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Wellsboro Agitator Newspaper Archive: February 18, 1858 - Page 1

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Publication: Wellsboro Agitator

Location: Wellsboro, Pennsylvania

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   Agitator, The (Newspaper) - February 18, 1858, Wellsboro, Pennsylvania                               of Publication. TOE TIOGA COUNTY AGITATOR a pub al reader, and is '_._ lundrcd Engravings. All or those contemplating rno least impediment to mart book. Il discloses secrets tin :quainted with. Still pt locked up, and be sent lo any one on the reeeinr I Address Dr. WM.YOUNfiul above Fourth, Phil'a. 'M GUIDE, hy Dr. WM. YOUNg GUIDE, by Dr. WM.yoUNnl GUIDE, by Dr WM YOUNr, 1 GUI UK, by Dr GUIDE, by Dr.WM GUIUG, by Dr WM GUIDE, by Dr WM GUIDE, byDr WM YOUNG I GUIDE, byDr WM GUIDE, byDr WM YOUNG i GUIDE, by DrWM YOUNG j GUIDE, by Dr WM YOUNQJ Gl IDE, by Dr WM YOUNG' RD ASSOCIATION! taut Announcement. -cms afil'iru-J witli Sexual disease. SPF.RMATORRIKEA, SEMINAL IMPOTENCE, GONORRHEA I 'lilt.IS, the Vice of UU) ASSOCIATION ofPhiladelphi, awfut instruction d'hornm life aM by Sexual diseases, and rlircd upon the unfortunate t.y Quacks, have directed their Con. ,n as a CHAIMTABLE ACT worth, to give MEDICAL ADVICE GRi sons thus aiHicied, (Male or Fern cttrr, w ith a description of their 004 habits of life, andj poverty and suffering, to FURNIS8 FKICK'OK CHARGE. Association is a benevolent Instill d by special endowment, for there. and distressed, afflicted with "Viro. min and its funds er purpose. It has now a surplus Oj he. Directors liavc" voted to adverts c. It is needless lo add that IheAj. lands the highest Medical skill of ilj inrnUh "tlic most approved moden iltiablc. advice also given to sick aa i-s, afflicted with Worab Complaijt Dr. GEO. R. CALHOU? rtjeon, Howard Association, No. i Pliiladclpliia, Pa.- II President. CI1II.D, Secretary. j, (I the si i.fi formerly occupied bjB. '.Y, ;imi ,re now receiving and selliEil UK ol tl.i and finest >iiv GOODS, Vtilings and Furnishiiif of every descripLioa, i durjMe j-rmls up to a fine qualitjol In-fit r.v, Sinrting-, Clothing. ami inltT styles, well made and ol !'T [irifo jskrd. OTS iK.- SHOES it-L down to Brogansand Boofo car, ami iiL Mich prices as cannot fill customer. We olsokecpcoa- K, FISH  TT FIRE INSURANCE CO New York S200.W ORK LIFE INSURANCE CO. Acrnmulatid Capital SI succeeded to the of CiCo.Tliompson, Esq., is prep1 s aiu! i-.-ur- (..ilicics in the above rth.ible slock Ci.injinnies, lihnps irisuml for years at r ih'.se of inutudi prinnpljy und satisfaclorilv nJ 3t lln.v otticc. ons bv nnil rrrcive prompt atttt C. H THOMSON, Concert Hall Block. 20, D O T i, I DO: I jay th-U FOLE id rlte.ipcst assurlment of in WellsboFo.' Such heavy cases LU SHOW t.ltnt" i ies, Clocks A. FOLE' II, _______, BIRD, CONVEYANCERS. to all business entrusted to iromplncss and fidelity. Addres" JLAXD, POTTER I. 1LLEN, COLE ER HAIR DRESSER- AVcllsboro'Pa. e rear of Y.-UIIJ'S Book Store. E' line of buMness will be done nptly as it can he done in the saloons. Preparations'for rfiO" id beautyfiing the hair' for liskers dyed any color.' Call Oct 18, ot JTyttrom anar tte subscriber when the term for paid shall eipired, iBi Oat? on the of ;Ae toet wiUthen be rtopped until a further re- be received. By this arrangement no man 6' 12 96 00 SCO 15 00 20 00 3000 4000 the County. __ yoL..IY. WELLSBOB03TIOGA COUNTY, I A., t per .__________________ 9 _-----------------------------1--------------------------------------- FEBBtAET 18, 1858. NO. XXIX. _______ F. M. .oved to the buildiDg formerly BS' one door below in? if Wm.Roberls, d keeps constantly oo: lediuio, and best M obacco. reasonable. THE YOUNG VOYAGKEBS, A THRILLING "Come, Anne, coroe sisters. Come aboard hiy ship, and we'H a jolly nice afternoon. I'll be a eea captain like my faiher, and show how he great packet ship aeroas the ocean. Come, girls, get Anna, you shall be my male, and liitle Jenny thall be our cook and steward." The speaker was a handsome, fair haired, rosy cheeked boy, wilh_ bright, laughing blue eyes, about ten years old, who during his ad- dress, WM busily engaged in rigging the mast and sail to a ship's launch which was made fast to ibe beach in one of those secluded, picturesque little coves or inlets, with which iba souih shoraof Long Island, between Fire Island and Rockaway, is so plentifully in- dented. The