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Wellsboro Agitator Newspaper Archive: June 3, 1858 - Page 1

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Publication: Wellsboro Agitator

Location: Wellsboro, Pennsylvania

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   Agitator, The (Newspaper) - June 3, 1858, Wellsboro, Pennsylvania                               T FIRM. v V j. a very >clioice and ent of AND FANCY GOODS, md Provisions, furnish them to customers at Prices in any other Market upon finding at al! times any i.and all Goods wanranted.il> idles1 Dress Goods, apicd lo every variety of trim. iu> well to call and examine the ing elsewhere. t Co., have always bribinj ifcnable stock of Leady-Made Clothing iVtbc lowest CASH PRICES ALSO, Hardware, and Wooden Oils, Paints Stuffs of every Ttind the brst quality, SHOES, for Everybody. Country I'roduct taken in ex. lit? marketpjiLCS. Tilt; ,XD F Til. Iit-d, the 3d Edition. ORRHKA OR SEMINAL DIS. scientific Treatise on the treat. lire c.f Nervous Debility, Seminal U-iry Kimssions, Impotence, IiiitM'.s acquired daring the jm YauUi In Manhood. A'. ,val College of Surgeons of Enf. of the Hall Author lealth." "Green "How to oir.-. ufSinglc and Married highly valuable Treatise, written i-d -Physician and Surgeon, poiirt, cure tor aill diaea nd '.f abuse, arid Is lhe only publics. nttcn in a benevolent spirit and i. It should be in the hands of liie and health and happiness. >r -1 stamps, at the receipt ofwbich Irre, and well secured, by Dr -lit) 1st L on Poi kc Manual of Practical Hor. !w tu Cultivate Kitchen Vegeta. and Ornamental Trees and an Exposition of the Jfature and and Manures, lhe Slructnre of I.iws of Vegetable Life and lhe author of "How to Fowler Wells, 308 in paper, 30 cents, ns or rerits a square rod of ground .'.t; tins best of all garden man. :ninfiitly popular and procticil d -nnpie in style thai everybody convenient in form and size it i! in the pocket; and so low in huvit; while at the same lime it -riliinsive, and perfectly reliable, tivate everything belonging to the hint trees how to ciioose the best to prune, graft, bad, destroy :ind vegetables, and save only tells the reader what to do, be done, thus giving him a new The chapter on tbft Flower ut tiie ludies are wanting. Adapt. tl.e South as well as the Norli. -mull a hundred tiroes its cost to le season. PRO vision, clROCERY. RIIIJ'S Building. UT li.is just received a new and slock of Pork, Dried Beef, Salt Dried FruHs, Cor- iir.cs. Dates, s, lA'nu'ns, and Pickles. II ijrad.is and prices lo suit, Ten, Sjiutl, and NUTS of all kinds. .ins Mulas.scjt and refined Syrnjn, i-iuily kept-m a country Grocery, a-, can be found in Tioga Co, X to purchase will do well to call before purchasing elsewhere, H.VVOOD. .y KKTAIL DEALERS ft PER LEATHER. HOOTS SHOES. PORK 4- .V.S Jf GROCERIES, chcMfi as the cheapest. IlHles, and ,-AV Bailey's Store. Sear's 1C building. ly. icld Select School, I1.. HI H1.IMIAMK, A. It. Term will commence T ose Kriday, May hsh and French........... of iliis School is-, to furnish it, to continue their y. No cirrtion Will be spared I 1 culture ihoroujh and to lonstant sclf.rc-lianee andalst of Common Schools for. the dii )f thfir [irnfission. Feb. 25, 1-.W. Terms of Publication. THE TIOGA COUNTY pnh Id every Thursday'Morning, and mailed to sub nr relOonable-pticft of he sha have expre, on the margin of the last paper. ,h ty' T nto reaching into increasing circulatrqn every neighborhood in the of falage many Post-offies Illn ilie county lirmto, and to those living wilhin Boils, but "hone most convenient postoffiqe may io an adjpining County. Business Cards, not exceeding 5 lines, paper in- eluded, per year. 1 WHILE THERE SffALI, BE A WRONG USRIGHTED, AMD UNTIL MAN'S INHUMANITY TO MAN1' SHALL CEASE, AGITATION MOST CONTINUE. YOL: IV. WILLSBOBO, LITTLE For The Agitator. W ILL IE. amined lasl yen; who received certificates earnest, kind-hearted and'capable can answer all questions of practical im marked with moil than two "1's" (two ek- nrien arid women with a tact for leaching, porianiie without embarassmeni, in a majorih LEV respectfully informstbec horoand thai he id and will manufacture to order, irs Cabinet-Ware oils of purchasing any K lo call and examine his stocij' I from the best I lisljcUon. ffljj. I Tl'KXING done in a isonable terms. I >boro'. [Jan. 8, W RQ BE'R'i Albany Agricultural WorBS, for the sale of their'" inplcinents. Among the a larket are P AT KM T HORSE Fi- nd Straight X cat Saws tor and Hickock I ills, Dog Sheep Churn ned Threshers and Cleaners, i Drills, and Feed iping Mowing Machines- amine their Illustrated Cat? D st market price iushels of Wheat f Pork. Nov. Replaced intellejtual qualifications