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Warren Morning Mirror Newspaper Archive: May 15, 1928 - Page 1

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Publication: Warren Morning Mirror

Location: Warren, Pennsylvania

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   Warren Morning Mirror (Newspaper) - May 15, 1928, Warren, Pennsylvania                               Thing In The ASSOCIATED PRESS DISPATCHES REFLECTING THE BFST IN WARREN FORTY-THIRD YEAR MAY 1928. PRICE THREE CENTS 1 A Clean Newspaper For the Entire Family Fanatic Attacks Aviator High Air FISHERMEN BELIEVED TO LOST THEIM LIVES HAMMER IS FLIER LANDS SHIP Is My Reads Note Found in Pocket of Maniac Man Believed Crazy Hires Birdman to Transport Him From Detroit to Mich. Plane Righted After Period of Coma. Nat. Manufacturers' Asso. Adopts Its Platform To Present At 2 Conventions MISFORTUNE STILL DELAYS PROGRESS OF RELIEF FLIERS One is Caught Fast in River Other Lands Fuel- less in a Pasture May 14. Attacked feet in the air by an alleged maniac ham- Harry a commer- cial after losing conscious- ness and nose diving to a hundred feet of the ground recov- ered in thne to partially right his airplane and avert destruction here tonight. Harry of whom police believe to be deranged is charged with attacking the pilot after employing him to fly from to Pontiac. Both men were taken to a hospi- tal because of injuries sustained in the forced landing near if Frechette recovers he will be removed to Jail for a sanity officials said. Anderson told police that as they approached Frechette ob- tained a hammer and began to be- labor him. must have been unconscious for some time probably more than a Anderson when I came' we were headed in a nose dive. I jerked the controls and tried to right the and managed to slow its pace. Just as I was swinging out of the I felt the wheels of the under-car- some went riage touch the ground for distance and then the ship over the The plane was demolished. An- derson was more severely hurt by the hammer attack than in the wreck. One blow had knocked out most of his and because of the difficulty with which he was able to hospital officials re- fused to permit his being question- ed at length. lefused to answer when queried regarding the attack .1 letter addressed to a Miss Georgia Pardee of found in his is my sweet- The wreck occurred at the grounds of the state hospital for the Insane at and was witnessed by a number of attaches of the institution. The plane was seen to aproach at an altitude of about feet. Then it began to spiral but maintained its altitude for a mo- ment. There was a lurch and then it made a sheer drop toward the ground. When at an estimated al- titude of about 200 feet the ship appeared to rignt and most of those present thought the fliers had been performing particularly daring stunts An instant how they said the ship struck the and its underpinning crum- turning the plane over sever- al times. There was a rush to extricate the filers. In one hand badly still clutched the handle of the hammer. CASE IS PRESENTED D. May right of owners of an unpatented invention used by the United States in the manufactuie of gas during the World to recover compensation from the presented in a case brought by the Rodman Chem ical company of Pittsburgh and Hugh Rodman of Pa not be passed upon by the supreme it was announced today. DR. JACOBS IS CHOSEN N. May Misfortune continued today to delay the progress of two United States army amphibian planes fly- ing to the assistance of the German monoplane Bremen in Labrador. Leaving St. N. this morn- the planes were separated to- one having been caught fast in river mud near N. S and the other having landed fuel- less in a pasture outside of Tatam- N. S. Misfortune first came to the ex- pedition soon after it reached Can- ada when Lieut. Fairchild was tak- en ill with appendicitis after piloting one of the Planes to St. John. Another pilot was sent to replace him and Fairchild was resting at a hotel today with an army plane waiting to carry him home as soon as his condition war- ranted removal. The_two relief planes left John Pictou this pi- loted by Lieutenant Fair- child's who had Major General chief of the United States air as passenger and Captain Ira carrying Fred Junkers expert. Both planes landed at the mouth of the Shubenacadie river. Cap tain Baker's ship was able to take to the air again but the plane car- ilying General Fechet stuck in the mud so firmly that there was no hope of getting free until the tide should float the plane. After leaving its sister ship