boy's companions were two little girls of eight and six years, beautiful as angels, and so exactly like their brother in every fea- ture, thai they seemed ar perfect copies all but the long, sunny ringleis of his exquisite face. Anne, the elder girl, bounded lightly into the boat a! her brother's first invitation, and began assisting him about the sail. But litlle Jenny who was lugging along a great bas- ket filled with pies, sweet cakes and which ihey had brought from a beautiful col- lage not far off, for a little pic nic djnner hesitated in silence till her brother urged her again lo get in the boat, when she began to. argue with him thus: Willie, don't let us go in-the boat to- day there is so much wind, apd we might be "You are a little coward, Jenny, to pa interrupted the young captain impa- tienily. "It's the pleasaniest day we have had for a month and it's so late in the fall, that if we don't go to day, I am sure we shall not get another chance thta year. Come, Jenny, don't be -jump in." "Oh, I'm not afraid, brother, and child as she was, lilile Jenny's cheeksi glowed for a few moments with a deeper vermillion tint, at the implied question of courage by her brother. "I'm not in the least afraid, Willie but you know mother has often told us we must no', go in the boat when it blows hard. "All I'm afraid of is disobeying her." "Then you may come into the boat with- out fear, sister, for mother told me I might sail this afternoon, not five minutes before we left the house." "Yes, I know that, Willie, but that was two hours ago when it was calm. It blows a great deal harder now, and I'm sure mother would not like us lo go away fropn the shore in the boat when there is such a wind." "O nonsense, Jenny I have been all over ths cove when it blew a great deal harder than this. Molher, you know, says I am ihe best sailor along the coast, and just as well able lo iudge when the weaiher is fit to go on a cruise as she is. Come, sister, we can't get drowned, fpr the water is so shallow at ebb tide, and with this west wind, that we could wade anywhere about ihe cove." Thus persuaded, Jenny passed the basket lo her brothrr, and then clambering into the boat herself, shi took a seat beside Anne in the stern sheets, and soon the launch was under weigh. Sha was a great, heavy clumsy boat as nil of her class usually are, with a single lug sail of heavy canvuss, aliogether illy calcu- lated for a pleasure craft. But liuis Willie Wallon managed wilh con- summiis skill for so young a commander, and they had made several stretches across the when, as they were passing ihe inlet that opened out sea-watds, Anne's eyes rested upon iba bright, blue waves of the Atlantic, fcroutibeyond the discolored water along the coast, and clapping her hands with a sudden ecslacy infantile joy, exclaimed "O Willie, Willie Let us go out there and sail on that beautiful blue ocean Wo'nt it be grand 1 So much prettier than this dirty little cove wilh the bare aand banks all about us." Willie sprang to his feet, and gazing to the offirig, his bright eyes lit up with ihe enthusi- asm caught from bis sister's words and he re- plied "We'll go out there and have a glorious sail just like the great ships and steamboats thai we see go by." "0 don't go out there, brother interposed little Jenny, ner cheek growing pale as the dolioate lilly. "Don't go, Willie, mother will be angry with us." "Mother will do no such a thing, Jenny: She will be proud of us to think that we have been out on the ocean all alone. I can easily eoma back with the flood tide lhat will soon w selling in." And without further argu- reckless UP nis helm, eased sheet, and away out through the inlet, line of blue water [outside, went 'he launch, hurried along before the strong oreeze which to the sirenjth of the last ebb, bora her away a speed that sunk the ,idgc to a mere line Ihe margin of the wide ocean, and the while collages with Venetian b inda, into toy nouses dotted with bright green.specks. The colored water-which. appeared from ihe cove a narrow Mrip dividing the white strip ein j deep azure of the OCBan a balt of sereral miles wilh the nne Breeze and strong lide'the boati sped on j wjiile of lheir 'he n.tur.1 caused the the m, as hllhe There was y, utter helplenwM, suddenly shadowing t leir bright vision; and there was a word of pathos in little Jenny's sweet, low voice, as sh; laid, her band gently on her brother's arm, and looking up in bis eyes