very iigh. ijshed under the new law operated lo drive leave it lo ihe Superiniendenl. Mr. D. Bacon, was in favor of reducing their friends the opposition (o the new law in .the time from six hours to half an hour. He good part proceeded. They had cause to be jlhoughi six questions in each branch would alarmed. He said lhal the present system enough lo give the Superintendent a fair knowledge neces-sary to successful teaciing. had only to be fairly tried to become popular of the capabilities of candidates. As "embarrasmjnt" had been offered BS an had become so wherever ii had been best Mr. Vanduzen, agreed with oihers lhal six Ha aimed to pnt no puzzling questions to this class from ihe Schools. From them and teachers, but on y such as were really essen- ial. Teachers, should take rank as ihey were more or less familiar with the practical In borne that he enlivened, one who loved him u Everything seems very lonely now onr Willie 't dead Yej, and for a weary season, gladness has gone out, yjvrn the rooms thht once resounded, with his merry shout. >'o long weeks of pain (ind anguish, racked his mile frame; Very soon, to end his saff'rlng, Death in merfy came. bright, snnny, Sabbath Willie was at play, Ere another Sabbath sunset, in his grave he layl A. the seasons come and vanish, o'er that little grave, Binls will sing, and flow'ra blossom, and the tall grass wave, But remember, yo who lov'd him, though the spot be fair, you left his body resting, WiUie is not there! No tint with bright spirits, in n happy home, Where no taint ft earthly sorrow, evermore can come; And ftr wiecr ami better, Willie now will grow, Thin tliu happiest-littlu children, who remain below. p ROCEEDINGrS Of the Tiogo Co. Teachers' Institute. SECOND DAY. MR. K. WILDMAN in the Chair. MORNING motion the words ''in County" in Art. 2. of Constitution _ were stricken out. ous to admit diffidence nsan excise. Teach- 500 per cent, below where weotight to On mn'ion, Art. 6 was so amended as lo ers dot be slow to take advantage of be. of directors are more effi- such a rule. If teachers are to forgel lo-dny, cient lhan ihey were three years ago. They what they clairr to have known yesterday, begin to understand lhat good teachers can of what praciicsl use is the knowledge lost so easily? He ihought teachers should be credited wilh jist lhe amount of ava lable knowledge ihey possessed. The irue erite- eaching, embarassmeni, in a majoriiy f cases. Mr. H.N. Williams, thought leachers had ho option in the matter of lime consumed by reso- cepted) gave eopjlfcnt Satisfaction, those OilBers employed oecause they were of cases. two would- get cftink. Certificates marked cheap, or favorites with those in power in i he on an average of so far as he knew had districts. Under the old 'system directors done well none lad been turned out. Those could not prevent the swarming of 'these the Sup't. in examinations. That officer of the grade "3" arid "4" had a hard time of hordes of incompetent leachers the districts must be his own judge as to the lengih of it generally. HJ did not agree with Mr. were isolated, and, refused in one quarier they liMe called for. lhat the Calkins in regarc to jntelleciual qualifications. fled to another. Now, all are but saris of speakers that teachers having a good knowl- lute accept ihe proposit.-.. llf a graduate conld not good exanina- one svstemaiic whole and the uniform stand- edge of their business would not, as a rule, be of the Agitator to devote one column! of his book into Common Schools What had its- j f -i i i __ _ ___ ___ _____ 1. 1 tlm ri al iftna I __ I __ __ I ___ __ II i __ _ __ lion, he would nat prove a' succesful teaiher. ard of qualification which had 'been estab-' loo much embarassed to reply Rates of Advertising. Advertisements will be charged 81 per square o fourteen lines, for one, or three insertions, and 25 cents for every subsequent insertion. All advertise- menu of less tlian fourteen: lines considered ax a equate. The following-rales will be churned for Cuarterly, Half-Yearly and yearly 3 months. 