise of Slavery or in anj other ol its manifold fcrms, for wrongs, like ferers are but types of a great abnormalism in society as the other is n the physical economy. They nrual be fought at every step in the march of Progress. Wrong never pauses, never sleeps, never retreats. It presents a bold front and conquers or lulls dead in itr tracks jn so much Right should emulate Its great enemy n e arc now lairly entered upon anu her campaign, ir Icgral of that in which the energies of oil earnest men are daily spent. Overwhelming as is he force of Freedom in this county, none of us can be spared from the van of battle, no band can be idle, no shut in sleep. There is no increase without labor, no progress without strife, no sccLnly wilhbnt vigi a nee lepublicais, we have worked as one in foul no )ly fought and gloriously resulting campaigns. We have all reaped a rich reward lor that labor in the consciousness of laving done our, duty and so fit hfully all labored that no lone can c aim precedence over any other. The victories accrued to our unitec arms, the glory to Hun who strength-, ened andsustamed us. We cheered each other with earnest worLs, we strengthened each other with earnest and manly resolve, and thus we conquered. We come to you fifth ting you lake us by the hand and strengthen us for the wor t The e is need ul it, notwithstanding the cer. tamty of vi tory as we behold it mirrored in the gloiy of part success There is need of it Not every one tl at labors labors in the sunlight. Not every one tl at dispenses words of cheer keeps one for iimsell. Not every one that exhorts to abor does so out Df the abundance of his own strength. But hundreds have trained their hands to duty and their lips tc worcs ol cheer, and yet and yet faint by he way beca jsc the waters no longer gus i un der their fett, and others halt from weariness while their fellow workers sleep; and some stumble while removing o jslruclions from the common path, ever cry ng Turn ye turn ye to the East, Set' the day is breaking yet have ne rer caught a glimpse of the bksscc day the' herald and whose coming is sure. Friends, t is a glorious privilege to strengthen the hands of the weak and to encourage the des- pairing to uplift the fallen and bind up the broken; lo counsel the errirp and to confirm the ha ling. And in sucU labors coea the victory lie. Shoulder lo shoulder, frionds, 13 the true order oi battle. ie wins who as one having perishable I ire; not as one who suffers Self to blot out the interests of llie race with its hateful ec ipse; not as one THE labors of Ihe Repnbl can Con- vention of last Friday resulted in the nomination of the ticket which will be found floating at our mast head to day. We consider it a strong exceptionable as lo men and not less so as to loci- tion. It is a ticket, to Che support of which every Republican can rally, and for which we can labor cheerfully and zealously. Mr. WILUBTON, (or Assembly, is so we I and so favorably known to our peeple that he needs no in. troduclion or endorsement at our hinds. Certainly this county has been no more ably and faithfully represented at Harnsburg than by him JV r MANN, who is the choice of Polter, is a sterling Republican, Who abandoned the Democratic party when thai parly abandoned Us principles We know him to be an earnest and devoted friend of free labor, free soil and free men, entitled to the unlulteung sup- port of every friend of freedom. S I POWER, for Sheriff, has been one of the most efficient working Republicans in the party. Like Mr Mann, he led the Democratic party when that party went over to the Slave Power. By occupation he is a farmer and a good one, and he will make a thorough and efficient Sheriff; Enured to labor, he is prepared to sympathize with the laboring man lo the fullest L. D SEKLEY, for Commissioner, is a man of un- blemished integrity, a working man, industrious, prudent and faithful. He ailed with the Democrat- ic party unlit 1854, since which he has been a thor- ough-going Republican. No belter man far Ihe of- fice 'could have been selected. JAS I JACKSON, for Auditor, is likewise a man of unimpeachable integrity and well qualified to dis. charge Ihe duties of the place creditably and well. He formerly acted with the Whig party, but lies been with the Republican party, heart and soul, from its organization. Such is a brief, but candid exhibit of tie merits of the ticket II cannol be beat. NEWSPAPER last number of the Honetdale Democrat contains the Volediclory of its former able editor, F. B PENNIMAN, Esq We re- gret lo lose the vigorous pen of our brother, just at this time, Freedom has need o" her best and most faithful champions. But this regret is not a htlle softened by the knowledge lhat ie retires upon a competence, and amid the rural scenes of a farm life, will find that relaxation and quiet which many of his coleinporarics will never find in this world. If we mistake not, editors seldom retire up- on a competence; and as for a are they who can coqnl on more than twelve