whispered: "O Willie, let us go home. Mother would feel very bad if aha knew we had come away out here." Willie beat down and kissed his sister's pale cheek, >s he replied "We wil go back home. Jenny; I was naughty to come off so far from land. But don't cry, sptcr. I am sorry. Don't blame me, I couIdtA help h; i loved the sea too much." "No, we blame you, Willie, only lef us hurry back for see, yonder is a black cloud coming up in the. west, and I am afraid if we do no------" The child's speech was arrested by a groan of anguish >om -her brother, whose eye for the first lirre had bean directed towards a bank of murky douds heaving up in the west, by his sister's remark and at the very the vision first rested upon (he black pall, a chain of brilliant zig zag lightning rose, quivering along its upper edge, and a few moment! later, there came to their ears a low mulle -ed roar of far off thunder. The captain had hauled his little vessel by th-j wind, but the clumsy thing lay broad off u ider ill-fitted sail. Besides ihe wind, which she had scarcely felt while run- ning off before it', had now increased so much thai she hee ed over lill there was graat dan- ger of her capsizing, to prevent which, Willie, with Ihe assistance of his two set about reefing the sail. This was soon accomplished, and agai n the boat was steered as close as she would go; which at thi best was little better than eight points, so that with her great leeway, Willie soon found .hat in spile of his uimost skill, his craft was drifting rapidly out to sea. Nearer and nearer rolled on ihe embattled legions of black storm clouds; louder came the fearful thunder crashes, more vivid gleamed ;he red lightning's flash, wilder Lie shrieking gale swept by, howling and scream- ing dread notes of terror to the young voya- gers. The in wilh the land was quite to heave up ihe foam-crestec waves here and there all around them, curling over and breaking all feather- white in long lines of hissing sprays. Great round drops of rain came palling down in the water and telling on the thwarts and gun- wales of, the boat with a sharp, click noise that smote s.artingly dismal on Ihe ears of the three lill.e ocean wanderers. i Young as he was, Willie retained ih his mind much af what he had heard his father relate al various limns, in regard to Ihe man- agement of a ship in a .gale and the knowl- edge he had thus gahed in theory, now s'ood in good stead. -He lad heard of keeping a ship before n a squall, and of scudding in a gale. The lull-sailing, clumsy boat was his ship. The .hebry which he had learned he proceeded to put in Traclice and when the first mud gust of.yel ing tornado fell upon the launch, she was going dead before the wind -----otherwise her sail would have been blown away, or she would have been swamped in an instant. As it was, she went flashing on through the storm, right out into the mighty wilderness of waters. Ten, fifteen minutes went by, and still the war of the elements went on in iheir terrible fury and s ill the brave little fellow stood at Ihe helm, bare headed, his cap blown away, his clolhes c ripping with water, and, steady "to his his liny bark on and away before the fierce, howling blast. Once, only, he faltered and lhat was when the launch quivered for a moment, on the crest of a mightv surge, aad then went reel- ing and plugging, standing almost on end down into the hissing vortex of the liquid -ravine. Then, a single, quick cry of horror escaped the soy's lips; but the next moment Jenny crept up to his side and laid her hand upon his shoulder and spoke in a low sooth- ing tone, thiLt almost instantly called back his confidence, and elicited from his lips a cry of admiralion "or his sister's heroism. "Don't be frightened, dear spoke the linle "Molher says': that God watches over people that live on the And don't yau remember, brother, how often our dear mother has told us that Jesus loves litlle children? If God watches us and Jesus loves us, ve shall be safe. So don t be afraid." wild and gloomy night, came down upon the world of waters, and siil the lempesi raged; and there, in their frail, open boat, we will leave the young voyagers speed- ing on and c way, right out into the very learl of the Atlantic ocean. We will bid them adieu and glance back to iheir their fond mother, rendered desolate in the heart by the dread calamity that had fallen upon her in the loss of her children. Al the moment when the children