6 12 8250 8450 DO .400 600 800 4 column.....1000 ,1500 3000 .1800 30 OQ 4000 All advertisements not having Ibe number of in- sertions marked upon them, will be kept in until or- dered out, and charged accordingly. Posters, Handbills, Hends.nnd all' kinds of Jobbing done in country eatablishmcnla. executed neatly nnd promptly. Justices', Consla and other BLANKS, constantly on hand and irinled lo order. for advanced classes. Men of long preferred it before all others. No one could leach Kenyon except Prof. Kenyan. As for Tower, he began at the wrong'end ended where he begun. I Mr. Bailey, had changed ID opinion some- what since hearing the matler discussed. He members of the Insti- had sjivcn an inch and they had taken an ell. tule accept ihe proposition made by the Editor [Did they wish to introduce that monstrous NO. XLIV. upon "Primary Education." Adjourned-to 9 AL M; of Wednesday. WEDNESDAY MOBNING. MR. 4- WILDMAN in the Chair. "Mr. Niles submitted the following He would paper- weekly 10 the discussion of questions Adoption by colleges to do with it as a Com- pertaining to the educational policy of ibis imon Schools book He thought Kenyon as county or State. good in every sense and would lurn out Unanimously adopted. [some of his Kenyonites against any number Dr. Pratt, in 'behalf of the Democrat, offered a column of that paper for the like ob- ject, which was accepted without discussion. The StaleSuperiniendent Mr. Hickok, then excqse for leachers, he would ask how .much embarrassment should excuse the cane idate with the Superintendent carried out. (Mr. here introduced several hours was long en6ugh time fyr examinations. n_j'j__. i.! _ _ tddressed the Insuiule. of Browniies. Mr. Kirkendall, said ihe gentleman would do well to remember lhal he, himself, laughl Brown's grammar in ihe same school bin a He expressed him-, year before, when he lalked about turning He did not ihm< either six or twelve hours Elelf' delighted with ihe manner of conducting out his Kenyoniies against Brownites. would be sufficient to enable ihe Superintend-' ihe'Institute. He further urged that leachers ft, r. Bailey, said he not only remembered Mr. Hickok, thought that would depend Co. Superintendents were but of ihe em to.judge inielligenily of the candidates should strive to prepare themselves for the ,hat fact, but he had not forgotten in what ..u____.1------.____e ____i_ ._____..__.1____r___ ....'.i. _r r..r proper discharge of ihe duties devolving upon condition he the laughier amusing anecdotes illustrating his subject which were received with applause) The much upon the nature of the embarrasment. people lo carry on the reform. The work of If it arose from modesty, every allowance driving out incompetent teachers w'ias going should be made. Mr. Reynolds, ifi'ought it would be danger cu provide for a semi-annual eleciion of officers. The resignation-of the corresponding Sec- retary was lendered and accepted. On moimn, the President pro tern, was elect- ed to the Chnir for Ihe entire session. On moiion, a Cbmmillee of three was ap- pointed by ihe chair to prepare resolutions for the consideralion of the Institute, as fol- lows J. B. Niles, H. N. Williams and J. D. Vandusen. oh silently but certainly. A huncred per Six hours lo each candidate would be very cent, in progress had been made, and still we well; but wilh a class of 10 teachers it would give only 36 minutes to. each other. One hundred questions per hour would be a small estimate, giving the proper number to each of the six branches. ,Then, al least fifteen minutes would be lost in Three hours of oral examination would give but 10 minutes lo each teacher. Mr. Hart, thought six hours sufficient time for teaching. r L i r u Mr. Bailey, wilh the last speaker, 'ihe Co. Supt., since, from lhe ranks ol that and cheers.) not be hired at a small price. So when in- competent teachers are refused we have a great complaint against the new system. He had established a rule thai no rion for the Su lerinlendent was the present candidate should receive a cerlificale whose lo ascertain ihe qualifications of candidates available knowledge of the candidale. A lecture" was aririounced from Mr. Hickok, upon the ihe Co. Supferintendency, proficiency in brlhography would not enjtiile 'He did not 'upon lo suggest the Amy Rockwell, him lo an .apprenticeship in a country print- proper number of huurs, but opined lhat it profession the Sapl's. musl be laken when ,lhe system becomes perfected. He pro- nounced a farewell blessing. On motion, Hon. H. C. Hickok, was elect- ed an Honorary member of ihe Institute. Adjourned. AFTERNOON SESSION. Minutes of the morning session read and adopted. Demonstrations in Arithmetic. GREATEST COMMON Miss A discussion of the best mode of opening and duly friends of education in and conducting schools was entered into. Mr. Williams, staled lhat he usually open- ed school by reading a poriion of Scripture, following whh a shori lecture upon some ap- propriate ihetne. He recognized order as Heaven's first law, and without system, no sustaining him. Mr. H. said tiat so far as the utility of ihe office was concerned, that was settled beyond ing office. As to lhe office of directors, nine- of the power was delegated to ihem, and rightly. Their duties are arduous and often thankless yel lhe Co. Supt. look much should' nol be an arb'nrarily fixed Proper allowance should be made for embar- assment. Few