feet, all told, with the assurance that nobody will disturb their ashes. EDWARD A. PENNIHAN succeeds our brother, and will, with experience, render the Democrat as pble and efficient as it has heretofore nndemab y proved. We are glad to extend to him the right hand of fel- lowship. HP The National Vedette and Montrose Republi can, both have labored wilh Ihe Agitator, out broth- er Cobb IB much, or ino-e so Ihnn Sanderson and the slrait-out Filhnore men of '56 Wilket.Barre With this marked difference: We ask some rec ogmlion of Republican principles in a Convention assuming to represent Ihe Republican party. San- derson cared only to defeat Freedom; we care only tode'eat Slavery in the final battle. If, as friend Miner admits, the Dred Scott Case and the Fugitive Slave Law are alike infamous, let 143 say it at all limes and on all proper occasions. Let us call ty- rants TTRANTS and for one, we ask no alliance which, to gam, requires a single sentiment of truth or justice lo be suppressed. But we have no heart for this internecine war, nor do we intend to step aside from the path of duly to change a vole on Ihe Slate ticket, but there 13 one vote over which we have sole jurisdiction and control. KANSAS ELECTION. Total vole so far as returned Maj. against Buck and Slavery We know the -Arg-wand lhat bort o' Dem- ocracy don't like these returns, but as the people do we shall print 'em. The majority of the Settlers o" Kansas over Buck, Slavery, Breck, Bill English, Oxford, Kickapoo, Squatter Humbuggery, Bordei Ruffians, Beef Bigler, Bribes and Threais, Calhoun, Lecompion, and the..... rest of ihe pnriy, wont be much .over Ten Thousand' "Freedom for Lewisburg Chronicle. There being no contested seats, on molion ihe Convention proceeded lo determine the order of nominations by a ctco none vole. The result being doubtful, the yeas and nays were ordered, upon the following proposi ion "The nominations for Representative shall be first in order according to usage.'1 M. Hart objected and mdved to amend by substituting the word "Sheriff" in the place of "Representative." A question of order was raised by J. F. Donaldson but the Chairman decided.to accept and submit the amendment. The yeas and being called resulted us follows Ayes, 14 Noes, 47. So the amendment was rejected. The following persona were proposed for Representative L, P. Williston, C. O. Bowman, J. S. Hoard, F. E. Smith. On 6th billot ihe vote stood as follows: VVilliston 35; Bowman 16; Hoard 4; Smith 9. Mr. Williston was declared duly nominated. The following persons were proposed for the office of Sheriff: A len Dajjgetl, G. Mudge, R. Chnsienat, E Bowen, .1. Rose, A. K. Bozard, E. H. Cornell, J. E. White, A. G. Ellioii, S. I. Power, M. Seeley, L. Culver, I. F. Field. On the 21st ballot the vote stood as follows: Power 32 Elliott 27 Mudge 3. Mr. Power was declared duly nominated. The following persons were proposed for the office of Commissioner: L. D. Seeley, E. W. Gnnnell, John Gib- son, E S. Seeley, D. W. Canfield, John Diily, G. P Cnppen, C. F. Butler. On the 8ih ballot, the vote stood as fol- lows: L D -Saeley 23 G. P. Cnppen 24. The names of the others were generally wuh- drawn prior lo the 7lh billot. L.'D. Seeley was declared duly nominated. The following person? were proposed for the office of Auditor: Jas I. Jackson, H. Morgan, D. T. Gard- ner. L Gray. Mr. Jackson was nominated on 1st ballot. Messrs. Vine De Pui and G. W. Sianlon were elected Congressional Conferees. Messrs. Wm. Adams nnd J BTPoiter were elected Represenlanve Conferees. The following resolutions then sub- stituted and adopted without objection. The House was very thin. Resolved, 1. That we are urn Iterably op- posed to (he extension of Sltvery into any territory now in possession of the United States, or that ihe m ly hereafier become possessed of; that we reaffirm the right of Congress, under the Coi solution, to prohibit, by positive enactment the extension nf that great national evil over unoiher fool of, I he common domain. 2. That we look upon the action of the Federal Judiciary in the Dred Scoti case as a dangerous usurpation, defying lot only the guaranteed rights of the States, b it the rights of individuals up new distinc- tions, by virtue of which the cit zens of one that it was well founded, and at the present shot. On hastening to the spot We )a lime have not a doubt but that every dollar some of the particulars of one of of its liabilities will be redeemed. That we terrible shooting affairs we have ever rtc, have been grossly deceived however, in some ed. It appeared lhat Mr. ft cCurdy, matters connected wiih the Bank, we have and well-known citizen resnjem OD (W. no disposition to deny, and, in fact, are de. ter's Alley, was married yesterday sirous of acknowledging. II we have in any to a young of some way assisted in perpetrating frauds, in bols- twenty-four age. This termg up infamous transactions, we want the the ages of ihe couple excited remark an world tu know that wo were acting in good the neighbors, who