be- Captain Baker's plane ran out of gasoline over Tatamagouche and landed in a pasture. The pilot leported that he anticipated no dil- ficulty in securing more fuel but would not attempt to continue un- til tomorrow. The flight was undertaken to help the Bremen continue its flight from Labrador to New its original when it took off from Ireland more than three weeks ago. Planks Define Attitude of American Industry as Represented by Coterie Opinions Expressed on Such Issues as Federal Reserve Banking Foreign Em- Etc. Jap Authorities See No Tsinan Solution 1 NEW May 14. The National Association of Man- ufacturers todajr adopted a plat- form which it announced will be submitted at the national conven- tions of both major political parties nest month. Its planks define the attitude of industry as represented by the association on such issues as the federal reserve banking foreign trade private relations tax- flood the tariff and the government's part in business. The platform was prepared by a special committee which drew Its membership from 35 states. The platform protests against the government's entering into compet- itive enterprises with its declaring urge more reliance upon private energy and and less upon public law and appro- It warns against entering into foreign but recommends that the United States its i-.ll share toward the promotion of International good feeling. The federal reserve system is praised as an aid to industry and while a national merchant marine is urged as for national CHINA SANS COMPETENT LEADERSHIP No Immediate Prospect of Negotiations For Settle- ment of Great Problem Additional Troops Needed to Protect Railway From Tsingtao in Order to Maintain Communications Between 2 Cities security On flood and successful foreign the platform PROTEST ENTOMBMENT OF A HORNED TOAD May 14. inclined Eastland citizens obtained a court order to- day against the sealing of a horned toad in the cornerstone of the new court house and the placed in the stone was none the worse for its 48 hour en- tombment. Protests calling for the reptile's release of respect for Christ- and the humane citizenship of moved the commission- ers court to order the stone un- sealed and the subject of the exper- iment liberated. The tradition in this section that a Texas horned toad can live indef- initely without water or air was said to have been proven here recently when one was removed alive from the cornerstone of the old courthouse when it was torn down after a reputed entombment of 31 years. suggests the development of a plan the direction of engineering officers of the United States in con- sultation with the most competent civilian professional Agricultural another plank provide for equalization with manufacture and industry in tariff and freight A revision of ai_y tariff schedules including the free list to meet changing economic con- it is essential tc the proper conduct of interna- tional and domestic Continued governmental develop- ment of commercial aviation is and the platform advocates of waterways where their economic expediency can be fa- Elimination of unnecessary com- p ition among transportation agencies is and pro- tectio i is urged to insure the dom- ination of all local railroad reg- May authorities at Tsin gtao today said they saw no im- mediate prospect of negotiations with the Chinese over the Tsinan believing there is no re- sponsible Chinese authority with whom a settlement can be discuss- ed. They also declared additional Japanese troops are needed to pro- tect the railway running from Tsingtao to Tsinan in order to maintain communications between the two cities. The Northerners- are still in con- trol of but in view of reports that the Nationalists are steadily nearing Impor- tant port in the Province of Chihli the troops in Tsingtao are said to be restless. Conditions are reported quiet at Tsinan where the Japanese are in control. Several American who left the Shantung capital when the Nationalists Invaded that are now planning to return there. Advices from Shanghai today said the Nationalist government is j anxious to .accept responsibility for the activity of the Nationalist fore es and to Inflict just punishment for their but is not will- ing to take upon itself blame for the Tsinan incident. It was said that Ho commander of the Nationalist third army dismissed from the post after clashes between the Jap- anese and southerners in was ousted because his troops fail- AND WINNERS Little Probability That Boro Will Be Afflicted With Daylight Saving Time STORY ESPYVILLE MISHAP DUE TO NEGLIGENCE OF THE 2 DRIVERS