first em- barked, Mrs Walton had glanced out towards the cove, aid or a few moments watched them with a 1 a mother's font pride as she 'saw (hem sailing to and fro on the quiet wa- ters of the bay and then some visitor called and she forgot her children until just as the storm came down, when a neighbor rushed in with the intelligence that the launch had seen seen only a few minutes pre- viously, several out to sea. The first terrible shook almost killed her, but soon ra lying her woman's energy and mother's love, she rushed from her home, re- gardless of the furious storm, aroused her neighbors, and besought them with all the eloquence ciHed up by the deep anguish of her riven heart, to help recover her lost dar- lings. There WM no at Roofcsway or Falk- Der'a Islanc, and to venture out to sea t a storm wilh such small crafts as were kept along the shore, were worse than madness, and immediate dispatches, were sent to New York, not only to the owners of I ,ie ship com- manded by Captain Walton, bu the Pilots; and within an hour after Ihe news had reach- ed the city, two of the siauncbesi pilot boats, manned by extra picked crews of gallant souls, were under wajr, and speeding iheir swift-winged course in search .of the ocean losl children.. Mrs. Watson herself hastened lo the city to urge wilh her presence and inrfaence, more "prompt action; but the vessels had been gone an hour when she arrived, and so she repair- ed to Ihe house of Mr. Alvin, tie owner of Ihe ship her husband commanded, to await the return of those who had so nobly genre forth in that mad storm in searc i of her three darlings. Leaving her there in a sta e of fevered anxiety, hoping in the very teeth of despair, we too will go forth into the wild, yelling gale lo loot upon a most sublime ocean pic- ture. Il was an hour past as Ihe deepest eel s of an inquisitorial cungeon, save when the vivid lightning's flash lit up the Cim- merian blackness with glare rivalling (bat of the brightest noonday sun. Some ninety miles to the eastward of Sandy Hook, lay hove too a noble ship, inward bound, in one of the most terriic gales that, ever swept along the coast. The gale had just set in an hour before sundown, and ever since dark the ship had been hove too under the shortest possible canvass, heading up west south west, with the gale com ng in violent 1 squalls oui at due north-west. "Do ycu think there is any danger to us or the ship, captain inquired one of three passengers who stood near the commander of the ship, partly sheltered from the storm by the protecting roof of ihe round house. "Not the least, Mr. Kiogsly. You ate as safe 'here as you would be at your own house in New York. She is a bran new ship, 'and I have hac no opportunity of trying her hove to before; but I am perfectly satisfied with her .behaviour. In fact I never saw any craft conduct herself quite as well in a hurricane like this. 'Tis a terrible night, however, and God help ihose who may chance to be out on a smaller craft than ours For ihe last hour I have been thinking of my wife and children. My wife will not sleep a wink to-night. She never can in a storm like this when I am not at home. I was cast away once on the Long Island and not half a mile from home, in just such a gale, only it was south-weal. I would give a hundred dollars this moment to be at home only for my wife's sake. But we God what is I ha A continuous flash of lightning lit up the surrounding space, and as darkness shut in again, a faint but clear and Ahoy uttered by a femaletpr a child, came down on the blast from directjy 'o wind-ward. A moment after the hail was repeated, and another flash of lightning revealed a boat driving square down before the and al- most under (he ship's quarter, ireone could count five, ihe shrill, quivering cry came up from ihe boat as it shot past the ship not three fnthoms clear of the rudder. "Merciful heaven There are three chil- dren in thai boat yelled Mr. Kinsley, who with the captain was peering cown over the (affrail as Ihe boat flew past. "Hard up your my man, said the Captain, in a voice as calm as man's 'voice could be, and then calling to .he chief and I'hird males, who were both on deck, he in- formed them of the fact thai a small open boat with three children in it, lad just gone past, and i len gave his orders: Mr. Casey, please get ouljon the flying jib boom and 
                            

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