expressed iheir faith and was not cOgmzant of the enormi- without reserve alf what they ty of the transactions. If the oily lopgue of unnatural union. It seems that the ihose steeped in iniquity, and many years fully sympathized with the feelings of our senior, have made us "to believe a lie older people. In the evening a lhat we may be we trust that they them, perhaps fifteen or twenty, may meet their just deserts, and lhat our about Mr. McCurdy's residence and friends will extend to us all the leniency pos- menced pelting the house with sible. The most prominent reason which has stones, some of which were thrown caused us 10 recommend the instuuiion to ihe the windows and doors. Mr public favor is the fact that Daniel Kmgsbury is us President; and we doubi very much whether a man of more sterling integrity can be found within the limns of the Common- wealth of Pennsylvania. He, however, hav- ing a large amount of business upon his hands left the principal charge of the Bank on ihe crowd, wounding, as we are mfonJ in ihe hands ol the Cashier, and before he eight of the bovs Mr McCurdy was a (ihe President) was aware of it pretty much ed and taken before the Mayor, who all the bills and assets of the Bank had been to bail for examination ihis afternoon transferred by the Cashier lo his confederates, affair is an unfortunate one, and Such bold and impudent rascality hardly has regret and anguish lo all concerned m __ a parallel in the annals of crime. Every ef- That ihe boys committed a gross ouiragjj fort is now being made by the President and assailing the house as they did no onetj Directors to recover the assetls, and we are deny that Mr McCurdy did nghj in til credibly informed lhat out of about the law into hia own hands we will not taken, they have already regained nearly but no one will regret the occurrence 000. Mr Kmgsbury tells us thai he is than he He has been a resident of ih confident the bank will be made good in a for nearly forly years, and has bornen very few days. It is his desire lhat the peo- character of a peaceable ci izen pie of the County should take ihe Bank into Journal. their own hands, use every exeruon to pre serve ihe charter, and place it upon a found anon that the winds and waves of commer- cul revulsions cannot affect. Mr. Kmgsbury assured us that he was in favor of the Bank remaining located at Smethport, and should oppose a removal at any future time Now, we1 ask, is it nol for the interests nf the peo pie of M'Kean to preserve ihe charier, impossible It is the last one (hey will ever McCurdy to I out and remonstrated with ihem, them lo go away, but they paid no i lo him. The company present were i alarmed, fearing personal injury froo mub without. Mr McCurdy ihen pistol heavily loaded with shot and Oreal For moie than a quarter of a cenlary Possen has been afflicted with a severe' umatic complaint For twenty ihree jail he has lam on his back entireU He has not a joint in his whole he has ihe use and but few which entirely, or partially, dislocated M mouons of which he is capable beiidesi ge( from a Legislature of organs of sjirech are a slight mnvements hig nancjS) which lie drawn acia M'Kean Citizen. .The Tioga Agitator and the Peo. pie's Convention. Count us says the Agitator, m answering some arguments of the Honesdale Democrat, in favor of supporting the People's Ticket. The National Vedette and ihe Montrose Republican, both have labored w ith the Agi tator, but brother Cobb is as much, or more so, than Sanderson and the straight out Fillmore men of '56. The Republicans of Philndelphm list year, insisted on running their own municipal ticket, uhere they could only hope for three or four thousand votes, nnd iherebv weakened Ihe chance of Mr. Cobb's favorite Wilmot They were as unreasonable as the Americans who refused to support Wilmot. If no Ami-ncan wi'l support a liokel op posed lo slavery extension which does nol endorse prescriptive Know Nothmgism, and no Republican support one which does not endorse Abolnionism, how is ihe great op- posiuori lo be united. We should have bern pleased if the Hirrisburg Convention had re- solved lhat no s ave Stale should hereafter be admitted into the Union withoui the sane tion or a majority of the people of nil the Stales That ihe Dred Scott decision and ihe Fugitive Slave Act are alike infamous We should hive bei n betler pleased if it had been resolved that it is ihe of govern ment to pro'ecl American la'wr, bu we shall not oppose the ticket, nor be "counted neu- tral" because it was nol as we liked A little yielding to circumstances in our more ardenl Republican friends may do much towards consolidating ihe opposition in 1860 U'e cannot afford lo lose the'services, of our Tioga friends nor can we well bear the effects of such evil example in the present slate of parlies. Blair was defeated in St Louis by this unyielding spirit on the part of the Rppubli Brother Cobb will regret n if the bogus pro slavery democracy shall triumph in Pennsylvania ov a majority such as us active