Engineer Testifies He Be- lieves They Were Racing and Ran Into His Train Engine Stops While Crossing Lake and Boat Gradually I Fills With Water Lack of System and Fore- 7 17 -j tU Lone Member or rarty Man- thought is Lvident m the c A J c j D i-' i to owim Asnore and becond rresentation MI L n Makes Way to Remote All Victims Prominent May grade crossing crash at Pa which took a toll of eight was found by a coroner's jury today to have been due to negligence on the part of the drivers of the two automobiles and that there was no negligence on the part of employes of the Pennsylvania railroad company. Engineer James Pilmer of Erie said the two cars ran into his engine at the crossing and that he racing With No Power Changes' Previous Burgess Will Befriend Man With Veto Measure May members of a. fisn- Q_ i ing were believed to have 1 drowned Sunday when their motor boat sank in 60 feet of water la. Moosehead Lake Police Captain Concentrated effoi to afthct T _ _ Warren with the rather comical James E' of arrangement fell short the established goal last night even though the town exhausted. thought to be the only i swam reached west outlet believed the drivers were and failed to see the train. The jury was empaneled by W E. of coroner of Crawford county. Joint funeral services for Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Hayes and their four of victims of the will be held Wednes- day. Double funeral services will be held at Albion on the same day for Ward Thomas and his Wil- liam the other two persons killed at the crossing One little Donald on- ly surviving member of the Hayes who Is a patient in hospi- tal was reported today as being unconscious. He was behev-jj ed to be suffering from a head in- jury X-ray pictures to be taken. oil demonstrated a change of senti- ment and 2 pioved sucn an ai- 9 to because Dr. Le- Roy E. -ftill veto the resolution. No ordinance or resolution can go into effect in any event until signed by the burgesb and although the resolution approved council last night has a clause ordering a commencement or publication to- this is illegal and carries no authirity. No ordinance or resolu- tion can be published until it car- ries the burgess' Mgnature. SENTIMENT Students at Brignam young Uni- facing the problem of choosing a beauty queen from three brunet and did the tactful thing and chose are the threa Elene Clegg ed to obey orders to advance north sophomore Marjone Sparks ward. He was not held responsible for the clashes between the Japs and it was explained that although Ho Yao- Tsn was unable to control his men and was therefore not responsible for their acts the government con- sidered his removal necessary in order to maintain military disci- pline. ulatory bodies by the interstate j commerce commission. OFFICERS OF EASTERN CONFERENCE ELECTED NICARAGUAN REBELS MISTREAT AMERICAN ST. LOUIS. May 14. After a spirited contest continuing three days. Dr. F. M. or N. Y general was today elected a bishop of the African Methodist Zion church in quadrennial conference here. Dr. F. L. Madison of Pa his closest withdrew aft- er seven ballots and Dr. Jacobs was chosfn unanimously. Weather Indications May 14. rebel V nd terribly mis- treated the wire of an Ameiican named Miller at his plantation on the river near the east in revenge for information had stiven the manne it was learned from belated dispatches CONGRESS MAY END SESSION JUNE FIRST May a meeting House Repub- lican leaders. Speaker Longworth today said in his opinion Congress probably would adjourn about June 1. He added that the conference had been for the purpose of discus- sing a prospective adjournment date and that it was impossible to say definitely just when that would take place. Representative Tilson of Connec- the majority floor concurred with the speaker. Both agreed there was but little if any chance of it being earlier. The speaker said slow progress being j made by the Ssnate on the tax bill was a factor entering into the un- certainty of adjournment. He ex- red-haired and Christine HmcUey more blond. Aad now everybody's happy. AIRMAN IS KILLED IN A PRACTICE FLIGHT PHILADELPHIA. May A. C. H. of Muh- lenberg was elected presi- dent of the eastern collegiate ath- letic conference at the semi-annual meeting today. Other officers elect ed were W. H. Hitchler of Dickin- May 14 Lieut. F. R. Euse of the Naval Air Corps was killed here while making a practice flight in prepar- ation for the coming Schneider cup races. His home at Ridley Pennsylvania. For a leason thai has not been the flier's 0-2-U-l sea- plane crashed into the