leachers could stand before Superintendent and remain as free from of the burden from their hands. (Sime onef einbarassmeni as in iheir school-rooms. He a peradventure. That battle had been fought asked if teachers mighi prescribe exercises remembered t hit some of the loudest now 'suitable, in their judgment, to ihe capacities against allowance for embarrasmeni, visibly .of scholars.) Mr. H. thought Ihe teacher quakedln iheir shoes before ihe Superinlend- school could be profitably managed.' He miionally opposed )o (he eniire syslem of had such discretion, under favor o( the Board ent. (laughter.) Six hours, was not suffi- use ihe rod when all olher reasonable means Common' Schods. From this class proceed- directors. The Superiniendent had con- cient for a deliberate-judgment on ihe part of and won. Trus, ihere was slilf no liil e op position from a certain class const! of-persuasion failed. Mr. Wildman, agreed with the first speaker lhat school should be opened by reading a ed the great bulk of the petitions rushed irfto jurisdiction wilh ihe directors in se- ihe Legislature last winter. The people had lexl books. a right to aslt tow their money was Y Mr. Reynolds How do you understand TRUE Augusta Orvis. CCBE Beach. B. Niles. SQUARE E. Kirkendall. LEAST COMMON D. Van- duzen. BEST METHOD OF CALCULATING INTER- Licitlenthaler. REASON OF THE RULES OF ALLIGATION Walbridge, These demonstrations were characterized the Superintendent, as lo tact, and ihose'who by 'great clearness and elicited general ap- poriion of Scripture, followed by They are the source of all 'the law in regard to keeping schools open on ihe laiier lo be at the option of the teacher, oppropriations for public purposes. As one This might lead children lo the knowledge of of 'he officers, 10 could new moral truths. As lo the conduct of schools, he would suggest a short lecture touching ihe relations existing between teach- er and pupil. He was no advocate of many rules of order for the government of schoojs. The lewer laws the belter. Place confidence in lhe pupils, teach them lo be men and wo- men, and thus conirol them through lhe high- er faculties. All necessary rules shpuld be strictly enforced. Offenders should he mild- ly reproved, and if lhe rod was called in, il should not be in the presence of lhe school, and than only at (he lasl pinch. He was in favor of-systematical classification of studies and order ofexercises. He was not in favor of lhe "pouring in" process. It was better to develop the self reliance of the pupil. Mr. Emery presumed that the object in placing him on the Jist of speakers was to learn how schools were conducted twenty years agn. It was wisdom to learn of expe- rienr-e. He had not taught for many years, olher than a private school, in which he had ptaved so successful as lo induce a steady in that Ihe money expended under the present law was judicinusly expended. The 'Stale had expended during last 20 years for Ccmmon School purposes. How had it been expended That Schools were necessary, all nearly all. The question is, how can the evils of lhe sys- tem best be cured The Legislature had ta- ken the matter in hand and had furnished a framework for the of a noble thought that officer could make up his judg meat in half an hour, meant to flatter. It was too large to be true. Dr. Webb, nought the question of time I am utterly opposed to should be left to the Superintendent. He Saturdays 1 Mr. Hickok keeping schools open on Saturdays. Of course, the wishes of the majority of patrons musl be prudently deferred to in such matters. You may' hire a man to chop, split rails or mow, from Monday morning until Saturday night; but you cannot keep little children hard at brain labor six consecutive days with either reason or profit. Education does not consist in intellectual culture only, but in physical and moral as well. The aw does best in the Republic. Means to not define the lengih of a teacher's monih, carry out the refpim were needed. Under the old system he school houses were not fit to receive the children of white peop Heretofore, money appropriated to school purposes, had been no belter lhan thrown away. It was squandered by defaulting offi- cers or expended upon improvements not con- but leaves it to" lhe discretion pf lhe peopJe. So, many improvements were i made, not ex- pressly provided for by law. Ijnsiiiutes, and township associations' were of this class of of healthy progress and legitimate oulgrowihs of the system. Mr. Niles: Should directors receive a templaied by ire law. Under ihe old system stated sum for their services] the schools were often ihe hotbeds of vice immoraliiy, ani were in such a condj   ft Wished   

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