influence might overcome The re- flexion that he was betler than anv other Republican will nol sofien the Wilkes-Barre Record of the Times. he his bony breast, and of his- jaw so u t.1 admit the point of a lea spoon Helal been entirel-y blind for 'he last fifteen yeail Some eight or len days ago one of bis i was amputated which had begun to be hop! lessly affected, with gangrene His beaiinjl is slili good and he converses so as o tel distinctly understood. It is a remirkiial fact, lhat although he has no! seen or aught, for fifteen years, he neighbors as they piss his door on horsebwI or in wigons, by distinguish ng bet was I ihe peculiar sounds of the tread of differo! horses and trie raltle of difTerenl wagons-l was lhat he enlertams a hope al Christ, is submissive, and looks forward world where pain and sorrow are unknown Lei i hose who compli n ol a hard hi mi repine because a few of desires ate cil gratified, visit Mr Possen and they n come away hearts oi craii ude for various and many blessings ihev do Medina, (Orleans Co 3 T) Tnbune IMPORTANT ERY are to o'3-J ed that a new species of inflammable minenl termed "illuminating clay'' has been covered by Mr FREDERICK H Sons I WORTH Mr Southivortb is an resident of Rio Jmeiro. He has prooeriies of this clay ana applied ihe s to ihe mikina of ga.8. He reports 'hi (l gives 7 cubic feet of gus to the pound tvial gives bui 3J cubic feet lo the pounj- The article is of ihe color of and erwise looks like coal in its pure sate, will burn like wax when held to the flaiw a match It is said lo be found deposits on the banks of navigab e rivers- Brazil, and he d scoverer anucipa'es tin will be used by all gas companies in and become an article of exportation Tsl Brazilian government have taken the nn under considerati m Mr applied for ihe privilege of making gas this material in Brazil, and it is will obtain it. TNTFRESTIM, 4.daertiser calls altention lo an coincidence, as fo lows On the fourth of August, 1492 TOPHER COLUMBUS lost sight of I western highlands of I not to see again nil he relumed to g'e I Europe his gift of ihe New World hundred and sixty sW >ears of The Buffalo Express, in speaking of an American stales thru it is estimated -j that ihere are 103 600 000 laving fowls in Stale .ire denied the rights and inmunmes of (he country, of which, fifty millions lav one on the same day the noblest vessel citizens in direct violaiion of egg a day throughout the year This would New World's navy comes in sight m Section 2, of Art. 4, of the Fedjral Consii- the annual crop of eggs, and these, nt eight cents a dozen, would be 3. That theaitemptof the Ac ministration worth 666. The coiton crop of to force a on upon ihe the United Siales, estimaied at Ihe seaboard people of Kansas, while it deserves the repro- according 10 the census of 1850, amounted balion of all honest men, must h3 considered as only one of the legitimate results of the policy inaugurated in the Nebra  '9 a 8on Dudley of the Slate Penitentiary for the years 1858 It is asserted as a smeular circumstance New Worlds, is composed of seven W t hi f largo hen's egg, was found in the sciousncBs duly performed. Such are the souls F'eld, D. D., of S ockbridge in Massachu- and 1859 (After naming ihe Carious items lhat ihe Sunbury Erie Railroad Company per wires, twisted into a cordl-16 I windpipe, which the deceased had been chew. tty.. must vm every triumph of Reform whici shall David Dudley Field, LL. D., a prom- the law makes this further have sold every section of the Slate canals to thick. This strand is coaled ing, probably upon some sudden start, had blew ihe world inent lawyer m New York oily Mr. Jona- purchasing and pulling up addi'ional machi- ihe lowest bidder. By this arrangement the cha, forming a small rope, ihree eigh" been drawn through ihe larnyx into Ihe Then let us up and to work. Freedom cannot than E. Field, of Stockbridge, a well known nery, Thai no part of State has been defrauded of a considerable inch thick, then coaled with windpipe, from whence its size prevented us loo broad and utrong defences. Areweotrong lawyer of Western Massachusetts, and Mr. the same shall be expended in the State of amount of money, fivery principle of hon- twice soaked of 18 iron wires being ejecicd by any means in the sufferer's m Tioga? Yes, we are powerful here; the senti- Stephen I. Field, one of the Judges of the Su- Massachusetts, nor for machinery manufac- esty and fair dealing demand matter be being a strand of seven finer Falls Frie Print incut of Freedom deeper set ar.d more pteme Court of Cahforniji. arc Ins Brothers, lured m that State. ventilated. in all 126 wires. Cbftthtm, on the j. t CUitaa Andrwi the ait, aa. a protracted d bore her snffenn and at laic T in neaWn r in the divtae i, and wma hap 17 d with all her Irk Where no tearv Where ties an n Whew riYCTs Where Ood in hi TEETS every ynda L tafc f WelUbor ALEXANDER, R RAT Tafcen n I Intt, a large BBC ore property, tST KECETvfi   

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