Potomac about a mile below the naval air station. No neaibv witnesses could vice and be huL who aaw the i BUFFALO MEN HELD IN LIQUOR CONSPIRACY N. Y May 14 C- former prohi- bition administrator in this dis- and Leo A. former sistant administrator have been indicted for conspiracy to vi- olate the prohibition law in connec- tion with the alleged diversion or alcohol from the Illinois Alcohol Company of they will ap- pear in court tomorrow to tile it was announced tonight ny Richard H. United States district attorney. Hugh R. general mana- ger of the Illinois Alcohol Company also has been indicted and will ap- pear to file bonds. The diversion Is said by federal officials to have been in excess ot worth of alcohol. BYRD'S PLANE MAKES FIRST TEST FLIGHT the knew we depend on Old that enus a.11 this an awful blow to the golfer but it me These were just d. tew of the expressions heard the Mir- ror telephones last night when many people called in to find out about the daylight saving vote and were informed that al- though council had appioved s77i.j an Burgess Chapman would veto the reso- lution. Not a single word in favor it daylight saving was heard. The chiefly from Brock- Fire Chief William F. Daley. Dr. Arthui F. tormer city physician. Sheriff Earl P. Blake of Ply- Mass. Dr. David Bridgewood. John manufacturer. Fied highway commis- fcioner. Dr. Frank Moberg. Harry former mayor. Sam boatman. L. Knute Salanden operator ot the boat. i The parti left Greenville Sunday for Tomhegan camps. Crossing the i the engine stopped and the 1 Tealarg craft gradually filled. j Lavs said he and. Dr. Peterson put on life preservers and jumped over the side. The doctor. Lays sw-ara along behind evidently holding up well in the choppy cold water. Lays reached shore about but was to find a trace of Di Peterson or uMier members of the party Searchers tonight were covering the lake surface around Sandbar where sections of the mo- toi boat and life preservers were found. Other searching parties were scouring the woods and shore line in hopeb of finding other members of the paity who might have swam ashoie. graduate manager at Franklin and secretarv- treasurer. Following the at which eligibility rules were the delegates were the guests of Dick- inson 'College at a dinner. The college making up the con- ference are Muhlf-n- Franklin and Gett- and all of which were represented at the meeting. accident fiom distance estimated that the plant fell from an altitude of 50 to 150 feet. Although the wrecka-je of the p n was quicklv it was j not until seveial houis laUT that1 i the body was recovered. It ha I ap- 1 parently befn ilno.vn clear of the pKnf and was by drag- j a con-iderabl distance beiow the point plane crashed into the r. plained that Senate leaders expect- ed action on the measure last weeK at present there were no indications as to just when this would now be taken. IS RADIO ENGINEER JURY WILL INVESTIGATE CRIME leaching here today. Mille was away May Drives against crime and political corruption gained impetus todav under the direction of the Chica-u bar association and the Chicago crime commission. A petition of the bar association afking for a special grand jury to SEVTTLE May j investigate a disorders and The plane u-fjf. with the excep- tion of tne noisted from the so badlj damaged that w re unaole to de- termine tae caii-t of tne accident. May mander Richard E. Byrd's tri- motor Fokker which has been undergoing tests at the east Boston airport during the past few- made its first test flight with pontoons in place of its reg- ular landing gear todav. Pilot Wilmer Stultz flew his crafo at an altitude of 2.000 feet over the inner harbor for some hours. D. S. Wemer and Richie ac- companied Stultz on the flignt. A lifting test will be made to- morrow. SEEK MUMMIES OF i FIRST AMERICANS NO EXPENDITURE from when the rebels came to seek him. They assaulted Mrs. car- ried off everj thing of value and wrecked the plantation. The entire lower river district was incensed at the savagery of the rebels. It is nor known whether Mrs. Miller is also an American. GETS PRO JOB IN TEXAS Larry who played in I British will be pro at a WESTERN i rountrv club when Fair and warmer T'ues- he returns to this country late in F. Seattle radio announced today he has been notified of his appointment as a radio engineer with the proposed of Commander Rickard E. the South Mason flight Byrd to was a member of a Polar expedition headed by Captain George H. Wil- kins in 1926-27. SIMMONS RE-ELECTED NEW May E. H. H. Simmons today was re- irregularities at the recent pri- was granted by Judge Wil- liam V. chief justice of the criminal court. The crime tn a hear ing before six judges of the crim- inal told what it believed was wrong with the administration of justice in the county and was or- dered to file a statement giving specific dates and names BELLIXGH May 14 to niid mumniK-s. of the fir-t of North Am- old. r ih-in those found in Tutanknamrn b reposing m HOUSTON. May to a demand from Sen- ator Heflin of Alabama that he be called to testify in the Senate campaign expenditure Jesse H. of chair- man of the finance committee ot the Democratic national today declared he made no the cave.s ot the Aleutian Islands and other northern Char- j contribution to the pre-conventlon les H. who jointlv heads an expenses of any presidential oandi- expedition that search for will leave heie tomorrow for i Alaska. Mr. Stohl is accompanied by his wife just arnvpd hpre from the ECUADOR FEELS SHOCK Burgess Chapman has until the next meeting of which will be held in to approve or veto j the resolution. Evidently those be- hind the daylight saving which is heartily opposed by' the working gave the matter little forethought or else took Bur-' gess Chapman for for they i asserted a provision regarding pub- i hcation weekly of the beginning today. May 15th Lack- ing the burgee' the res- olution could be brought up before i th council at the June meeting to be raised over his but it 's extr mely unlikely that enough of a vote could be mustered. It cannot be officially published. It was quite evident last night that those behind the proposition have been doing some more or less hard work since the meeting of May 7th when the vote was 11 to 7 against daylight saving Althougn evidencing disapproval la-.tweek.' M E Stewart and President of Council J H- Perks voted for light saving last evening Council- men G. M. Borg and H. who voted a--aln.st it lait asked to be ej.cu.--e-d from the voting last night. Council-1 men S. J. Offerlo and D. L. Lew it. two more who were it a week were absent last evening. Al these contingencies swung tne to the other Fide. Counrilrr.en. t C. J. F'ranU W. L. W and Wells stuck to their vote of a casting when the roll was cast. Those who scanned the resolu- tion adopted night sleaned many hearty laughs therefrom. Those who drew is up evidently forgot to take the burgess into con- sideration or else they took it for granted he would not dare so against a majority vote of council. I They also neglected to remember that council has no power in the matter anjwav. And besides mtro- ducing a new time those who concocted the amusing WESTINGHOUSE CO. MAKES ANNUAL REPORT NEW May i N income of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing f T- made public today in the annual was equivalent to per share of common as compared With. or S6.S1 per fo 1926. Th company's total sales reach- ed S as compared m 1026. The report shated that during th year representing a federal income tax reserve no longer had been restored to the surplus and a reserve of cieated for pensions and otner possible adjustments. The account for and. xv-as written down to from STEEL HEAD RESIGNS May The Bethlenem Steel Company to- dav announced that L. V. superintendent of the Franklin plan of the company had re- si to become connected TrttH tne Colorado Fuel and Iron Com- pany at Col. He will here by F. J. lor- nifrly of the Bethlehem plants Lackawanna. N. and Pa E W. Trexler will take We place as superintendent of tne mecha.nica.1 plant. EARTHQUAKE RECORDED elected president of the New York described as of unusual was recorded to- day on the seismogiapu Regis stock exchange to serve a fifth term Other officers also were re- j ___ ___ May 14. east. He will join buildings were i little resolution also dictated that j en and a party of scientists in damaged by a strong earthshock manu- whence they j felt hero at this afternoon. should start their McCracken of the The people ran from their houses I running an hour earlier will procr-'-d tlToueh thn Aleutians and workshops in terror. Streets j lnan formerly on the new time In search whirh is spoi-oird by the I are littered in parts of the city j other words if a man used to go American Museum of Natural with portions of structuies j.._____________________________ tnrv -I loose bv the eiuake. on page TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS S M McClure. Ralph Owens. Bessie V. Elizabeth Sigworth Willard Graham J. A. James. Sophie Eaton. Clarence Pierce. Youngsville. Mrs. Albert Sheffield. vharles Nichols.   

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